Skip to main content Skip to accessibility
This website is not compatible with your web browser. You should install a newer browser. If you live in Jersey and need help upgrading call the States of Jersey web team on 440099.
Government of Jerseygov.je

Information and public services for the Island of Jersey

L'înformâtion et les sèrvices publyis pouor I'Île dé Jèrri

  • Choose the service you want to log in to:

  • gov.je

    Update your notification preferences

  • one.gov.je

    Access government services

  • CAESAR

    Clear goods through customs or claim relief

  • Talentlink

    View or update your States of Jersey job application

Housing information during coronavirus

​Advice about moving home

As part of the Level 2 measures, you may now move home provided you adhere to the guidelines that are in force. This includes maintaining a 1 metre physical distance from those outside your household at all times.

Further information about the conditions that should be met when carrying out property viewings and moving home can be found in the Safe Exit Framework.

Those who are extremely vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19 (those with serious underlying medical conditions, who will have been contacted individually by their GP) are still advised to shield themselves and to stay home unless they need to move for health or safety reasons, or because you have nowhere to stay.

Housing gateway applications

As part of the Level 2 measures, social housing moves through the Housing Gateway will be restricted to urgent cases, including:

  • supporting those identified to be at risk in their current accommodation of domestic abuse and other forms of violence;
  • supporting those living in unsafe or unsuitable accommodation, which poses an immediate risk to their health and safety;
  • preventing severe overcrowding;
  • facilitating move-on from temporary accommodation;
  • facilitating discharge from hospital to free-up bed space for others requiring care; and
  • facilitating social housing capital refurbishment and redevelopment, and the transfer of existing tenants who are under-occupying their home; and
  • other exceptional circumstances to safeguard those who may be at risk. 

Social housing providers, Andium Homes and the housing trusts, will only allocate properties to those who are eligible for social housing. Further information about applying for social housing through the Housing Gateway.

Social housing allocations

Allocations will be made when a suitable property is available. 

Andium Homes has resumed allocating available properties through its Choice-Based Lettings service. Available properties will be offered to clients who express interest in suitable properties and are deemed in the most urgent need. A list of properties currently available on the Andium Homes website.

The housing trusts will contact you directly when they have a property available that is suitable for your needs. 

Applicants will be considered in date order of when their application was placed in Band 1. However, priority will be given based on the type and location of accommodation available. Applicants in Band 1 will be limited to one offer of accommodation. If an applicant refuses an offer of accommodation, without good reason, their application will be reviewed and may be moved down a Band.

If you're at risk of immediate harm by staying at your home, or do not have somewhere safe to stay, email Housing Gateway for help.

Help for rental tenants

To protect Islanders from becoming homeless during the COVID-19 outbreak, and to make sure fewer people face financial hardship, the following temporary regulations came into effect on 10 April and will remain in place until 30 September:

  • tenants in financial hardship due to COVID-19 cannot be evicted for failing to pay rent or other bills
  • landlords may not charge interest or any other fee on the late payment
  • landlords may not increase rents, including where notice of a rent increase was issued before the regulations came into force. Any rent increase may only come into effect after 30 September
  • tenants can extend their tenancies if they are due to end before 1 October 2020. Any fixed-term tenancy that is due to end before that date may continue as a periodic tenancy unless the parties agree to another fixed-term tenancy or to end the tenancy

If you're struggling to pay rent due to a reduction in your income caused by the coronavirus outbreak, you should write to your landlord with evidence of financial hardship and you should agree between you how to manage the rent arrears. 

After 30 September 2020, landlords are able to deal with rent arrears in the usual way – by serving notice for a breach of tenancy and applying to the Court in order to eviction. 

Guidance relating to rent and other payments for landlords and tenants of Jersey residential property during the COVID-19 crisis

COVID-19 (Residential Tenancy) (Temporary Amendment of Law) (Jersey) Regulations 2020 Guidance for Landlords and Tenants

Dealing with rent arrears

This advice on dealing with rent arrears applies to all forms of rented accommodation, including tenants who occupy a self-contained unit under a lease, and those who are lodgers and share some facilities.

You should speak with your landlord as soon as possible to advise them of any difficulty you will have in paying the rent if you're struggling to pay rent or make other payments to your landlord due to a reduction in your income caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

You should also confirm this with your landlord in writing and include evidence of financial hardship (and/or that of someone who helps paying your rent). You should then agree between you how to manage the rent arrears.

Providing evidence

The evidence you can provide includes written confirmation from your employer or other reliable source, confirming your situation that is affecting your ability to pay rent or other payments such as:
  • loss of job
  • coronavirus-related ill-health
  • suspension of your employment and/or payment of salarY
  • significant reduction in working hours and/or salary
  • the extent of any sickness benefit you are entitled under your employment contract (if any)
  • confirmation that you have no other independent sources of income
  • confirmation of your monthly household outgoings
  • confirmation that you have no personal savings, investment or property with a value in excess of £5,000 that could be used towards paying your rent or any other payments
  • confirmation of your entitlement to Social Security benefits such as Income Support and the Covid-Related Emergency Support Scheme (CRESS)
  • if you are self-employed, a written statement that your business activities have ceased trading or have been severely restricted or impacted due to the coronavirus outbreak
Based on this evidence, your landlord may agree with you a way to manage rent arrears or the payment of other amounts due. This may include:
  • deferring payments (you must still pay the full amount, but you will have longer to pay):
    • to partially defer your rent or other payments
    • to completely defer your rent or other payments
  • Waiving payments (you do not have to pay it at all)
    • to partially waiver your rent or other payments:
    • to completely waiver your rent or other payments
  • Changing terms of lease:
    • to temporarily renegotiate a reduced rent
    • to terminate your lease early
If your circumstances change, you should alert your landlord as soon as possible, for example if your financial situation improves and you are able to make earlier payment of rent arrears and other payments due.

