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Government of Jerseygov.je

Information and public services for the Island of Jersey

L'înformâtion et les sèrvices publyis pouor I'Île dé Jèrri

Keeping and moving livestock

​​​​​​​​There are many regulations around the management of livestock. Including imports and exports of farm animals and animal semen (germplasm), artificial insemination and notifiable diseases. These rules are in place to ensure the animals' welfare and protect diseases from entering our Island.

The animal welfare code contains important regulations and guidelines.

Notifiable and reportable animal diseases

Report a notifiable disease

Notify us immediately
  • If you suspect that an animal has a notifiable disease you're legally required to call the States Veterinary Officer on +44 (0) 1534 441600.

You must inform us because these diseases may:

  • be passed between animals and people
  • have a significant economic impact

If your animal is unwell but you do not suspect a notifiable disease, you should contact your private veterinary surgeon. To know which disease you must report check the notifiable and reportable animal diseases.

Poultry

Diseases and infections

There's a number of notifiable animal diseases or infections your poultry may catch. The most common in Jersey is avian flu.

You must notify us if you suspect your animal has a notifiable disease. Find more information on the list of notifiable animal diseases.

If your animal is unwell but you do not suspect a notifiable disease, you should contact your private veterinary surgeon.

Keeper's registration

You must register as a poultry keeper if you own or are responsible for 30 birds or more. This includes all types of:

  • chickens
  • turkeys
  • ducks
  • geese
  • guinea fowl
  • partridges
  • pheasants
  • pigeons
  • quail
  • peacocks
  • swans

We do not need to know about parrots, budgerigars or other aviary birds.

If you have less than 30 birds, registration is voluntary. However we encourage keepers with any number of poultry to register because of the risk of bird flu.

Registration is important so if there's a disease outbreak we can:

  • communicate with you quickly
  • help you manage the disease
  • target resources where they are needed most

You must register if you stock poultry only for part of the year or if you keep them in your garden. This also applies to all poultry that are reared or kept in captivity:

  • as family pets for showing or breeding
  • to produce meat or eggs for consumption
  • to produce other commercial products
  • to restock supplies of game

Apply to register

Complete your application form and send it by email to rva@gov.je.

You'll need to provide details on every place where you keep poultry, including:

  • specialist buildings
  • fields
  • gardens
  • ponds
Tell us within 1 month if any of your details change.

Application form to register as a poultry keeper

Records keeping and movements

As a poultry keeper you must keep records of: 

  • the address of your premises
  • each species of bird entering or leaving your premises and the number of birds of that species
  • the name and address of the person the birds were obtained from
  • the arrival date of the birds on your premises and departure date
  • the birds' destination when leaving your premises (if known)
  • the name and address of the person the birds were transferred to
  • the reason why the birds left your premises

For birds leaving your premises you must keep their records for at least 12 months from the date they leave.

You may need to provide your records to an inspector upon request and you should use this form to record any movements.

Movement of poultry record sheet

Imports of animals and hatching eggs

You can import poultry and hatching eggs into Jersey from:

  • the UK
  • Isle of Man
  • other Channel Islands

To import poultry you must complete the application for importation and the biosecurity checklist.

Application for importation of poultry to Jersey

Biosecurity checklist for import poultry

The checklist provides a schematic housing site plan and photographs to show that you're able to house imported birds for a minimum of 30 days.

Once completed, email your documents to rva@gov.je. Make sure you send this information at least 10 working days before your planned import.

You must also complete the imports notification form at least 1 working day before the animal is due to arrive in Jersey.

Additional requirements for commercial imports

If you're importing poultry you must meet the import conditions:

  • if disease has been confirmed, you cannot import poultry from a Protection Zone (PZ) of 3 kilometres and Surveillance Zone (SZ) of 10 kilometres. See Council Directive 2005/94/EC
  • before leaving the export premises, the outside of the transport vehicle must be clean, disinfected, and free of any visible contamination such as mud, faeces or excretion
  • the vehicle wheels and wheel arches must be cleaned and disinfected after loading and before leaving the premises with an approved disinfectant. Any crates or boxes must be clean and disinfected prior to loading
  • exporters must comply with the welfare laws relating to the exporting country and transport birds in a suitable container. If transported by air, they must meet International Air Transport Association (IATA) standards
  • after importation, the birds must be kept at the destination declared in the licence and custody of the birds must not be transferred within 30 days
  • all imported birds shall be housed for a minimum of 30 days
  • except when prior written approval has been given by the States Veterinary Officer no movements of any live poultry off the premises is permitted during the 30 days after importation
  • you must make sure that good biosecurity and hygiene practices are in place at all times to protect the birds. This includes isolating new stock and minimising the risk of disease occurring or spreading

Other conditions may apply and be included on the licence.

If you want to import poultry from other destinations, email rva@gov.je.

Horses

Diseases and infections

There is a number of notifiable animal diseases your horse may catch. You must notify us if you suspect that your animal has a notifiable disease.

List of notifiable animal diseases

There are diseases which are not notifiable diseases such as:

Horse passports

When you need a horse passport

You need a horse passport (also known as equine passport) if you export or travel outside of Jersey with your:

  • horse
  • pony
  • donkey

You don't need a passport if your horse is staying in Jersey.

