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Information and public services for the Island of Jersey

L'înformâtion et les sèrvices publyis pouor I'Île dé Jèrri

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Frequently asked questions for Government and States of Jersey employees about coronavirus

Information for our managers and employees

We recognise that this is a challenging time for all of employees.  We know that you’re all working so hard to maintain services for the people of Jersey, for which you should be proud.

We‘ve prepared these FAQs to provide as much information and guidance as possible to managers and employees about different situations arising at work as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

We will update these often, particularly as Jersey moves into a new level. Keep visiting this page regularly to ensure that you are following the latest advice as it will change as the situation changes.

It applies to all Government and States of Jersey employees, excluding the States of Jersey Police, where separate guidance will be issued internally within those departments.

The information on this page is believed to be accurate at the time of publication. You should continue to monitor the regular updates: this is a fast moving and changing situation where advice, guidance and the level of support offered may need to be reviewed, revised or withdrawn at short notice.

Absence

What happens if I can’t attend work because I’m in self-isolation?

Find the latest advice about self-isolation.

If you need to self-isolate, you’ll be entitled to receive your normal basic pay. If the reason for the self-isolation is connected to returning from off-Island travel, refer to the section Returning from off-Island travel.

Time away from the workplace for these reasons will not be logged against managing attendance triggers. We recognise that it might not be possible for you to get a sick certificate in these circumstances.

If, while self-isolating, you're well enough to work from home, and the nature of your role allows you to, then you will need to do so. Also see the section on self-isolation.

What happens if I’m absent from work looking after a dependant who needs to self-isolate?

In this scenario, you’ll be entitled to receive your normal basic pay while looking after a dependant. If the nature of your role allows you to work from home, then you will need to do so. If it does not, then you must report your absence to your line manager. Line managers must then enter the absence in MyView. Find out how to use MyView for Government employees.

Absence from work

You must report your absence to your line manager if you’re unavailable for work for whatever reason. Line managers must then enter the absence in MyView. Find out how to use MyView for Government employees.

  • you’re unwell and can’t work
  • you’re at home and caring for dependant(s), but due to the level of their needs, you’re unavailable to perform any work at all (for those able to work from home we do, however, expect employees to make every effort to fulfil their contractual obligations, for example, working flexibly at different times of the day than usual. See carer responsibilities for more information)
  • you're at home and unable to work due to the nature of your role or lack of suitable equipment, but are available to do alternative work

MyView for Government employees

Will I be entitled to sick pay if I have coronavirus or Long COVID?

Our usual sick leave and pay entitlements will apply if you’re unwell because of an initial diagnosis, or positive test result for, coronavirus.

You must report your absence to your line manager. Line managers must then enter the absence in MyView. We recognise that it might not be possible for you to get a sick certificate in these circumstances. Initial sickness absence due to a positive coronavirus test result won’t be logged against managing attendance triggers. However, if your sickness absence is ongoing resulting from Long COVID, this will be logged as part of our managing attendance procedures. Long COVID is a term that describes the effect of COVID-19 that continue for weeks or months beyond the initial illness.

If it does become necessary to close your workplace, you’ll be entitled to your normal basic pay throughout the period.

If your work can be done at home, then you'll need to do so.

Working from home

MyView for Government employees

Will I be entitled to sick pay if I become unwell after having a coronavirus vaccine?

Some people may feel unwell after receiving a coronavirus vaccine. Possible side effects from the coronavirus vaccine that you might experience are:

  • a sore arm
  • feeling tired
  • having an aching body or feel like you have the flu
  • having a headache
  • feeling hot
  • having swollen glands

If you experience any of these side affects you may still feel well enough to work. However, if you feel too unwell to attend work then our usual sick leave and pay entitlements will apply. The NHS reports that these side effects should be temporary and certainly shouldn't last more than a week. Sickness absence as a result of side effects after the coronavirus vaccine won't be logged against managing attendance triggers. You must report your absence to your line manager.

Information about COVID-19 vaccination

Absence reporting

How do I report absence?

You must report all absence from work or unavailability to work relating to the coronavirus or any sickness absence to your line manager. Line managers must enter this absence in MyView. Find out how to use MyView for Government employees.

For hospital-based employees using e-rostering, you should continue to report your absence in the usual way. If you don't use e-rostering, you should report your absence to your line manager. Line managers must then enter the absence in MyView. 

MyView for Government employees.

For States of Jersey Police you should continue to report absence using your normal system.

Advice about coronavirus

Where can I find advice about the Government of Jersey's response to coronavirus?

Government of Jersey’s response to coronavirus

You should check these pages regularly as the advice is being updated frequently.

Where can I find advice for Government of Jersey employees?

We’ve created a dedicated area where advice will be posted for our employees about different situations arising at work as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. This means that you can access this on any device that has internet access because it’s not hosted on the intranet. 

Coronavirus information for Government of Jersey employees

Advice and support

Is there any support for my wellbeing during this situation?

To help ensure the wellbeing of our employees during the coronavirus pandemic, we’re offering a variety of measures to provide advice and practical support. This information is posted on our wellbeing page to ensure that all of our employees can access it whether at work or at home.

If you’re feeling worried then you can also contact our Be Supported helpline, which is available at all times, every day on 0800 072 7072 or speak to your line manager. 

Annual leave

Arrangements if you're returning from off-Island travel

If the reason you travelled off-Island was for medical purposes on the advice of your treating doctor or for compassionate reasons, see separate advice in the section called Returning from off-Island travel.

If the Public Health advice requires you to isolate for any period, you’ll need to cover time that you’re unable to work by arrangements agreed with your manager, such as working from home, swapping of shifts, making hours up later, or through annual leave or unpaid leave.

You can only return to work once it is safe to so in line with public health advice regarding testing and isolation.

Does it matter which country I visit?

You should check travel classifications to understand what testing and isolation measures relate to you, based on your travel history.

What are my options on my return?

