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Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species

International wildlife trade is estimated to be worth millions of pounds and includes many thousands of plant and animal specimens.

The trade is diverse, ranging from live animals and plants to a vast array of wildlife products derived from them, including:

  • food products
  • exotic leather goods
  • wooden musical instruments
  • timber
  • tourist curios
  • medicines

The levels of exploitation of some animal and plant species is even bringing some close to extinction.

What is the Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES)?

The Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) is an international agreement between governments.

Its aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival.

Jersey is a signatory to CITES through the UK government.

How does CITES work?

CITES works by subjecting international trade in specimens of selected species to certain controls. In Jersey these controls are covered by local legislation, the Endangered Species (CITES) (Jersey) Law 2012, which came into force on 3 August 2012.

Endangered Species Law (Jersey Law website)

All import, export, re-export and introduction from the sea of species covered by the Convention has to be authorised through a permitting system which in Jersey is administered by the Department of the Environment.

What does this mean for me?

If you want to import or export a species or a part or derivative of an animal or plant that is listed under the CITES convention, you must apply to the Department of the Environment for the appropriate import or export permit. 

Permits are needed for CITES listed specimens going between the Channel Islands, to and from the UK as well as to and from the EU or the rest of the world. We are happy to check the list for you.

If you try to move a specimen, even in error, without the appropriate permit, the receiving country may well confiscate it.

Please allow 3 weeks for application forms to be processed.

Download CITES application for permit (size 76kb)
Download CITES application guidance (size 91kb)

Is there a fee to pay for a permit?

Yes, the fees for the Department to issue permits and certificates are as follows:

Permit Fee to issue (Article 19) Fee to alter / revoke a condition (Article 26) Fee to replace (Article 29)
Export permit £35 £20 £20
Import permit  £35 £20 £20
Re-export certificate £35 £20 £20
Introduction from the sea certificate £35 £20 £20
Certificate of origin £35 £20 £20
Certificate of captive breeding £35 £20 £20
Certificate of artifical propagation £35 £20 £20
Pre-convention certificate £35 £20 £20
Travelling exhibition certificate £35 £20 £20

Download CITES full Fees Order


Can these fees be reduced?

In certain circumstances fees can be reduced.  In particular, a fee of £35 is required for each application for a single specimen or any number of specimens as long as they:

  • are of the same species (in the case of animals other than corals) or genus (in the case of plants and corals) and
  • have the same source code and purpose code and
  • are to be transported between the same importer and exporter
In the case of travelling exhibitions the specimens form part of one travelling exhibition.

For further information please refer to CITES Policy note 1 - fees.

Download CITES Policy note 1 - fees (size 99kb)


Can these fees be waived?

An applicant can make an application to have the fees waivered if they are able to demonstrate the purpose of the import, export or re-export of specimens of a species referred to in the application is likely to bring conservation benefits to the species. To apply to waive fees please fill in and return Form A below prior to making your application.

Download CITES Policy note 1 - form A (size 200kb)



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