Apply for a horse passport

You need to apply for a horse passport through a Passport Issuing Organisation (PIO). There are no horse passport issuing authorities in Jersey.

Getting and using a horse passport on GOV.UK

If you sell your horse

If your horse has a passport you must give the passport to the new owner. The new owner must contact the PIO within 30 days to update the passport ownership details.

If you're selling your horse outside of the Channel Islands you need a horse passport.

When your horse dies

You must return the passport within 30 days of your horse's death to the PIO that originally issued it. If you want to keep the passport, the PIO may be able to return it to you after they have updated their records.

Update or replace a passport

For updates in your details or replace a lost passport, contact the PIO that issued your horse's passport of any changes to your details.​

PIOs that have stopped trading

If the PIO that issued your horse's passport has stopped trading you can use another PIO to update your passport.

Multiple horse passports

You should only have 1 valid passport for each horse you own.

It can happen that some horses have 2 passports. In this case, the owner can choose which passport to keep. For example, you may want to keep a pedigree passport because it includes important breeding information.

Section IX of the passport

In Section IX of your horse's passport you declare if your horse is intended or not for human consumption. You may have to sign your horse out of the food chain if your horse is given certain medicines, your private vet can advise you.

Once you declare that your horse is not intended for human consumption it can never be changed. Contact your vet or PIO for advice.

Section IX must be present in your horse's passport if you travel or export your horse to the EU or rest of the world. It does not have to be signed before departure. However, we cannot issue an Export Health Certificate without this section being in the passport.

If your horse's passport was issued before 28 February 2005, it will not have Section IX. You'll need to contact your PIO to have the passport updated.

Medicines to record in the passport

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate provides a list of which medicines must be recorded in your horse's passport. If you don't have the passport with you when your horse is being treated your vet may be restricted on the range of medicines they can use.

Horse medicines and record keeping requirements on GOV.UK

Your vet should always check the declaration in Section IX before treating your horse with certain medicines. Whether or not your horse is declared as intended for human consumption determines what medicines your vet can administer and the records that must be kept.

Passports issued by the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI)

If your horse's passport was issued by the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI), contact them to check that the passport meets current requirements.

British Equestrian Federation

Travels between Jersey and Great Britain  

Your horse must have a passport if travelling to:

  • England
  • Scotland
  • Wales

Find more guidance and apply for a horse passport on GOV.UK.

If it's a definite import of horse to the Island, you may need to declare your import to customs and pay GST.

Travels between Jersey and Guernsey

Movements from Guernsey to Jersey is not restricted. No licence is required however, your horse must have an equine passport.

If it's a definite import of horse to the Island, you may need to declare your import to customs and pay GST.

To travel to Guernsey your horse needs a General Import Licence. See guidance for equine movements on the States of Guernsey.

Travel between Jersey and the EU

You need to:

  • comply with customs requirements
  • meet welfare during transport regulations
  • have a veterinary export health certification. The ceritificate depends on the category of movement​

Bringing a horse into Jersey

All horses travelling to Jersey from the EU must have a British Export Health Certificate and meet all the requirements of the general licence issued by the Minister for the Environment.

The general licence may be reviewed and the conditions may change. So each time you import a horse you must make sure they have the most update version accompanying them.

Taking a horse to the EU 

Specific equine health certificates have been agreed for horses travelling to the EU.

All horses must travel to the EU with an Export Health Certificate and enter the EU via a Border Control Post (BCP). You'll need an agent in the EU to notify the BCP on your behalf and make sure customs notifications are made.

There may also be a requirement for additional blood tests to be carried out within 30 days of travel to the EU. Total preparation time may take up to 6 weeks.

You'll need additional welfare in transport authorisations to transport within the EU. For unregistered horses, you may need a journey log issued in the destination country. See the guidance below for more information.

Travels between Jersey and the rest of the world

If your horse is coming from the rest of the world it will need to meet the UK's import conditions and enter via an approved UK Border Control Post (BCP). For more information email rva@gov.je.

If if's a definite import of horse to the Island, you may need to declare your import to customs and pay GST.​

Movements categories

Definitive import or export

This option is for consignments intended to be placed under the customs procedure ‘release for free circulation’ in the destination jurisdiction.

This is the only option for unregistered horses.

Re-entry (registered horses only)

Only use this option for animals authorised for re-entry, such as registered horses for racing, competition and cultural events re-entering after their temporary export (less than 30 days).

Temporary admission (registered horses only)

Only use this option for animals authorised for temporary moves, such as registered horses for a period of less than 90 days.

Imports from the EU, including the Republic of Ireland

To permanently import a horse from the EU or the Republic of Ireland you need:

  • a horse passport
  • the relevant health certificate. See guidance on equine health certificates on GOV.UK. The EU vet will issue 1 of the following for:
    • re-entry horses GBHC660 EQU-R
    • registered horses GBHC661 EQU-REG
    • unregistered horses GBHC662 EQU-UNR
  • blood sampling, if required. Discuss this in advance with your EU vet
  • a general licence to import horses from the EU

General licence to import horses from the EU

You must also complete the imports notification form at least 1 working day before the animal is due to arrive in Jersey and declare your import to customs and pay GST. 