Agreement between you and your landlord

Any deferral or waiver should apply from the date agreed between parties until 30 September 2020 or any longer period as may be agreed by you and your landlord. You should be given 12 months to make any deferred payments, unless a shorter period is agreed by you and your landlord.

Your agreement should be signed and dated by you and your landlord.

Your landlord may also be facing their own financial hardship and cannot agree to defer or waiver your rent or other payments. In these circumstances, you should ask your landlord for evidence of this financial hardship.

If you enter into an agreement with your landlord, they should not take legal action to recover any rent arrears or other payments from you and should not seek to end your lease or commence action to evict you before the end of the period agreed between you.

Tenants still have an obligation to pay rent and other payments due, and landlords still have an obligation to fulfil the terms of your lease. These measures do not apply where you had unresolved rent arrears or other non-payments before the coronavirus outbreak.

It is not compulsory to follow this process and, after 30 September 2020, landlords are able to deal with rent arrears in the usual way (by serving notice for a breach of tenancy and applying to the Court in order to evict).

However, if any dispute results in legal action, the Court will take account of the landlord and tenant’s behaviour and their willingness, and any subsequent agreement, to deal with rent arrears or non-payment of other amounts by using the process set out in this guidance.

These measures do not apply where you had unresolved rent arrears or other non-payments before the coronavirus outbreak.

Lodgings and shared accommodation

If you are a lodger and share some facilities in your accommodation, your landlord can ask you to leave for rent arrears or not making other payments at any time. However, this guidance can be used voluntarily to help negotiate with your landlord to manage those payments. 

Support with mortgage payments

If you’re struggling to make your regular mortgage payments, contact your bank directly to request a mortgage payment ‘holiday’.

It’s important that you don't just stop your direct debit or standing order. Any mortgage holiday must be agreed with your lender first. If you simply stop your payments without warning this will be recorded as a late payment, which will not only put you into arrears but will also likely affect your credit file (which could make it harder for you to access credit in future).

If you take a mortgage holiday you'll still be charged interest for the time you're not making payments. But you won't have to pay it back immediately, it will be added on to the total cost of your mortgage and factored into repayments when you start making them again.

Information for landlords

To reduce the spread of coronavirus, Islanders should not move home unless it is essential for their health or safety.

To protect the health of Islanders during these exceptional times, the following temporary regulations came into effect on 10 April and will remain in place until 30 September:

  • you can't evict tenants for failing to pay rent or other bills if they are in financial hardship due to COVID-19
  • you can't increase rents, including where notice of a rent increase was issued before the regulations came into force. Rent increases may only come into effect after 30 September
  • >tenants can extend their tenancies if they are due to end before 1 October 2020 either as another fixed-term tenancy or periodic tenancy, unless agreed by both parties
If a tenant is unable to pay rent or any other sum due, they should provide you with written notice of their situation and appropriate evidence of their financial hardship.

Where a tenant has given notice that they wish to end a periodic tenancy, they may inform you that he or she intends to remain in the accommodation.

If a tenant is unable to leave after notice has been given by you or the tenant, because of the COVID-19 outbreak, they may remain in the accommodation. The tenancy will continue as a periodic tenancy or a new fixed-term tenancy may be entered into. 

A periodic tenancy may only be ended by the tenant or where the tenant and the landlord both agree in writing that it should end.

If a tenant wishes to end a periodic tenancy, they may do so in the normal way by giving 1 months’ notice to end the tenancy. A landlord may not end a periodic tenancy during this period unless the tenant agrees.

After the coronavirus period 

After 30 September 2020, you may serve notice for breach of tenancy in the normal way and apply to the Court to terminate the tenancy agreement and seek to evict a tenant. 

You're requested to try to come to your own arrangement with your tenants to deal with rent arrears and failure to pay other sums of money. 

However, if you do apply to the Court, they will determine whether both parties acted reasonably based on the available evidence.

Breach of tenancy 

If your tenant is in breach of their tenancy agreement, unrelated to failure to pay rent or other sums of money owing, you may issue a tenant with notice.

This notice is to inform a tenant that they are in breach of their tenancy agreement and must correct that breach within 7 days. If they don’t, you may apply to the Court to terminate the tenancy agreement and seek to evict a tenant. However, these cases will not be heard by the Court in the foreseeable future, and the Court will set a date for future resumption of proceedings.

If you increase the rent payable during this period (10 April to 30 September 2020) you will be liable to a fine of up to level 3 on the standard scale, which is currently £10,000. This includes where notice of a rent increase was issued before the regulations came into force.

Guidance relating to rent and other payments for landlords and tenants of Jersey residential property during the COVID-19 crisis

COVID-19 (Residential Tenancy) (Temporary Amendment of Law) (Jersey) Regulations 2020 Guidance for Landlords and Tenants

Help for people who are homeless

If you, or someone you are aware of, is homeless, help is available, email houseing gateway. You can request help on behalf of somebody else.


Back to top
rating button