You should familiarise yourself with the Jersey’s Public Health information regarding travelling to Jersey and safer travel guidance. This information will provide you with all you need to know about any requirement for testing on arrival and any need to isolate. You must follow this information and not return to the workplace if you need to wait for a test result or isolate for a certain period.

Any self-isolation that's required in line with public health advice in addition to the wait for a negative test will need to be factored into your plans and taken as annual or unpaid leave, unless you can work from home. If you subsequently test positive for COVID-19, our usual sick leave and pay entitlements apply for any work time lost or annual leave taken since the test.

We'll record any sickness absence from COVID-19 on your file but it isn't counted under the attendance management policy.

If you need to be in work for a front-line role, such as a teaching or nursing, and you won't be able to return to work because of waiting for a test result, you must discuss and agree arrangements with your line manager before booking leave or committing to travel. We're asking managers to be as flexible as possible to balance individual wishes with operational requirements.

What if public health advice changes while I am out of the island?

Given all the public health information available on gov.je, we would asked you to make an informed choice when deciding whether or not to travel off island and factor in the possibility for disruption on your return should categorisation of countries change, or public health advice changes while you are away.

If categorisation or public health advice does change while you're out of the Island and subsequently an additional period of self-isolation (than you planned for) is required on your return, then you will need to cover the time that you're unable to work by arrangements agreed with your manager, such as working from home, swapping of shifts, making hours up later, or through annual leave or unpaid leave.  

In summary

If you’re considering off-Island travel:

  • read the public health advice and restrictions found on gov.je
  • factor any time to wait for test results or self-isolate into your leave arrangements
    discuss your plans with your manager before booking, so they can consider any implications before approving your leave
  • be aware that public health and government travel advice may change at any time, even while you’re away
  • discuss any questions with your line manager first. You can email further questions to peoplehub@gov.je
  • also check your travel insurance policies to see what’s covered in relation to the pandemic

If classification or public health advice does change while you're out of the Island and subsequently an additional period of self-isolation (than you planned for) is required on your return, then you will need to cover the time that you're unable to work by arrangements agreed with your manager, such as working from home, swapping of shifts, making hours up later, or through annual leave or unpaid leave.  

I have annual leave booked but I want to cancel it. Is this possible?

We recognise that given the global impact of coronavirus and the restrictions in place around travel worldwide, employees who had booked annual leave for a holiday either off or on-Island, may wish to cancel it and use their annual leave later in the year. However, during our response to COVID-19, there are demands across many services and on our colleagues, including those who would normally work during term-time only. We have a duty of care to all employees, and during this sustained period of response, we must ensure that colleagues are rested and have regular breaks from intensified work. We live in a beautiful Island and there are fantastic opportunities for taking some annual leave at home.

Annual leave position for 2020's annual leave entitlement

The Annual leave position for 2020's annual leave entitlement is shown below.  This position does not apply to your new 2021 annual leave entitlement, where the normal, pre-COVID-19, annual leave guidance will apply

Therefore, we'd encourage you to continue to take annual leave that's already booked. We may agree to you cancelling your annual leave in exceptional circumstances, but our agreement comes with the following requirements:

  1. we'd encourage employees to take all their annual leave entitlement by the end of 2020, unless it's agreed in advance before the end of November 2020, and by your line manager
  2. we anticipate that many employees will need to take the majority of their annual leave entitlement in the second half of 2020, but we must be able to adequately deliver services across the Government. Therefore, we need you to be flexible and continue to take some leave days during the COVID-19 pandemic, where possible. This will help us to ensure that colleagues are rested and have breaks from intensified work (see item 4. below)
  3. we also need you to be flexible about when you take your annual leave later in the year. Your line manager will need to factor in the leave of the whole team in a shorter period of the year and therefore your first choice of leave might not be available
  4. we're mindful of how hard our employees are working in response the coronavirus pandemic. In some areas employees are working long hours and beyond those they are contracted to work. We don't know how long the response will need to continue. Line managers must ensure that adequate rest days are factored into the working week, but may also request that you take short periods of annual leave and/or flexitime to supplement your rest days to safeguard your wellbeing and mental health.

I bought some extra annual leave in the 'buying additional annual leave' scheme. Can I cancel it?

If you bought any additional annual leave through our buying additional annual leave scheme, then we’ll buy back any of it that’s unused, or you can carry it over. See the question ‘Will I be able to carry over any annual leave into next year?’

Do I need to take all of my annual leave in 2020?

We’d encourage you to take all your annual leave entitlement by the end of 2020, unless it’s agreed in advance before the end of November 2020 and by your line manager. We do, however, accept that this may be difficult for everyone to achieve. For those employees who don’t have the opportunity to take all their annual leave in 2020, the expectation is that they must take at least the two weeks statutory minimum by the end of 2020.

Will I be able to carry over any annual leave into next year?

Up to 10 days of unused annual leave from your 2020 entitlement, plus any unused 2020 additional annual leave bought through the buying additional annual leave scheme, can be carried over for up to two years, i.e. into 2021 and 2022. This isn’t a change to your terms and conditions and is provided on a discretionary basis to address a particular issue that has arisen in relation to the COVID-19 situation. 

Any employee who carries over annual leave into 2020 and 2021, who subsequently resigns, will be required to take the unused annual leave carried over, during their notice period. It won’t be paid in their final salary.

Please also see the next question, 'how must this carry over annual leave be taken?'.

How must this carry over annual leave be taken?