You'll need to give your customs declaration number to your EU vet so they can complete the certificate for entry into Jersey.

We review and update the conditions on our General Licence. Make sure you use the latest version each time you bring a horse into Jersey.

Exports to the EU, Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

Check the requirements of the country you'll be entering for their latest guidance.

All horses, ponies and donkeys must have: 

  • a valid horse passport with a completed Section IX
  • been certified by an official veterinarian (OV) for export, who has seen the passport
  • a valid export health certificate
  • a supplementary document issued by the OV in the case of unregistered horses
  • a welfare declaration, special rules for horses and ponies on GOV.UK
  • declaration by Captain or Master of the ship or aircraft and attached to the health certificate​

Export health certificate

As an exporter you must apply to Natural Environment for an export health certificate by completing the application form below.

We can take up to 10 working days to process your application. It's intended to get the certificate to your certifying official veterinarian 5 days before export.

Before you submit your application, you should check with your certifying official veterinarian if you have completed it correctly and if they can carry the required work in time for the export.

The premises of origin and destination must be registered. We will not accept an application without this information. For any premises that are not registered you need to complete a premises application at least 5 working days before applying for the certificate.

Premises registration application

Each export health certificate costs £70.

Horse export health certi​​ficate application form

Find guidance to help you complete the application on find an export health certificate on GOV.UK.

Customs proc​​ess for imports and exports

If this is a definitive export your agent who manages the BCP procedures for the health checks will also need to make a normal customs entry using the Import Control System (ICS). 

For temporary imports it's possible to use an ATA carnet (the carte vert). You must get this in advance of entry. For these temporary exports, the customs process (leaving the EU and entering Jersey) is also covered by the ATA carnet.

Going to the EU with a trailer or horse box

If you go to the EU with a trailer or horse box, you need additional welfare in transport authorisations. See guidance on export of move live animals on GOV.UK and driving in Europe.

Also check with the authorities of the country you're going to and any countries you'll be transiting for any other welfare during transport requirements.

Grazing regulations in Jersey

You're only allowed to graze horses on some land and fields. Learn where your horse can graze and what land meet horse grazing regulations.

Cattle

Diseases and infections

There's a number of notifiable animal diseases or infections your cattle may catch. In Jersey, the most common are bluetongue and foot and mouth.

List of notifiable animal diseases

You must notify us as notifiable diseases may be passed between animals and people or have a significant economic impact.

If your animal is unwell but you do not suspect a notifiable disease, you should contact your private veterinary surgeon.

Keeper's registration

If you keep cattle you must:

  • be registered as a keeper
  • ensure all your animals are correctly identified
  • comply with movement requirements

Your application to register as a keeper will be processed by the Jersey Cattle Movement Service (JCMS). The JCMS:

  • issue your holding numbers
  • issue your registers
  • obtain your ear tags

A fee may be charged by the JCMS for registration.

We will hold a copy of all your data details at the department.

Application form to register as a keeper of cattle 

Records keeping

As the registered keeper you must keep a register. The register must be in the following format approved by the Minister.

Farm register to record notifiable events for cattle

In the register, you must record the:

  • birth of all animals within 7 days
  • death of all animals within 7 days
  • movement of all animals to another holding within 36 hours of the movement taking place

You must report the birth of an animal to the JCMS within 7 days. The JCMS will provide a registration card for you to record the required details. They'll also issue a registration certificate for your calf.

When an animal dies, you need to complete the reverse of the registration certificate and return it to the JCMS within 7 days.

The registration certificate is a legal document and you must keeo it safe. If a certificate is lost, stolen or destroyed you must notify the JCMS within 14 days of becoming aware.

The Animal Health and Welfare Team is obliged to carry out on-the-spot inspections to make sure you meet these requirements.

Identification of animals

All your cattle must be identified and double tagged with a tag in each ear. You must:

  • apply the first ear tag within 36 hours of birth
  • apply the second ear tag within 20 days of birth
  • both ear tags must be  applied before your cattle are moved off the holding

If you find that an ear tag is missing, you must replace it with a tag bearing the same number within 28 days.

You should order more ear tags as needed from JCMS.

The ear tags show the letters 'UK' followed by a 6 digit number unique to your holding premises and a 6 digit individual number.

Movements of cattle

Before moving an animal from your holding you must:

  • correctly identified the animal with an official tag in each ear 
  • make sure the keeper receiving the animal have a holding number. You must record this number when you register the movement in you register
  • make sure you record the movement in your register within 36 hours of the movement taking place
  • send the completed signed registration certificate to the JCMS informing them of the movement and change of keeper within 7 days

Semen regulations

The process of semen collection is closely regulated. You must be licenced or approved by the department if you or your business are involved in semen:

  • collection
  • processing
  • storage
  • distribution

Storage of semen

If you want to store semen on your farm you need approval from the Animal Health and Welfare Team.

