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Advice for businesses during Level 3

About Level 3 of the Safe Exit Framework

On 1 May, the Government published Jersey's Safe Exit Framework. It specifies the public health and social measures to be taken at each of four levels as we seek to progress through the COVID-19 pandemic as safely as possible.

On 11 May, Jersey moved to Level 3 of the Framework. The Safe Exit: Level 3 Policy is a statement of the measures to be taken in Level 3.

The Safe Exit: Level 3 Policy

Summary of the main changes from Level 4 to Level 3

Work and business

From 11 May, you continue to be advised to Stay at Home when you can.

People should continue to work from home wherever possible.

People engaged in essential and non-essential work as set out in this policy are also permitted to be outside the home for the purposes of that work. Physical distancing and good hygiene should be practised at all times.

Where a business or organisation is permitted to open in Level 3, you are asked to maintain the minimum viable staffing level needed on your premises, to mitigate spread.

As limited business activity resumes, in careful stages, employers are also strongly encouraged to be flexible in recognition of the risks and constraints the pandemic is imposing on workers and their families:

  • consider if any of your staff are vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, or live with someone who is severely vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, and how you can help them to return to work with additional mitigation in place where needed and possible. An individual whose age or condition makes them vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, and who wishes to return to work, is encouraged to seek medical advice from their GP if there is uncertainty as to how to return to work safely
  • if a member of staff has a condition that puts them in the ‘severely vulnerable’ risk category, they should not return to work
  • try to enable staff who care for children to stay at home while schools and nurseries are closed.

Essential emergency home and building repair and maintenance works may be carried out by plumbers, electricians, roofers, scaffolders and other tradespeople. This work can be done inside people’s homes where it is urgent or essential, provided that the tradesperson is well and has no symptoms. It is vital that public health guidelines, including maintaining a 2 metre distance from any household occupants, are followed to ensure everyone’s safety.

No work should be carried out in any household which is isolating or where an individual is severely vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, unless it is to remedy a direct risk to the safety of the household, such as emergency plumbing or repairs, and where the tradesperson is willing to do so. The isolated person should occupy a different room whilst the work is being carried out, if at all possible.

Essential work

Essential work is designated as:

  • Health and care services – covering emergency/necessary medical and dental work; pharmacies; opticians, audiologists; residential and nursing homes; mental health care; management of the deceased
  • Paid and voluntary work to care for vulnerable and elderly people in their homes, for example home care providers, caretakers, the Community Taskforce and Parish volunteers
  • Transportation, production and retail of food, beverages, household supplies, fuel, medicines and medical supplies
  • Transportation and retail of construction supplies; hardware products necessary for home and business maintenance, sanitation; farm equipment and supplies, pet and livestock feed; gardening tools and supplies
  • Transportation and retail of non-medical cloth face masks, and fabric and sewing supplies for the purpose of making them
  • Maintenance of Jersey's ports, air and sea links  
  • Public transport and regulated taxis
  • Food delivery and takeaway services
  • Public sector staff and contractors, including Parish staff, who form part of the formal emergency response structure
  • Public protection, emergency services and justice system (police, Honorary Police, ambulance, fire, coastguard, lifeboats, customs and immigration; courts, law officers, Viscount, probation, prison)
  • Private security services
  • Social work, and residential childcare work
  • Teaching, school support, and youth work where engaged in schools, as well as nursery and child-minding provision, for critical workers (at minimum levels)
  • Maintenance of critical Island infrastructure, utilities, postal and telecommunications networks, Met Office
  • Waste management and recycling services
  • Postal and parcel delivery services
  • Cleaning services for working environments, where that can be undertaken while adhering to physical distancing guidelines
  • Essential emergency home and building repair and maintenance services
  • Essential vehicle, boat and bicycle repair and maintenance services
  • Fishing, farming and farm work, while adhering to physical distancing guidelines
  • Care of livestock and animals in captivity, necessary veterinary and pest control work
  • Critical branch-based banking services to enable cash and other financial transactions, maintenance of ATMs, call referral systems, credit application systems and payment systems
  • General financial services – critical firm management and maintenance of core on-site services such as IT systems, banking and mail collection and delivery
  • Advocates essential to ongoing court matters, limited staff critical to legal firms' management and maintenance of core on-site services such as IT systems, banking and mail collection and delivery
  • Removals and relocation services, where supporting home moves 
  • Essential government regulatory roles, including those related to financial stability and banking supervision
  • Public service broadcasters and other mainstream news media
  • Ministers, States Members, and staff enabling the functioning of the democratic system