Any approved annual leave that you carry over from 2020 will need to be taken alongside your full annual leave entitlements for 2021 and 2022.  This will mean that there will need to be some structure to how much, how often and when you take these greater annual leave entitlements, as follows:

  1. Whatever the total of your annual leave carry over, we encourage you to take roughly the same equal amounts during each quarter of 2021 and 2022.  For example, if you carry over 12 days (made up of 10 annual leave days, plus 2 days that you bought through the buying additional annual leave scheme), then you should take 1.5 days each quarter of 2021 and 2020 (12 days/8 = 1.5 days). If you don't use your allocation of carry forward during each quarter of 2021 and 2020, then you'll lose the carry over.
  2. Alongside this, we also encourage you to spread your annual leave entitlement out evenly during each annual leave year, i.e. 2021 and 2022. You should therefore aim to take a least 25% of your usual annual leave entitlement during each quarter of both 2021 and 2020. For example, if your annual leave entitlement is 24 days per year, then you should aim to take at least six days each quarter.

These interim policy positions on annual leave (listed at one and two above) aren't intended to be rigid or inflexible, but to help line managers to allocate fairly the annual leave entitlements of their teams, whilst still adequately delivering services.

All annual leave bookings must be approved in advance by line managers.

I have annual leave booked, but my line manager has recalled me to work to deliver essential or critical services. Should I come into work?

If you’re recalled from annual leave by your line manager, it likely means that you work in an area that’s delivering an essential or critical service to the Island. The impact of the coronavirus pandemic may mean that fewer of your colleagues are at work for a variety of reasons, such as self-isolation or they’re unwell. If you’re recalled to work and you’re not restricted yourself by self-isolation, being unwell, or caring for dependants, then you must come in.

What happens to my holidays if I’m recalled to the workplace during my annual leave and how will I be paid?

If you’re recalled to work during your annual leave you’ll be compensated in line with the collective agreement that applies to your pay group. Where there’sno agreement for your pay group, we’ll compensate you in the following way:

  • your normal basic pay will be maintained
  • your annual leave will be reinstated for the same number of days and hours that you lost because you were recalled to work

We recognise that this may mean you have more annual leave to carry forward to 2021 than the allowed maximum of 10 days. In these exceptional circumstances, this will be allowed.

What happens to my annual leave entitlement if I become unwell with coronavirus, or have to self-isolate while I'm on holiday?

In these circumstances, our current annual leave guidance regarding reinstating annual leave would apply, as follows:

If you’re unwell while you’re on annual leave: 

On-Island

You can claim your annual leave back if you have a medical certificate or proof that you've been hospitalised during your period of annual leave. We recognise that it might not be possible for you to get a sick certificate during a coronavirus outbreak, but you should keep in touch with your line manager and ensure they are up-to-date with your situation.

However, if you haven’t received a positive test result for COVID-19, but need to self-isolate during your annual leave because you’re showing symptoms you can’t claim your annual leave back.

Off-Island

You can claim your annual leave back if you’ve been repatriated back to the Island due to ill health or being hospitalised.

Policy position on annual leave

Read our annual leave policy position.

If I work a bank holiday, will usual bank holiday payments apply?

If you’re rostered to work a bank or public holiday during our response to COVID-19, then you’ll be entitled to be paid normal premium bank holiday rates. However, if you subsequently are unable to work the bank holiday, due to self-isolation or illness, then you would only receive a normal bank holiday payment, i.e. a normal day’s pay. 

Business travel

Should I travel for work?

Non-essential business travel is suspended. 

This includes travel already booked, attendances at training or conferences out of the Island and off-Island school trips.

Essential business travel must be approved by the Director General (or their nominee). Essential business would be events such as accompanying a patient or undertaking a statutory visit to a child in care off-Island.

If you’re an interim or agency worker who travels to Jersey to work, you must speak to your line manager or point of contact in the Government of Jersey to understand if your role and your work has been identified as essential. If it has, you then need to agree whether it’s necessary for the work to be undertaken on-Island or remotely.

If it’s been identified as essential, on-Island work, you’ll be asked to continue to travel to Jersey as usual. Otherwise, we’ll ask you to work remotely from your usual off-Island base.

Travelling to Jersey (safer travel guidance)

If you’re identified as an essential worker, also see the section for essential workers.

Carer responsibilities (dependants)

Working from home while caring for dependants 

We do not anticipate employees to have continuing child carer responsibilities at home and we expect parents whose children have returned to school to now be able to fulfil their full contractual responsibilities whether that be in the workplace or homeworking for those where their line manager has not yet recalled them back into work.

For those who continue to have other carer responsibilities, if the nature of your role allows you to work from home, and it’s appropriate due to the needs of your dependants, we'll need you to do so. This will be to help wherever we can to keep services functioning. In this scenario, discuss with your line manager different ways that you could work flexibly, including working at a different time of the day than you usually would, for example early in the morning or evening.

Also, if you share caring responsibilities within your household, and it’s possible to do so, try and divide the responsibilities between you. We expect that almost all employees will be able to undertake some work and very few will be able to do no work at all.

I can't attend work / can't undertake any work at home because I need to look after a dependant. Do I need to tell anyone?

You must report your absence to your line manager if you’re unavailable to work because you’re at home and caring for dependant(s)due to the level of their needs. Line managers must enter the absence in MyView. 

MyView for Government employees.

During this period, you’ll continue to receive your normal basic pay. We do, however, expect that most employees will be able to undertake some work, for example working flexibly at different times of the day, or if possible, dividing caring responsibilities with another carer within the household.

Essential front line services 

If you share carer responsibilities with anyone else for your dependant and your role delivers essential services, or if you are part of essential front-line services within Health and Community Services, we would ask that you make arrangements where possible with them to share the carer responsibilities to allow you to be available for your role as much as possible.

We do not anticipate a demand from critical workers for childcare. However, if you require assistance, email peoplehub@gov.je in the first instance.

Staff gatherings and social events

If you are considering a staff gathering or social event, you should follow the Public Health advice about gatherings and events. We would like you to show good professional judgement before arranging an event of any kind that includes your work colleagues, being especially mindful where teams have already been split into separate bubbles (for example, A and B Teams) to safeguard the resilience of the service you provide.  Where this has happened, these separate teams should not socialise together.