Application form to store bovine semen on a farm

Your semen tank must be inaccessible to livestock and stored in a locked room, locked cupboard or similar. It cannot be stored in the dairy.

Semen storage tank and insemination equipment must be stored hygienically.

You must keep record of:

  • semen deliveries, including:
    • supplier
    • date
    • number of straws
  • semen use, including:
    • date and ID of cow or heifer inseminated
    • bull used
    • collection batch number
    • name of inseminator
  • any abnormal calf produced from artificial insemination
  • date and quantity of nitrogen deliveries

Semen imports and exports

Semen imported from the British Islands or the EU must be stored in an approved EC storage centre. The semen needs to be accompanied by an animal health certificate. 

You must complete the imports notification form at least 1 working day before the animal is due to arrive in Jersey.

For information on paying GST for imported goods.

Semen exported to the British Islands or the EU must have:

  • have been collected, processed and quarantined at an approved EC collection centre
  • have been stored at an approved EC storage centre
  • be accompanied by an animal health certificate

DEFRA approved bovine semen collection centres

Artificial insemination (AI) 

See guidance and regulations on artificial insemination (AI).

Testing programme

Many years of evidence show Jersey's cattle population is free from:

  • bovine tuberculosis
  • brucellosis
  • EBL
  • IBR

The current testing programme is well underway.

Testing program to achieve official free status for all Jersey's cattle herds 

Bees (Apis mellifera)

Diseases and infections

There is a number of notifiable animal diseases or infections your bees may catch. In Jersey, the most common is American foulbrood.

List of notifiable animal diseases

As a beekeeper you must make sure that you inspect the brood regularly and report any suspicion of notifiable disease to the States Veterinary Officer.

Declarations of special measures

The Minister for the Environment has reasonable grounds to suspect the existence of small hive beetle (Aethina tumida) in:

  • Réunion, an overseas territory of France
  • the region of Calabria, Italy
  • the region of Sicily, Italy

Entry into Jersey is suspended for the following products originating in or dispatched from these places as they could pose risk to human or animal health:

  • honeybees
  • bumble bees
  • unprocessed apiculture by-products
  • used beekeeping equipment
  • apiculture products in honeycomb intended for human consumption
Declaration of special measures for Réunion, 5 June 2023

Declaration of special measures for Italy, 18 January 2023

Keeper's registration

You must be registered with the department if you own a hive with bees or a hive which has at any time contained a colony of bees.

Complete the registration form immediately and within at least 28 days of becoming a hive owner.

Beekeeper registration form

Diseases of Animals (Bees) (Jersey) Order 2013 on Jersey Law

How to encourage bees into your garden

Imports of honeybees

You can only import honeybees into Jersey from:

  • elsewhere in the British Isles
  • the EU
  • other eligible countries outside the EU

Imports from the British Isles

You can import honeybees into Jersey if you met the conditions set out in the general import licence.

You'll have to apply to Animal Health and Welfare at Natural Environment to have your apiary approved for isolation prior to import.

All honeybee imports must also be accompanied by an official health certificate. You can get a health certificate from the relevant authority. You should keep your health certificate for 12 months after the arrival of the consignment.

General licence for the import of honeybees to Jersey from British Islands

Example of isolation premises approval certificate for bees

Imports from the EU

You can import queen bees with up to 20 attendants into Jersey from the EU as American foulbrood, Small hive beetle and Tropilaelaps mite are all notifiable throughout the EU. The Calabria and Sicily regions of Italy are unable to export due to safeguard measures imposed for an outbreak of Small hive beetle. Import of packages, nucleus or full colonies are not permitted. 

You’ll have to apply to the animal health and welfare section at Natural Environment for a specific import licence and to have your apiary approved for isolation.

Example of isolation premises approval certificate for bees

Once you have a licence you can import queen bees into Jersey providing the bees satisfy the health requirements applicable from the EU. 

All queen bee imports must also be accompanied by an official health certificate on ‘Model QUE’ for queen honeybees and queen bumble bees available from GOV.UK. This must be an original certificate as we do not accept photocopies.

Bees: model health certificates on GOV.UK

The health certificate must be issued by the relevant authority in the country of origin no more than 24 hours before despatch. It’s valid for 10 days from the date of issue.

Health certificate conditions

Queen honeybees must: 

  • come from a territory in which AFB, Small hive beetle and Tropilaelaps mites are notifiable throughout the whole territory
  • come from a breeding apiary which is supervised and controlled by the competent authority
  • come from an area which is not the subject of any restrictions associated with an occurrence of AFB and where no such occurrence has taken place within at least 30 days prior to the issue of the present certificate. Where an outbreak has occurred previously, all hives within a 3 kilometres radius must have been checked by the competent authority and all infected hives burned or treated to the satisfaction of the competent authority within 30 days of the last recorded case
  • come from hives (or colonies in the case of bumble bees) from which samples of the comb have been tested and found negative in the last 30 days for AFB as laid down in the OIE Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals
  • come from an area of at least 100 kilometres radius which is not the subject of any restrictions associated with the occurrence of the Small hive beetle or the Tropilaelaps mite and where these infestations are absent
  • have undergone detailed examinations to ensure that all bees and packaging do not contain Small hive beetle or their eggs or larvae, or other infestations in particular Tropilaelaps mites affecting bees
  • come from hives (or colonies in the case of bumble bees) which were inspected immediately prior to despatch and show no clinical signs or suspicions of disease including infestations affecting bees
  • ensure that the packing material, queen cages, accompanying products and food are new and have not been in contact with diseased bees or brood combs and all precautions have been taken to prevent contamination with agents causing diseases or infestations of bees

When received the queen must be transferred to a new cage. You must not use the queen cage provided by the exporter to introduce your queens. You must send the original cages, attendant worker bees and other material that accompanied the queen bees from their country of origin to Natural Environment within 5 days. The material will be examined for the presence of notifiable pests and diseases.