Workers engaged directly in these categories are considered essential as are ancillary staff providing essential support to essential work. For example, taxi dispatchers for taxi services and school administration staff are considered essential.

Volunteering

Essential workers and critical workers (a smaller group of essential workers in especially critical roles) should not volunteer or undertake secondary roles, so that essential services can be maintained. It is important both that essential workers remain healthy themselves and that they do not inadvertently bring COVID-19 into essential workplaces.

Health and care workers need to be especially conscious of the importance of shielding the vulnerable and containing the spread of the virus by limiting contact with others. Health workers are at increased risk of catching COVID-19 and must therefore not work as volunteers. If you are currently undertaking voluntary work that involves vulnerable people, please make alternative arrangements for the work that you need to give up.

There are many people across Jersey not engaged in essential work who we encourage instead to take up the call to volunteer to support those in need in our communities during this outbreak.

Non-essential work

As in Level 4, some non-essential work can continue to operate where it does not pose a risk to public health

Non-essential businesses and premises permitted to open in Level 3

During Level 3, some categories of non-essential business and premises are permitted to open, within the general principles set out under 'work and business' above.

From 11 May 2020, the following non-essential businesses and organisations are permitted to open within published guidelines:

  • outdoor recreational sites, facilities and services
  • cafés and restaurants, for the purpose of offering safe outdoor seated food service
  • large shops (with a retail sales area of at least 700 square metres)

Property viewings are also permitted from this date within guidelines.

From 18 May 2020, the following non-essential business are also premitted to open within published guidelines:

  • all retail premises (i.e. those with a retail sales area of under 700 square metres) including outdoor and indoor markets and auction houses and retail premises associate with estate agents 

Detailed guidelines are provided to enable these businesses and organisations to mitigate the risk of spreading COVID-19 as they open and operate.

Other non-essential businesses and premises

Businesses and organisations engaged in any other non-essential work and which are not a type of establishment that must remain closed, may have a maximum of 2 people in an indoor business premises, as long as those individuals are able to respect strict physical distancing and hygiene measures at all times.

Where a non-essential business operates outdoors or away from its own premises (e.g., gardening, external decorating, window cleaning, pool cleaning), you can continue to provide services as long as no more than you plus 5 others (6 in total) are gathered at one time. You should also enforce strict physical distancing at all times – travelling to and from the place of work, and at all times during the course of the work.

Business activity that falls within the remit of the construction scheme must comply with the conditions of that scheme. The construction scheme is anticipated to continue throughout each level of the safe exit framework.

Businesses and premises that must remain closed

The Safe Exit Level 3 Policy lists some businesses that must close their premises. Details on which business premises must remain closed and exceptions that can open are given in the sector advice below.

Where the Government has advised business and premises to close, they are not allowed to open as normal. As an employee you should talk to your employer and, if possible, work as directed by your employer in accordance with the Safe Exit Level 3 Policy.