Coronavirus

An employee has been confirmed as having the virus. Will you close the workplace?

We’ll be guided by the Government of Jersey health protection team and it is likely they’ll come in and do a risk assessment. The workplace could require a deep clean in response, but they’ll advise on this and whether a closure is necessary.

What should we do if somebody becomes unwell at work?

If anyone becomes unwell while working, or a client visiting one or our buildings, and they have symptoms of coronavirus the following steps must be followed:   

(Each building or floor in a building where Government of Jersey is the sole occupant should have a designated area or room with a phone, ideally located near to an exit and which should be easy to clean). Your facilities lead will identify the room. 

  • remove the person to the designated area and keep them at least two metres away from other people. Whenever possible, open the window for ventilation  
  • if possible, the individual should use their own mobile phone to call the coronavirus helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566 giving information about their symptoms and any travel history. Otherwise, they should use the phone provided in the room. They should not call their GP or the Emergency Department unless they’re very unwell and need an ambulance. If an individual is seriously ill and unable to call for themselves, an ambulance must be called (not using the individual’s phone). If known, symptoms and travel history must be given when calling.
  • while waiting for advice from the helpline, the individual should remain two metres away from other people, avoid touching people, surfaces and objects and be advised to cover their nose and mouth with a disposable tissue when they cough or sneeze. Any tissues used should be put in a bag, sealed or tied and then thrown in the bin.
  • if the individual needs to use the toilet while waiting for medical advice, they should use a separate bathroom. No one else must use this bathroom until a terminal clean has taken place.
  • plans should be made by the individual to travel home if they are well enough. 
  • when the individual has vacated the building, Facilities must contact cleaning services to ensure all surfaces that the individual has come into contact with are cleaned. This includes all surfaces and objects that are visibly contaminated with any body fluids and all potentially high contact areas such as toilets, door handles, keyboards and telephones
  • if COVID-19 is confirmed, then the advice on Gov.je about self-isolation should be followed for anyone who has been in contact with the individual

Coronavirus information

A list should be kept of people who have been in direct contact with the individual, including cleaning staff who’ve cleaned the room/any infected areas.

List of items required in rooms

  1. sealable bags
  2. tissues
  3. wipes
  4. sanitiser
  5. spray disinfectant, for example Dettol

Coronavirus symptoms

What should I do if I have coronavirus symptoms?

If you or someone you live with is showing symptoms of coronavirus, you should go into isolation. Check Public Health information about the symptoms and seek advice from the helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566. Do not visit your GP or the hospital, seek advice first.

If you are well enough to do so, and the nature of your role allows, you should work from home.  If it isn't possible for you to work from home, then you'll be entitled to receive your normal basic pay.

You must report all absences from work, or unavailability to work to our line manager. Line managers must enter absence in MyView. Find out how to use MyView for Government employees.

COVID-19 Testing

I need to have a COVID-19 test and the time slot I've been given is during my working day, do I need to make the time up? 

If you need to attend for a COVID-19 test, as part of the Government of Jersey Testing Programme, and the time slot you’ve been given is during your working day, you will not be asked to make the time up.

Display Screen Equipment DSE assessment

Refer to the section working from home.

Essential and critical workers

Essential workers are people engaged in work that is essential to the continued safe running of the Island during the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical workers are a smaller sub-set of essential workers in especially critical roles.

Full list of essential workers

Sub-set list of critical workers

I am an essential (healthcare) worker, do I need to self-isolate when arriving in Jersey?

Anyone arriving in Jersey should follow the guidance published on the gov.je travelling to Jersey page to determine the need for self-isolation.

Flexitime  

Will flexitime schemes continue to operate during the COVID-19 situation?

We’ve had to take the difficult operational decision to suspend all flexitime schemes from Friday, 1 May 2020. Schemes are being suspended because flexitime arrangements are not workable in the current situation and we can’t support employees building up significant amounts of flexitime that may never be able to be taken back, and which we’re not in a position to recompense in other ways.

Therefore:

  1. we’ll honour any flexitime you have already accrued up to and including Thursday, 30 April 2020, but to a maximum of 37.5 hours.  Any accrued flexitime total up to this date should be agreed with your line manager
  2. any hours already accrued above this limit and not taken by Thursday, 30 April 2020 will be lost
  3. you’ll be expected to use any accrued flexitime by Wednesday, 30 September 2020, which has been approved in advance by your line manager. After Wednesday 30 September, any accrued hours that have not been taken will not be carried over further and therefore will be lost
  4. we’re mindful of how hard our employees are working in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and we don’t know how long the response will continue. Consequently, line managers may make the reasonable instruction that you take flexitime/and or short periods of annual leave to supplement your rest days to safeguard your wellbeing and mental health
  5. flexitime will not be substituted by overtime

Flexitime schemes are suspended, do I need to record my hours?

You won't need to record the hours you work while the flexitime scheme is suspended. Line managers will maintain contact with their team members to ensure that no-one is working excessive hours unless absolutely necessary.

When agreeing the time and days that will be worked, there may be opportunity for greater flexibility than previously existed. For example, when working around other commitments, such as caring for children or dependants, if it's operationally feasible, there should be no restriction on when employees work and if work is completed on one day or more than one.

See also the section within these FAQs called Flexible working for more information about different supportive ways of working during this period.

Policy position on flexitime

COVID-19 suspension of flexitime arrangements.

Flexible working

We recognise that many of our employees are now working under very different circumstances. Some will be working from home, trying to also manage the care of dependants and home schooling. Some might still be in the workplace and sharing the care of dependants with spouses or other family members. There are many new things to juggle, which may bring new emotions and stresses.

We all need to adjust our normal working practices to accommodate all of the demands upon us. Line managers should be speaking with you to understand the demands on you, both at work and at home during this unprecedented time.

Together, explore ways of working differently to accommodate these demands. Perhaps that means working in the evening when your children are asleep, or at a different time of day because somebody else in the household has been able to take over the care of dependants when they’ve finished work.