With your parcel include your: 

  • name
  • address
  • contact number
  • import licence number

Make sure they are suitably packed for the postal service.

You can get a health certificate from the relevant authority. You should retain your health certificate for 12 months after the arrival of the consignment.

Imports from other eligible countries outside the EU 

You should contact Natural Environment if you want to import from outside the EU to discuss which eligible countries imports are allowed from. This may only be from New Zealand at the moment.

Notification of imports

You must notify us before the arrival of your bees' consignment by completing an Importer notification form.

After you have submitted the notification form, we'll contact you for an inspector to arrange a visit.

Importer notification form

Fireblight (Erwinia amylovora)

Fireblight is a plant disease spread by bees and other pollen or nectar gathering insects. Jersey is free from Fireblight and is a Fireblight protected zone.

If you're importing or exporting bee packages and hives into EU designated fireblight protected zones between 15 March and 30 June, you must comply with the control measures set out in the Plant Health Directive (2000/29/EC).

To protect Jersey from fireblight you must provide evidence that the bees or hives you're importing have either:

  • originated from an EU fireblight protected zones
  • originated from another eligible country outside the EU recognised free from fireblight
  • undergone an appropriate quarantine measure restricting foraging activity at least 48 hours before arrival

Sale of bees

You should keep records of beekeepers you sale any imported bees to. This will help us contact the new owner quickly in the event of any pests or diseases being found in the imported consignment.

Pigs

Diseases and infections

There is a number of notifiable animal diseases or infections your pigs may catch. In Jersey, the most common is foot and mouth.

List of notifiable animal diseases

You must notify us if you suspect that your animal to have a notifiable disease.

If your animal is unwell but you do not suspect a notifiable disease, you should contact your private veterinary surgeon.

Keeper's registration

You must be registered as a keeper if you keep pigs as pets or intended for the abattoir.

Your application to register will be processed by the Jersey Cattle Movement Service (JCMS). They will:

  • issue your holding numbers
  • issue your registers
  • obtain your ear tags

A fee may be charged by the JCMS for your registration.

We will hold a copy of all your data details at the department.

Application form to register as a pig keeper

Introductory letter for pig keepers​​

Records keeping

Record keeping is important because if a notifiable disease is confirmed we'll need to know:

  • how many animals you have
  • ear tag numbers
  • any movements

As a pig keeper you must record in a register approved by the Minister within 36 hours of the event of:

  • births
  • deaths
  • movements on and off your holding
  • ear tagging events
  • the total number of livestock on your holding at any time

You can keep a paper or electronic version with a backup. In the sheet template below we have prepared 2 pages. The first is an example to help you complete the second page which is a template.

It’s important you record your running total so if we ask you how many animals you have, you can tell us immediately.

A keeper must keep an entry in the register for 6 years after the entry is made and make it available to an inspector on demand.

Pigs record sheet template

Identification of animals

All your pigs should be identified with ear tags and slap marks. The JCMS can order ear tags and slap mark equipment for you if needed. This will be at an additional cost.

You must make sure your pigs are correctly identified with an ear tag in each ear identifying your holding and a unique number before they are moved off your holding.

Ear tags 

All animals have to be double ear tagged before they are 6 months old or in any case before they are moved off the holding. This exclude pigs raised on the holding of birth which go directly to the abattoir before they reach 1 year of age.

You should order ear tags as needed from Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society (RJA&HS).

The ear tags show the letters UK followed by:

  • a 5 digit number unique to your holding premises
  • a 2 digit species identifier pigs 03
  • an individual number made of 5 digits

Ear tags for each species of animal are different in size and shape and possibly colour, but they will not be red.

A pig under 12 months of age consigned to the abattoir must have a slap mark on both shoulders showing the holding number or at least 1 ear tag which has the Jersey area code UK03 and the holding number or be double ear tagged if over 12 months of age.

Imports of animals

Pigs can be imported into Jersey from the UK or Guernsey. You must have a licence issued by the Department of the Environment and an Export Health Certificate.

Imports are subject to a strict set of criteria designed to stop certain animal diseases entering the Island. This can take several months to complete.

