Skip to main content Skip to accessibility
This website is not compatible with your web browser. You should install a newer browser. If you live in Jersey and need help upgrading call the States of Jersey web team on 440099.
Government of Jerseygov.je

Information and public services for the Island of Jersey

L'înformâtion et les sèrvices publyis pouor I'Île dé Jèrri

  • Choose the service you want to log in to:

  • gov.je

    Update your notification preferences

  • one.gov.je

    Access government services

  • CAESAR

    Clear goods through customs or claim relief

  • Talentlink

    View or update your States of Jersey job application

Trading with the EU

Importing and Exporting Goods

On 1 January 2021 the transition period with the European Union (EU) will end, and Jersey will operate a full, external border as determined by our obligations under the United Kingdom (UK)-Crown Dependencies (CD) Customs Arrangement. This means that controls will be placed on the movement of goods between Jersey and the EU.  

Recognising the impact of coronavirus on businesses’ ability to prepare, and following the announcement in February that the UK Government will implement full border controls on imports coming into the UK-CD customs union from the EU, the Government of Jersey has taken the decision to introduce the new border controls in 3 stages up until 1 July 2021. This flexible and pragmatic approach gives extra time to make necessary arrangements. 

Further detail on Jersey’s Border Operating Model can be found below.

The 3 stages to introduce the new border controls

1. From January 2021

Traders importing standard goods, covering everything from clothes to electronics, will need to prepare for basic customs requirements. Tariffs will be payable where due on relevant goods. Safety and Security declarations will not be required on imports for the first six months. Standard customs declarations will be needed from this date for controlled goods and excise goods like alcohol and tobacco products.

There will be physical checks at the point of destination or other approved premises on some live animals and plants, and a requirement to pre-notify for all relevant imports, but they will not be required to enter the UK-CD customs union via a Border Control Post (BCP). They will be required to have certification which will be checked before release.

Export declarations and exit Safety and Security declarations will be required for all goods.

Traders importing and exporting goods using the Common Transit Convention (CTC) will need to follow all of the transit procedures - these will not be introduced in stages.

2. From April 2021

All products of animal origin (POAO), for example meat, honey, milk or egg products, and all regulated plants and plant products will require pre-notification and the relevant health documentation. Any physical checks will continue to be conducted at the point of destination until July 2021

3. From July 2021

Traders moving any goods will have to make full customs declarations at the point of importation and pay relevant tariffs. Full Safety and Security declarations will be required, while for commodities subject to sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) controls, these will have to be presented to BCPs and there will be an increase in physical checks and the taking of samples. SPS checks for animals, plants and their products will take place at the Jersey BCP and not at destination

Further guidance providing practical detail will be published in the coming weeks.

Jersey’s Border Operating Model

The United Kingdom (UK) recently published its Border Operating Model. This outlines how it will introduce phased customs controls over three stages between 1 January 2021 and 1 July 2021, as summarised in the section above, in relation to trade with the EU. The below document seeks to explain how Jersey will simultaneously implement the same controls.

Jersey Border Operating Model

Customs 'Safety and Security'

On 1st January 2021 the transition period with the European Union (EU) will end and Jersey will operate a full, external border as determined by our obligations under the United Kingdom (UK)-Crown Dependencies (CD) Customs Arrangement. This means that controls will be placed on the movement of goods between Jersey and the EU.

From January 2021 Export declarations will need to be submitted on CAESAR for all goods exported directly to the EU, these declarations will be used for Safety and Security risk screening.  For the purposes of Safety and Security in the EU, an ‘Entry Summary Declaration’ (ENS) will also need to be submitted on the EU Import Control System (ICS).

From January 2021 an ‘Exit Summary declaration’ (EXS) will need to be submitted on the EU Export Control System (ECS) for all goods exported from the EU to Jersey.  From 01 July 2021 an ENS will need to be submitted on the UK ICS for all goods imported from the EU to Jersey.

Export declarations on CAESAR will change the way in which shippers submit export manifests and may require software changes to their systems.  In order to submit ENS and EXS declarations on the EU ICS and ECS, shippers will need to obtain an ‘Economic Operators Registration and Identification number’ (EORI) from the customs authorities of the EU country responsible for the place where they first lodge a declaration or apply for a decision.  In order to submit an ENS on the UK ICS shippers will need to obtain an EORI from HMRC.

Business Safety and Security guide

Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI numbers)

An EORI (Economic Operator Registration and Identification) number is currently required by businesses and people undertaking certain customs functions across the EU. An EORI number issued in a member state is currently valid across the entire EU. After the transition period the UK will operate a UK EORI scheme separate to the EU’s. A UK EORI will have 12 digits prefaced with the letters “GB” and will only be valid for declarations made in the UK. The document below provides general guidance in relation to EORI numbers while stressing that if in doubt the best option is to apply for one.

Economic Operator Registration and Identification

Trader guidance

Where goods are exported directly from Jersey to a place outside the Customs Union, an export declaration will need to be submitted by the exporter or a clearance agent on the Customs declaration and payment website. The below guidance notes will assist with this process.

Trader Export Declaration guide to Third Country

Where goods are imported from a place outside the Customs Union by a GST registered trader or Approved General Importer, a declaration will need to be submitted by the trader by logging into their account on the Customs declaration and payment website. The below guidance notes will assist with the declaration process.

Trader GST registered or AGI import declaration guide from Third Country

Where goods are exported directly from Jersey to a place outside the Customs Union, an export declaration will need to be submitted by the exporter or a clearance agent on the Customs declaration and payment website ahead of the corresponding export manifest. It will be necessary for the shipper or haulier to create an export manifest to attach the export declarations. The below guidance notes will assist with this process.

Shipper or Handling Agent Export Manifest guide to Third Country

Back to top
rating button