Or discuss with your line manager tasks that are better suited to frequent home interruptions, rather than work which needs an urgent response. Do what work you can, when you can. It’s okay to work differently and flexible or fewer hours - your normal basic pay won’t be affected. Also, try and find some time, however little, for you.

Health, safety and hygiene

You must follow the requirements to maintain hygiene within the workplace, including regular handwashing and use of hand gels if provided. We are all responsible for ensuring that individually we do this, therefore we must challenge colleagues who don’t use hand gels where provided when they enter the workplace. Additional supplies of hand gel should be ordered through Supply Jersey.  

Line managers must update their Covid Safety Plans for their place(s) of work, relevant to the business advice issued by the Government. All risk assessments must be submitted to healthandsafetyhub@gov.je.

Line managers must continue our duty of care by maintaining regular contact with employees who are off work (through isolation, sickness or working from home). 

If your workplace building has a one-way system in place for entering, leaving and circulating around the building, you must follow this system to ensure social distancing.

Healthy working DSE assessment

Refer to the section working from home

Interim and agency workers

I am an interim worker, should I travel to Jersey for work?

If you’re an interim or agency worker who travels to Jersey to work, you must speak to your line manager or point of contact in the Government of Jersey to understand if your role and your work has been identified as essential. If it has, you then need to agree whether it’s necessary for the work to be undertaken on-Island or remotely.

If it’s been identified as essential, on-Island work, you’ll be asked to continue to travel to Jersey as usual. Otherwise, we’ll ask you to work remotely from your usual off-Island base.

Latest travel advice

I am employed through an agency, will I be paid should I become unwell or my usual place of work closes?

If you’ve been engaged to work for us on a temporary assignment through an agency and can’t attend work due to one or more of the scenarios listed below, given the unique circumstances that the coronavirus pandemic presents, we’ll honour your pay, via your agency, for a period of up to two weeks. This would be the case in the following scenarios:

  • you have to self-isolate 
  • you have flu-like symptoms

Be aware however, if you decide to travel off-Island for any reason and subsequently have to self-isolate on your return, we will not honour your pay.

Lone workers: risk assessments

Lone worker risk assessment template

If a member of your team is working alone at a Government of Jersey property their line manager must review the responsibilities listed in the risk assessment guidance, and complete the lone worker risk assessment template.

If you are working alone at home, then your line manager must complete the lone worker risk assessment template. You should also review the responsibility for employees listed in it.

Lone worker risk assessment template

Masks or mouth and nose coverings

Do I need to wear a mask, or mouth and nose covering?

For education settings and Health and Community Services (HCS), the following rules apply.

Wearing of mouth and nose coverings in educational settings, including information regarding exemptions

Additional measures have been adopted within HCS Services with regards to the wearing of surgical face masks and PPE in both clinical and non-clinical settings. You must speak to your line manager to fully understand what is required of you and strictly adhere to the measures that have been implemented. You can read the latest communications from HCS regarding this on the HCS intranet site.

Cloth masks aren’t a substitute for correct PPE, where this has been advised. See our PPE guidance page for more information. Neither is a cloth mask a substitute for strict physical distancing or good hand and respiratory hygiene. 

Where required to do so, you must adhere to these important measures. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action.

Public Health advice about the use of cloth masks 

Clinically extremely vulnerable or at risk from coronavirus

You should read the official guidance for those at a higher risk regarding coronavirus, to understand if you fall into these categories.

If you are at risk, you should complete a  COVID-19 risk assessment together with your manager, to decide if it’s appropriate for you to return to the workplace and whether reasonable adjustments can be made to your role.

If the outcome of the COVID-19 Risk Asessment establishes that you should not come into the workplace and it is not possible for you to work from home, then you will be entitled to receive your normal basic pay. However, we would ask line managers to discuss jointly with individuals in this situation about what work might be possible to undertake at home, even if the nature of their role doesn’t normally lend itself to home working. 

You must report all absences from work, or unavailability to work to your line manager. Line managers must enter absence in MyView. Find out how to use MyView for Government employees.

Arrangements in Health and Community Services are different, refer to your line manager.

Overtime

Am I eligible for overtime during the response to COVID-19?

We understand that during this time, additional hours may have to be worked. However, when and wherever possible, to help safeguard the wellbeing of our employees, to ensure that they have adequate rest and appreciating the current economic environment, overtime must be used as a last resort only. Measures such as rotas, redeployment, new working patterns and other working arrangements must be put in place to avoid employees working additional hours and overtime claims.

Where measures such as those listed above, have been exhausted and overtime can’t be avoided, for instance, in exceptional circumstances only, overtime will only be paid to overtime eligible employees in critical roles where it has been approved in advance by the line manager.  Retrospective overtime claims will not be approved or paid.

What is an overtime eligible employee?

If your current terms and conditions and pay grade allow you to claim overtime, then you are overtime eligible. You can find terms and conditions on the intranet by searching for ‘terms and conditions all pay groups’.

If I have been redeployed to another department, what process should I follow?

The payment of overtime will only be allowed in exceptional circumstances, as described earlier in this section. Regardless of which department you’re working in, if you’re overtime eligible you must follow the overtime process in your department, which includes getting approval in advance before working the overtime.

I am a part-time employee but I am working more than my part time hours at the moment, can I claim additional hours?

If the additional hours you’re working have been approved in advance by your line manager, then you’d be entitled to claim plain time (based on your normal basic pay) for the hours worked, up to a limit of full time hours. 

Pay

What is normal basic pay?

Normal basic pay refers to the salary you’d normally receive each pay day, and includes any permanent contractual payments, such as shift pay and unsocial hours.

If I am redeployed to another role, what will I be paid?

If you’re redeployed to another role to support the delivery of essential services during our response to COVID-19, then you’ll remain on your normal basic pay. Your pay won’t be reduced or increased by working in a different role, for a different department or working a different pattern of hours: you’ll continue to be paid your normal basic pay.