Your supplier (exporter)

It’s very important that your supplier contacts the local animal health authorities before attempting to export the pigs in order to:

  • get a copy of the Export of Pigs for Breeding and Production to Jersey and the Bailiwick of Guernsey Health Certificate (6305EHC)
  • get the Notes for the Guidance of Exporters and the Official Veterinarian (6305NFG) so they know what is required
  • be aware Jersey will not accept pigs identified only with a tattoo

The supplier must apply to the Animal & Plant Health Agency (APHA) UK for an Export of Pigs for Breeding and Production to Jersey and the Bailiwick of Guernsey Health Certificate (6305EHC).

Suppliers must comply with the UK welfare laws relating to the export of animals. Welfare conditions during transport are laid down by Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005. The transporter should contract their own authorities to find out the requirements.

Get a copy of the specimen health certificate and guidance on exports: animals and animal by products on APHA.

Pre-export isolation premises

All animals for export must be held in isolation on the premises of origin, or other suitable premises, for at lease 21 days prior to export.

Exporters should be reminded that before the Official Veterinarian (OV) can approve premises, the following conditions must be met:

  • the isolation accommodation must comprise of an airspace separate from any airspace in which any other livestock are present, and be as remote as possible from any other livestock
  • the interior of the isolation building must be capable of being thoroughly cleansed and disinfected
  • it must be cleansed and disinfected using an approved disinfectant immediately before the animals to be exported are placed there
  • no drainage or effluent produced by, or derived from, other livestock may pass through the isolation accommodation
  • any person needing to enter the isolation accommodation must first put on overalls and boots reserved exclusively for use in the isolation accommodation
  • a footbath containing a Defra approved disinfectant, diluted in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, must be located at the entrance. Any person entering must first wash and disinfect their boots using the footbath

Your responsibilities as the importer

You should allow yourself and the Department of the Environment plenty of time to prepare if you wish to import pigs into the Island.

You must contact the States Veterinary Officer (SVO) to arrange a suitable time to certify your isolation premises. If the inspection proves adequate, the SVO will issue a Quarantine Premises Approval Certificate.

An Official Veterinarian (OV) in the UK must inspect the animal(s) and carry out any required tests and enquiries.

You'll need to meet the following conditions before the pigs arrive in Jersey:

  • you’ll need to hold an official import licence 
  • you’ll need to have an export health certificate, as detailed above
  • as the pigs will have to go into isolation upon arrival, the field or premises will need to be approved beforehand

All required documentation and certification must be completed correctly.

Application for an official import licence for pigs

Conditions of import for pigs

Code of practice isolation premises for imported livestock

When your pigs arrive in Jersey

The animals will have to go into isolation on arrival and be tested for a number of diseases.

You must make sure that:

  • your premises or field have been approved by the SVO where the pigs will isolate for at less 3 weeks
  • you have suitable handling facilities so that the pigs can be hands-on examined and you can give assistance

Isolation premises for animal imports

Moving pigs from isolation premises

You cannot move the animals from the isolation premises until the SVO confirms the release in writing.

If for any reason the pigs have to be moved prior to the end of the isolation period, the SVO must approve the new premises before the animals can be moved.

Semen regulations

Importing semen for artificial insemination (AI) is an alternative to importing live pigs.

If you plan to import pig semen you’ll need:

  • a license from the Department of the Environment
  • an export health certificate
  • to make sure the semen comes from an approved collection centre

The licence carries terms and conditions which you must strictly follow to protect the existing livestock population from diseases which semen could import.

These conditions include:

  • the department must be given 24 hours notification of the arrival of the semen
  • the semen must be accompanied, upon importation, by a completed DEFRA health certificate, signed by an official veterinarian
  • a copy of the export health certificate should be forwarded to the Department of the Environment within 48 hours of importation
  • semen imported in the consignment must only be utilised for animals possessed by the importer to whom the licence is issued
  • unused semen from this consignment must be destroyed or disposed of by a method approved by the States Veterinary Officer

Licence to import pig semen application form

Notification form for the movement into jersey of germplasm

The approved collection centre will contact the local animal health office in the UK to obtain the export health certificate and issue relevant guidance. 

As the importer you’ll need to find a pig semen approved collection centres on Defra.

Artificial insemination (AI) 

See guidance and regulations on artificial insemination (AI).

Sheep and goats

Diseases and infections

There is a number of notifiable animal diseases or infections your sheep and goats may catch. In Jersey, the most common are bluetongue and foot and mouth.

List of notifiable animal diseases

You must notify us if you suspect that your animal to have a notifiable disease.

If your animal is unwell but you do not suspect a notifiable disease, you should contact your private veterinary surgeon.

Declaration of special measures

The Minister for the Environment has reasonable grounds to suspect the existence of sheep and goat pox in:

  • Spain 
  • Bulgaria

This disease is not transmissible to humans but has an animal health and economic importance.

The special measures apply from 9 October 2023 and will continue to apply until further notice.

Imports are suspended for the following ovine and caprine commodities from Spain and Bulgaria:

  • live animals
  • germplasm
  • fresh or chilled hides and skins

The restrictions on live animals and germplasm will be implemented through amendments to the third country lists which has been completed by DEFRA. These restrictions will cover imports to Jersey as information in third country lists are necessary to certify health certificates. Find the third country lists on EU and EFTA countries approved to export animals and animal products to Great Britain on data.gov.uk.

