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Baby / child immunisations

From 6 January 2014 the routine childhood immunisation schedule will include a vaccine to protect babies against rotavirus infection.

​​Routine baby and childhood immunisations

Your baby / child will be offered a range of vaccinations between the ages of 2 months and 14 years. It is very important that your child is registered for the immunisation programme so that they don't miss any vaccinations.

You should visit your GP surgery for baby and childhood immunisations.

These visits will be free of charge.This also applies to the six-week developmental check for babies. 

Baby six-week developmental check

Immunisation programme

The table below shows the age at which babies / children are offered various immunisations.

If you have questions regarding childhood immunisation, please talk to your health visitor or general practitioner (GP). Alternatively you can contact the Immunisation Nurse Specialist.

​When to immunise​Diseases being protected against​How vaccine is given
​8 weeks 
(1st primary)
​Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib)​1 injection (Pediacel)
​Pneumoccol infection​1 injection (Prevenar)
​Rotavirus​By mouth (Rotarix)
12 weeks 
(2nd primary)​ ​ ​
​Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib)​1 injection (Pediacel)
​Meningitis C​​1 injection (Menjugate or Neis Vac-C)
​Rotavirus​By mouth (rotarix)
16 weeks 
(3rd primary)​ ​
​Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib)​1 injection (Pediacel)
​Pneumococcal infection​1 injection (Prevenar)
Between 12 and 13 months of age ​​Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) and Meningitis C booster​1 injection (Menitorix)
​Pneumococcal infection booster​1 injection (Prevenar)
​Measles / mumps / rubella (1st dose)​1 injection (Priorix or MMR Vaxpro)
3 years, 4 months (or soon after)​ ​​Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio booster​1 injection (Repevax or Infanrix-IPV)
​Measles / mumps / rubella (2nd dose)​1 injection (Priorix or MMR VaxPRO)

Injections given in school

​Age​Gender​School year​Diseases being protected against​How vaccine is given
​12 to​ 13​GirlsYear 8​​Cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18​3 separate injections of Gardasil given over a 6 month period
​13 to 14 ​​Boys and girls ​​Year 9​Tetanus, diphtheria, polio booster​1 injection (Revaxis)
​Meningitis C booster (from Sept 2013)*​1 injection (Meningitec, Menjugate or Neis Vac-C)

Table updated December 2013

*If a child has received a MenC dose since reaching 10 years of age the booster in school year 9 is not required.​​

Rotavirus vaccine​

HPV vaccine (cervical cancer)​

Detailed information about childhood immunisation is available on the NHS Choices website. Links to information on the NHS Choices website about individual vaccines and illnesses are also available below:

NHS Choices website
Diphtheria on NHS Choices website
Tetanus on NHS Choices website
Whooping cough on NHS Choices website
Polio on NHS Choices website
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) on NHS Choices website
Pneumococcal infections on NHS Choices website
Gastroenteritis (rotavirus) in children on NHS Choices website
Meningitis - NHS Choices
Measles on NHS Choices website
Mumps on NHS Choices website
Rubella on NHS Choices website
HPV cervical cancer vaccine on NHS Choices website​

Register your child for the immunisation programme

I have just had a new baby. Do I need to register my baby for the immunisation programme?

If your baby was born in Jersey your child will be registered by the maternity unit on the child health computer system. You will be sent a reminder letter by post when an immunisation visit is due.

My baby was born outside of Jersey. Do I need to register them for the immunisation programme?

If your baby / child was born outside of Jersey, you should register with a GP as soon as you arrive in Jersey. Your GP surgery will notify the child health team that you are living in Jersey and you will be sent a reminder letter when any immunisations are due.

My child received immunisations in the UK / elsewhere. Do I need to register them for the immunisation programme?

Yes. You should register with a GP as soon as you arrive in Jersey. You should take your parent held record (red book) or any immunisation records to your GP surgery when you first attend.

Your GP will tell you if your child needs any further immunisations. They will also notify the child health team that you are living in Jersey and you will be sent a reminder letter when any immunisations are due.

What should I do if I change my address?

You should make sure that both your GP and health visitor are aware of your child’s new address (and your contact telephone numbers). Your GP or health visitor will inform the child health team of your child’s new address to make sure immunisation reminders reach you.

Taking your baby / child for immunisations

Will I get a reminder when my baby / child is due an immunisation?

Yes. You will receive a reminder letter in the post on each occasion when your child is due their immunisations at 2, 3, 4, and 12 months of age and at 3 years, 4 months of age.

Where should I take my baby / child for immunisations?

You should take your child to your GP surgery to be immunised. The immunisation visits will be free of charge.

Will I have to pay for the 6-week check visit or for immunisation visits at my GP practice?

No. The Health and Social Services department will pay your GP for the immunisation visits and for the vaccines when your child is aged 2, 3, 4, and 12 months of age and at 3 years 4 months of age so you will not have to pay. We are doing this because immunisations ensure your child is protected from potentially serious infectious diseases.

What if I have been on the Island less than 6 months? Will I have to pay anything?

Even if you have been on the Island less than 6 months, Health and Social Services will still pay your GP for administering the immunisations, for the vaccines and for performing the 6-week check. However, if you have been in Jersey less than 6 months and you do not have a valid health card, your GP will not be able to claim the health insurance rebate from Social Security on your behalf. Your GP may pass that cost on to you. Please check with your GP.

School age immunisations

My child is at school. Will they be due any immunisations?

Yes. Girls are offered immunisations in year 8, boys and girls in year 9. In year 8, girls are offered the HPV vaccine to protect against cervical cancer.

In year 9, girls and boys are offered two injections - the first is a booster to extend their protection against diphtheria / tetanus / polio and the second is a booster to extend their protection against meningococcal C disease.

You will receive information about these immunisations and a consent form to complete when these immunisations are due.

The vaccinations for school age children are given in school by the school nurses. They are very experienced in giving injections to pupils and they are particularly mindful that some children may be nervous. If you or your child have any worries, please discuss this with the immunisation nurse specialist or with the school nurses.

Are the vaccines given in school free?

Yes.

Can I take my school age child to my GP for the immunisations?

You will need to make special arrangements with your GP (this is because GP practices do not stock the vaccines that are given in school.) It is likely that your GP practice will charge you for the consultations. Your GP should also charge you for the HPV (cervical screening) vaccination.



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