If I am redeployed could I be asked to work different hours to what I normally work?

If you’re redeployed to another role to support the delivery of essential services during our response to COVID-19, you may be asked to work hours that are different to those you normally work, including early starts, late finishes and weekends. Whichever way you are asked to work, your salary will remain the same, i.e. you will continue to receive your normal basic pay with no additional payments for different working patterns. Wherever possible, we’ll look to redeploy current shift workers to undertake work patterns such as those described above.

Policy position on pay

Interim pay policy position.

Personal Protective Equipment PPE guidance

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) guidance for health care and other essential employees working for the Government of Jersey, issued by the Medical Officer of Health has been circulated throughout Health and Community Services, Justice and Home Affairs and Children, Young People, Education and Skills. Speak to your line manager if you haven’t seen this information or have any questions about using PPE, or read our PPE guidance for healthcare professionals and other essential workers.

Pregnancy

I am pregnant, are there any extra measures I should take?

Those who are currently pregnant have been included by the Medical Officer of Health on the list of those who are at moderate risk. If you're pregnant, you should refer to the guidance on gov.je for those at higher risk regarding coronavirus. Your line manager will also need to complete a pregnancy risk assessment.

Who can I contact if I have a question that isn't included here?

If you can't find the answer to your question within this FAQ document, you should email peoplehub@gov.je. We’ll aim to respond to your question as soon as possible.

Risk assessments

I am a manager, when do I need to undertake a risk assessment?

There are a number of scenarios when, as a manager, you’ll be required to undertake a risk assessment.

These are:

  1. if a member of your team is working alone in Government of Jersey premises, undertake a lone worker risk assessment
  2. if a member of your team is working alone at home, undertake a lone worker risk assessment
  3. if a member of your team is pregnant but is needed to attend work, undertake a pregnancy risk assessment
  4. if a member of your team falls into the vulnerable category but is needed to attend work, undertake a COVID-19 risk assessment. Those who are severely vulnerable must remain shielded at home and not attend work. Please see the section about severely vulnerable or vulnerable employees
  5. if a member of your team is living in the same household as somebody who is shielding, undertake a COVID-19 risk assessment
  6. if a member of your team is displaying symptoms of anxiety, depression or stress, undertake a stress risk assessment
  7. if work activity has changed as a result of different ways of working, undertake a general activity risk assessment.

Guidance for managers on Jersey’s safe exit strategy

Self-isolation

Do I need to self-isolate?

There are different groups of people who need to isolate to contain the spread of coronavirus (COIVID-19), this could include:

  1. you're showing symptoms of coronavirus
  2. you've received a positive result for a PCR (swab) test
  3. you've recently travelled to Jersey and are awaiting the outcome of your test(s)
In scenarios 1 and 2, you will be entitled to receive your normal basic pay whilst your isolate.  In the scenario 4, any required isolation should be factored into your leave request. Refer to the section Returning from off-Island Travel, for more detailed information.

Public Health isolation advice

We're facing unprecedented circumstances. All employees must follow the latest isolation guidance that applies to them. Any employee who fails to self-isolate in accordance with the appropriate advice and comes into work, may face disciplinary action. If you're unsure whether to self-isolate, you should get advice from the coronavirus helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566.

What should I do if I am contacted by the Contact Tracing Team?

If you are contacted by the Contact Tracing Team, it is likely you have come into contact with a positive COVID-19 case. The Team will advise you on testing, periods of self-isolation and anything else you are required to do and you should follow their advice. 

Once you have a clear picture of what you must do, please telephone your line manager to up-date them. If you need to self-isolate, you'll be entitled to receive your normal basic pay. If while self-isolating, you're well enough to work from home, and the nature of your role allows you to, then you will need to do so. Your line manager can ask for confirmation that you are required to self-isolate, and the Contact Testing Team will provide a letter for this reason.

If I have a test done, do I have to share the results with my line manager?

No, as this is personal sensitive information.   However, if as a result of the test, you cannot attend work and the nature of your role does not allow you to work from home, your line manager can ask for confirmation of this and the Contact Tracing Team can provide a letter for this reason – which you should share with your line manager.

I need to self-isolate for five days before a medical procedure. Will I be paid?

Currently, individuals needing a medical procedure are asked by Health and Community Services to self-isolate for five days before the procedure.  

If you need to do this, but the nature of your role allows you to work from home, then you’ll need to do so.

If you need to do this, but the nature of your role does not allow you to work from home, then we’ll log this as COVID-19 related sickness absence, but these five days won’t count towards any managing attendance triggers.  You should ask for a confirmation letter from the hospital to confirm your isolation period before your treatment and then a sick certificate for any sickness absence after your procedure.

Self-isolation benefit

Should I make an application for the sickness benefit available from Social Security if I’m isolating?

If you need to self-isolate, and we’re honouring your normal basic pay you must not apply for the isolation (Social Security) sickness benefit available from Customer and Local Services.

Social media

Should I comment on social media and offer opinion about the Government of Jersey’s response to coronavirus?

It can be beneficial for you to like and share official Government of Jersey posts on Facebook or other social media channels, to help distribute official advice throughout the Island, but we also need you to be mindful of your activity on social media, especially during these exceptional times. Make sure that you’re acting within the boundaries of our social media policy and be aware of your responsibilities as a Government employee. 

We expect all employees to abide by the Government of Jersey values when participating in social media activities. You should be polite and respectful of the opinions of others, and not be disrespectful of other Government employees, workers, customers or stakeholders. You need to ensure that you always uphold the Government’s integrity and reputation.

It isn’t acceptable to use social media to complain or negatively comment or offer opinion about Government of Jersey departments or employees. Certain employees are restricted from commenting on Government Policy. These are normally senior managers or those equivalent to above a grade 12. All other employees may make public comments about Government policy, subject to our social media policy for employees.