The restrictions on fresh or chilled hides and skins need to be established through special measures.

Declaration of special measures for sheep and goat pox

Find further information on the special measures in the UK on sheep pox and goat pox in Bulgaria on GOV.UK and sheep and goat pox in Spain on GOV.UK.

Keeper's registration

If you keep sheep or goats you must register as a keeper. This include if you keep these animals as pets or intended for the abattoir.

Your application to register will be processed by the Jersey Cattle Movement Service (JCMS). They will:

  • issue your holding numbers
  • issue your registers
  • obtain your ear tags

A fee may be charged by the JCMS for your registration.

We will hold a copy of all your d​ata details at the department.

Application form to register as a sheep or goats keeper

Introductory letter for sheep or goats keepers

Records keeping​​

Record keeping is important because if a notifiable disease is confirmed we'll need to know:

  • how many animals you have
  • ear tag numbers
  • any movements

As a sheep and goats' keeper you must record in a register approved by the Minister within 36 hours of the event of:

  • births
  • deaths
  • movements on and off your holding
  • ear tagging events
  • the total number of livestock on your holding at any time

You can keep a paper or electronic version with a backup. In the sheet template below we have prepared 2 pages. The first is an example to help you complete the second page which is a template.

It’s important you record your running total so if we ask you how many animals you have, you can tell us immediately.

A keeper must keep an entry in the register for 6 years after the entry is made and make it available to an inspector on demand.

Sheep's record sheet template

Goats' record sheet template

Identification of animals

Your sheep and goats should be identified with ear tags. The JCMS can order ear tags for you if needed. This will be at an additional cost.

All sheep and goats must be correctly identified before you move them off your holding.

Ear tags 

All animals have to be double ear tagged before they're 6 months old or in any case before they are moved off the holding. This excludes sheep and goats raised on the holding of birth and go directly to the abattoir before they reach 1 year of age.

You should order ear tags as needed from Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society (RJA&HS).

The ear tags show the letters UK followed by:

  • a 5 digit number unique to your holding premises
  • a 2 digit species identifier sheep 01, goats 02
  • an individual number made of 5 digits

The ear tags for each species of animal is different in size and shape and possibly colour, but they will not be red.

Sheep and goats under 12 months of age consigned to the abattoir must have at least 1 ear tag which has the Jersey area code UK03 and the holding number

Imports of animals

Imports suspended

You can import sheep and goats into Jersey from:

  • the UK
  • Isle of Man
  • Guernsey

You must have a licence issued by the Department of the Environment and an Export Health Certificate.

Imports are subject to a strict set of criteria designed to stop certain animal diseases from entering the Island. The process can take several months to complete.

To import sheep or goats:

  1. you must contact the States Veterinary Officer (SVO) to arrange an inspection to certify the isolation premises of destination
  2. if the isolation premises are acceptable, the SVO will issue you with a Quarantine Premises Approval Certificate
  3. the certificate should be sent to the exporter
  4. an Official Veterinarian (OV) in the place of export must inspect the animals and carry out any required tests
  5. the exporter must apply to the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) UK, for an Export of Sheep and Goats for Breeding to Channel Islands Health Certificate (7783EHC). They must enclose the completed Quarantine Premises Approval Certificate
  6. exporters must comply with the UK welfare laws relating to the export of animals. Welfare conditions during transport are laid down by Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005. The transporter should contact their own authorities to find out the requirements
  7. the owner or exporter must notify the Department of the Environment at least 24 hours before the arrival of the shipment by completing the imports notification form. They’ll need the expected date and time of arrival in Jersey and the vessel and vehicle registration number transporting the animals
  8. the Health Certificate and schedule (7783EHC) must be completed and signed by an Official Veterinarian appointed by APHA. These documents must give details of the individual ear numbers, breed, sex and age of the animals and the registration number of the vehicle in which the animals are being transported to Jersey
  9. the original Health Certificate, Quarantine Premises Approval Certificate and the Import Licence must accompany the animals and be available for inspection upon request
  10. the owner or importer must confirm to the SVO the animals arrival at the approved premises of destination. The SVO will arrange a time to inspect the animals on the approved premises

Conditions to import sheep and goats

Application for an official import licence for sheep and goats

You should get a copy of a specimen health certificate (7783EHC) and guidance (7783NFG) by contacting the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA):

When the animals arrive in Jersey

The animals will have to go into isolation on arrival and be tested for a number of diseases.

You must make sure:

  • you have a prepared field approved by the SVO  in which the sheep or goats can be isolated for a period between 1 and 6 months
  • have suitable handling facilities so that sheep can be hands on examined and assistance available for disease testing

Isolation premises for animal imports

Moving the animals out of the isolation premises

You cannot move the animals from the isolation premises until the required tests have been done and satisfactory results received. The SVO will confirm the release from isolation in writing.

If you moved the sheep or goats before the end of the isolation period the SVO must approve the new premises before the animals can be moved.

Semen regulations

Imports suspended

Importing semen for artificial insemination (AI) is an alternative to importing live sheep or goats.