Refer to our social media policy for more information.

Symptoms

Find Public Health information about coronavirus symptoms and what to do if you have any of them.

Working elsewhere (redeployment)

Could I be asked to work elsewhere within the Government of Jersey to ensure essential services can operate?

During these unique circumstances, you may be needed to work in a different role, or at a different location within the Government of Jersey to ensure the delivery of essential services to the public. 

It's important that you remain flexible during this period and undertake the different role when and where required. We know that our employees will rise to the challenge and provide their skills and experience where it’s needed across the Government. We don’t expect any of our employees to refuse redeployment to support essential services during this time without a legitimate reason. If an employee does refuse, they’ll need to use annual leave or their absence will unpaid.

Where required, a risk assessment will take place, to ensure that individuals who are redeployment are done so safely.

Any necessary training will be provided. Refer to our pay section.

I have some team members that could be redeployed to support essential services, what should I do?

If you're a line manager who now has further employees available that could be redeployed to support essential / critical services across the Government of Jersey, contact resourcing@gov.je.

I’ve been redeployed elsewhere to support an essential service: when and how will I return to my permanent role?

Many employees across the Government of Jersey have been redeployed to support essential services. You should be aware that any employees who have been redeployed to an essential service should remain in this role until an agreed leaving date has been established. This is to ensure that all critical / essential areas of business are maintained safely and appropriately while we exit from lockdown.

If your line manager needs you to return to your permanent role, your manager will need to complete a safe exit redeployment form to request your return and send it to 1GCT@gov.je. The Tactical Coordination Group (TCG) will then review the needs of the essential services role and the needs of the team where the employee has been moved from to assess what action to take.

Working from home

Can I claim expenses incurred while working from home?

We don’t expect you to incur any personal expenses as a result of your working from home during this unprecedented period.

Technology solutions available today should allow you to access our systems without any cost to you. If your department has already had Office 365 rolled out, then you should use Teams to communicate with colleagues. Every department has a Business Enablement Manager (BEM) allocated to them from Modernisation and Digital, and through your line manager, you can make contact with them for advice about helpful solutions available to you and your wider team.

Please be especially mindful of security and data protection requirements when working from home and only use appropriate applications when processing online work, data and voice calls. 

During these unprecedented times, we’re aware that there are a small number of colleagues working from home, who are incurring cost. For example, those who need, as part of their role, to make regular calls outside the Island to procure supplies and services for the Island. In circumstances such as these, or similar, we’ll reimburse reasonable costs incurred. You must get any such expenses authorised by your line manager in advance. If you need to buy equipment to enable you to perform your role at home, then this must also be pre-authorised by your line manager and will remain the property of the Government of Jersey.

You can also visit our coronavirus tax help page for advice about expenses and working from home and your 2020 income tax return.

Are there any guidelines for working from home?

If you’re asked to work from home, please consider the following:

  • if possible, work in a suitable area where you can place your laptop on a table or desk
  • use a supportive chair rather than the sofa
  • if you have a separate keyboard and mouse and they are compatible, use them
  • as you may not have all the recommended equipment when working from home, ensure you take regular breaks to minimise the risk of discomfort
  • remember to keep up handwashing and use wipes on regularly used surfaces.

Working from home can be isolating if you’re used to daily interactions with others in your team and it’s really important that both managers and employees keep in touch on a regular basis. We suggest that you make a regular time each day to make contact and discuss work requirements to keep on track. It’s very important that you create a routine for yourself as if you were coming into work each day. 

Can I take any IT equipment from my usual place of work to use at home?

You should not remove IT equipment from any Government of Jersey premises unless you have been given permission. It’s likely that you have been issued with a laptop, and where needed, a mobile phone, to help you to work at home. You shouldn’t remove any other equipment, including keyboard and mouse, monitors and office chairs removed unless it’s been authorised.

Refer to the section about undertaking a Healthy Workplace DSE assessment, which provide more information regarding the necessary supply of equipment.

If I have an accident when working from home, do I need to report it?

As you’re working from home, you should only report accidents which arise directly from the work activity that you’re carrying out. You should report the accident, near miss or incident using one of the forms listed on MyStates (within the employees/health and safety section). You must also let your line manager know.

Where appropriate, you should also take a photograph and send it to healthandsafetyhub@gove.je including the date and time of the accident.

The Government of Jersey has a duty under the Health and Safety at Work (Jersey) Law 1989 to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of its employees. However, the extent of this is limited when employees are working from home, as only the person working from home has control over, and responsibility for, their home environment.

You can find guidance on homeworking and home safety and there is working from home risk assessment template available on MyStates. 

I’m working from home, do I need to carry out any DSE (Display Screen Equipment) or workstation assessments?

If you continue to work from home, whether on a temporary basis because of COVID-19 or a permanent basis, it’s essential that you carry out a Healthy Working DSE (Display Screen Equipment) assessment. This is an online training and assessment and will take you approximately 45 minutes to complete. You’ll have received an email, on or around 15 June 2020 from Cardinus, asking you to complete this assessment, which may now need reviewing.

If you didn’t receive the email from Cardinus, please contact your department’s Cardinus Administrator as soon as possible. You can find a list of our departmental Cardinus Administrators on our display screen equipment information.

Will I be supplied with equipment as a result of the Healthy Working DSE assessment?

Depending on the outcome of the Healthy Working assessment, you may need some equipment to improve your workstation at home. However, the equipment you’re already using at home could be satisfactory and if this is the case, there’d be no need for us to supply anything additional.

To determine if you need any equipment, please share the results of your Health Working assessment with you line manager. Where equipment is needed, if you’re due to return to the workplace imminently, then equipment will be loaned from your usual place of work. If you’re likely to become a permanent homeworker then equipment will be bought through Supply Jersey for you to use. Your line manager will need to authorise and action this.

You  shouldn’t remove any equipment from your usual place of work, including keyboard and mouse, monitors and office chairs, unless it’s been authorised by your line manager and only where your assessment identifies that it’s needed. It must also be formally logged by your department that an item has been loaned to you.

There may be a small number of cases where it isn’t possible to make the necessary changes to make a workstation safe. In these cases, the individual may need to return to the workplace and should seek advice from the wellbeing team.

I am a line manager: what are my responsibilities around Healthy Working DSE assessments?

You’re responsible for ensuring that every member of your team who’s working from home completes the online Healthy Working DSE assessment. 

You’re also responsible for ensuring that outcomes of the assessments are shared with you and appropriate actions taken, where required.  Depending on the outcomes of each assessment, there may be the need to supply equipment to individual team members.  

Where equipment is needed, if your team member is due to return to the workplace imminently, then equipment will be loaned from their usual workplace. If they’re likely to become a permanent homeworker then equipment will be bought through Supply Jersey for them to use. You’ll need to authorise and action this. You can find further information about obligations to supply equipment on safe working guidance for Government of Jersey home workers, and it is important that you refer to this and read it carefully, so equipment is not purchased unnecessarily.

Members of your team should not remove equipment from their usual place of work, including keyboard and mouse, monitors and office chairs, without your authorisation and only where their assessment identifies that it is needed. Your department must maintain a formal log of all equipment that has been loaned to employees.

There may be a small number of cases where it isn’t possible to make the necessary changes to make a workstation safe. In these cases, the individual may need to return to the workplace. You should also liaise with the wellbeing team.

You have other responsibilities in respect of the Healthy Working DSE assessment and you can find out more on working guidance for Government of Jersey home workers.

What are my confidentiality, data protection and security responsibilities while working from home?

Whether you’re working from home or office-based, your responsibilities regarding confidentiality, data protection and security are no different. In addition to the responsibilities you’ll already be aware of and adhering to, there are some further considerations for home workers, which include ensuring that:

  1. you don’t allow family members or third parties to use or access your work laptop or any other work electronic equipment and applications. This includes not sharing passwords
  2. you’re responsible for keeping all documents and information associated with our business secure at all times, for example in a locked drawer or cupboard. Also, wherever possible, lock your laptop away when you’re not using it
  3. don’t print out documents unnecessarily, otherwise you’ll need to store and dispose of them securely
  4. the screen display of your laptop or monitor can’t be seen by a family member or third party
  5. if you misplace any work information or equipment, or it’s stolen, you must inform your line manager immediately, especially if there’s been a data breach, so that appropriate steps can be taken.

Wellbeing and support

We recognise that the way we are now having to work, which is so different from what we were doing before, can bring about challenges and may at times be stressful. To help ensure the wellbeing of our employees during the coronavirus pandemic, we are providing a variety of measures to provide advice and practical support. This information is posted on www.gov.je/employees to ensure that all of our employees can access it whether at work or at home.

Zero-hour workers

(directly employed by the Government of Jersey)

Will I be offered zero-hours work during the coronavirus pandemic?

Maintaining essential services 

In order to maintain essential services in such areas as Health and Community Services and across the wider Government of Jersey, it’s likely that we will need to ask colleagues who are contracted on zero hours basis to work. If you’re contacted and offered work, and aren’t restricted through self-isolation or an underlying health condition then you should consider making yourself available for work to help us to maintain essential services for the Island.

Any work offered to you would be at your current zero hour pay, terms and conditions.

I am a zero-hour worker but unable to work, will I be paid?

Due to the nature of a zero hours contract those employed on a zero hours basis who can't undertake work would not usually be paid for work that they don't undertake. However, given the unique circumstances that the coronavirus pandemic presents, we'll honour your pay only if you had already been offered or rostered to work a specific shift or number of hours. Please note that this isn't intended to alter your status as a zero-hours worker. In this situation, this would need to be verified by the relevant line manager to guarantee payment. This would be the case in the following scenarios:

  • you have to self-isolate (but does not include if you have to self-isolate after return travel to the Island)
  • care for dependants affected by coronavirus, or due to a school closure and you can't work at all
  • you have an underlying health condition
  • you have flu-like symptoms

If your line manager has confirmed that your pay will be honoured, you’ll need to complete a COVID-19 timesheet, which you can find on MyStates.

If you can’t undertake your regular work (because it can’t be done from home), but you're well, then you should expect to be redeployed into a critical role. Refusal to do so without a valid reason could result in no pay.

I’ve been working in CYPES on a zero-hour basis and my class has been sent home. What is my position regarding being paid and working? 

Colleagues employed on a zero-hours basis who can’t undertake work wouldn’t usually be paid for work that they don’t undertake. However, given the unique circumstances of the coronavirus pandemic, we’ll honour your pay only if you’d been offered or rostered to work a specific shift or number of hours or days. Please note that this isn’t intended to change your status as a zero-hours worker. In this situation, this would need to be verified by the relevant line manager to guarantee payment.

I have been working in CYPES on a zero-hour basis, what is my position regarding being paid and working?

Headteachers/line managers have been asked to action the following for any zero hour worker they had rostered to work during the coming months/this academic year:

  1. a zero-hour worker who has been rostered to work and is continuing to undertake work should continue to complete a standard timesheet
  2. a zero-hour worker who has been rostered to work but is unable to undertake their regular duties (e.g. because of self-isolation or because their work can’t be undertaken from home) will be paid through a COVID-19 timesheet for the period of time rostered to work (up to December 2020). If, however, they can’t undertake their regular work, but they’re well, they should expect to be redeployed into a critical role. Refusal to do so without a valid reason could result in no pay.
  3. those who haven’t been rostered to work during the remainder of this autumn term, won’t be paid. If you fall within this category and need further advice or clarification, please email peoplehub@gov.je.

In respect of number 2 above, refer to the section Working elsewhere (redeployment).

Your headteacher or line manager should have made contact with you.

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