If you want to import sheep or goat semen you must:

  • have a licence from the Department of the Environment
  • have an export health certificate
  • make sure the semen comes from an approved collection centre

The licence to import carries terms and conditions which must be strictly adhered to in order to protect the existing livestock population from diseases which semen could import. These conditions include:

  • the department must be given 24 hours notification of the arrival of the semen
  • the semen must be accompanied, upon importation, by a completed DEFRA health certificate, signed by an official veterinarian
  • a copy of the export health certificate should be forwarded to the Department of the Environment within 48 hours of importation
  • semen imported in the consignment must only be utilised for animals possessed by the importer to whom the licence is issued
  • unused semen from this consignment must be destroyed or disposed of by a method approved by the States veterinary officer

Application to import sheep and goat semen

Notification form for the movement into jersey of germplasm

The approved collection centre will contact the local animal health office in the UK to get the export health certificate and issue relevant guidance.

As the importer you'll need to find a sheep and goat semen approved collection centres on Defra.

Artificial insemination (AI)

See guidance and regulations on artificial insemination (AI).

Imports notification form

You must complete and send us the notification form below a least 1 working day before the animal is due to arrive in Jersey.

This includes imports of:

  • horses
  • pigs
  • poultry
  • sheep
  • goats
  • bees
  • animal semen (germplasm)

Notification form for the movement of animals into Jersey

Declare your import to customs and pay GST

You may need to pay GST if the total import cost exceeds the personal allowance. This includes the cost of:

  • the animal or animal semen (germplasm)
  • freight
  • insurances

If your animal is free you need to get it valued for customs purposes. If your animal does not have a specific breed you should research the value a similar breed is usually sold for. For more information email immigration@gov.je or call +44 (0) 1534 448000.

Importing unaccompanied personal goods and paying customs duties

Isolation premises for animal imports

Isolation premises must be used for imports of:

  • pigs
  • sheep
  • goats

Isolation periods depend on the type of animal and vary between 1 to 6 months. Check the section on the animal you're importing for more details.

Your isolation premises must be approved by the States Veterinary Officer (SVO) before your import takes place. The premises and field you use to isolate your animals must be:

  • of an adequate size and design for the type and number of animals being imported
  • meet the requirements of the relevant animal welfare code 
  • located at a sufficient distance away from other farm animals
  • where possible, located away from roads, tracks, footpaths and bridle ways
  • capable of having access restricted to essential people only
  • constructed or fenced so animals cannot escape or stray

Biosecurity measures

There must be strict biosecurity measures in place at the entrance of your premises and field. So that everything used in the management of the sheep and goats can be thoroughly disinfected, including:

  • all clothing
  • vehicles
  • equipment used

We recommend that you keep a separate set of clothing and equipment at the isolation premises. Especially if you're in contact with other farm animals.

If possible, sufficient supplies of feedstuffs should be placed at the isolation premises to cover the needs of the animals for the entire isolation period.

Coming out of the isolation premises

Once the isolation period is done, you cannot move your animals from the isolation premises until:

  • the required tests are done
  • satisfactory results are received
  • the SVO confirms the release from isolation in writing

If you need to move your animals before the end of their isolation period, the SVO must approve the new premises before you can move your animals.

Veterinary medicines records

Records keeping

You must keep veterinary medicines records if you have livestock of:

  • cattle
  • sheep
  • goats
  • pigs
  • poultry
  • bees
  • fish
  • shellfish

You must record any treatments and make the records available to an inspector when asked.

The veterinary medicines record must contain information on the:

  • identity of the animal(s) treated
  • drug's name and quantity given
  • date and method of administration
  • withdrawal period observed, within the meaning of that expression in the Monitoring Directive

Vet medicine books for the species you keep can be ordered on record keeping requirements for veterinary medicines on GOV.UK. You can also use our medicines records template.

Medicines records template

Residue surveillance

Under the EU Legislation (Monitoring of Residues in Animals) (Jersey) Regulations 2019 the Minister is required to analyse samples from food producing animals for residues of veterinary medicines and prohibited substances such as:

  • authorised veterinary medicines
  • prohibited substances
  • various contaminants

This requires an annual surveillance plan to cover:

  • red meat (bovine)
  • milk (bovine)
  • honey

The annual plan for samples testing runs from January to December. Sample analysis is carried out by Fera Science Ltd.

The substances to be tested are set out for each species in the Annexes I and II of Council Directive 96/23/EC.

Non-compliant samples

If we find a sample containing an unacceptable residue, we carry out an investigation at the farm of origin to establish the cause.

For minor breaches, we give advice to the farmer to avoid this from happening again and to their vet, if appropriate.

If there are concerns about the residues status of the animals we may take more or impose movement restrictions on the animals.

In serious cases, the Minister can take further action which could lead to disposal of stock and prosecution.

Produce from the same farmer will be targeted again for sampling.

Artificial insemination (AI)

You must be a registered vet in Jersey or have an open licence granted by the department to carry out artificial insemination (AI) on:

  • cattle
  • pigs
  • sheep and goats

To be granted an open licence, you must complete the application form and provide evidence that you have successfully completed AI training under the direction of a vet.

Application form for an open licence to carry out artificial insemination


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