Safe Exit advice for all businesses

Guiding principles

The approach to opening businesses follows the guiding principles of the overarching Safe Exit Framework published Friday 1 May. These include:

  • where an activity can happen, or a business can open in a way that minimises the risk of spreading COVID-19, it should be able to do so as soon as possible
  • changes must be easy to understand and relatively easy to implement, with guidelines provided
  • wherever possible the levels should introduce changes that are fair. Some unequal experiences are however inevitable
  • the likelihood of transmitting COVID-19 is much lower outside and increases when you spend longer periods of time in proximity to others, especially inside. Indoor spaces particularly should therefore be opened up in stages
  • it is sensible to avoid unnecessary risks – for example, wherever working from home is possible, people should keep doing it
  • physical distancing and good hygiene are fundamental and should be maintained through every level; behavioural prompts to follow simple public health advice (cloth masks, hand sanitisers, posters) should be encouraged throughout

This guidance supports all businesses that are now permitted to open in identifying how they can adapt their practices to significantly increase safety for staff and customers in the face of COVID-19 and to reduce the risk as they open and operate. 

The guidance is split into two sections. Firstly, the core guidance which all businesses that are now operating should adhere to and secondly specific guidance for particular business activities.

Put a plan in place

Every business or organisation opening during the COVID-19 pandemic should plan in advance how they are going to reduce the risk of spreading the virus during the course of operating.

Businesses have two critical areas to consider:

  • protection of staff and their families
  • protection of customers and their families 

It is important to engage your staff in how to reduce the risk. Their involvement and commitment will be key to reducing risk for everyone. Before a business opens, staff will need to understand how to minimise the risk of the spread of COVID-19 and be provided with training where appropriate. Wherever possible, organisations should have a written plan, and share it with staff.

This plan should consider the core guidance that applies to all businesses as well as the industry specific advice which will be relevant to your particular business operations.

This plan should be made available to the Government, the Police and the relevant industry regulator on request.

Businesses are reminded that all existing legislation and regulations that apply to their operations remain in place.  This includes, for example, Health and Safety at Work, planning and building control, environmental health etc.

Protect staff and their families

Support staff to follow core public health advice

All employers should encourage and support staff to follow the advice on protecting yourself and others against COVID-19. This includes:

  • keep 2 metres apart from anyone outside your immediate household
  • wash your hands for 20 seconds regularly throughout the day
  • catch your cough or sneeze in a tissue, bin it and wash your hands. If you don’t have a tissue, cough into your elbow and avoid touching your face
  • clean and disinfect objects and surfaces, especially in toilet areas
  • cloth masks are advised, especially in enclosed public spaces such as shops (for staff and customers) 
  • if you have flu-like symptoms, stay or go home immediately and call the Helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566

All staff should be encouraged and enabled to follow this core advice rigorously.

Posters on COVID-19 to print and display

Symptoms

If staff report feeling unwell with symptoms of COVID-19 they must not be permitted to work, and if possible should not travel to their place of work. 

They should follow isolation guidance and phone the Coronavirus Help Line on +44 (0) 1534 445566. They may be entitled to COVID-19 specific sickness benefit

You should establish procedures as to what to do if a member of staff or a customer becomes unwell on the premises to ensure isolation from others as soon as possible. This should include a log of the date and time of the occurrence, should contact tracing become necessary.

Hand washing

Staff should be encouraged and supported to wash their hands as guided in the following circumstances:

  • on arrival at work
  • after touching hand contact surfaces such as handrails, door handles, light switches
  • after using the toilet or going into the toilet areas
  • after touching their face, sneezing or coughing
  • after smoking
  • after handling and opening packaging, money, receipts, and cleaning supplies
  • after removing gloves and before putting on new ones
  • after touching rubbish

Staffing levels

Where a business or organisation is permitted to open in Level 3, you are asked to maintain the minimum viable staffing level needed on your premises, to reduce the spread of COVID-19. 

As limited business activity resumes, in careful stages, employers are also strongly encouraged to be flexible in recognition of the risks and constraints the pandemic is imposing on workers and their families. Employers are encouraged to consider if any staff are vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, or live with someone who is severely vulnerable, or if they have child care obligations while the schools and nurseries are closed.

Staff vulnerable to COVID-19 or with a household member who is vulnerable

Employers should refer to Shielding for Vulnerable People for a list of those conditions within the severely vulnerable and vulnerable categories. 

Severely vulnerable

Those people who are in the ‘severely vulnerable’ group because of their much higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 (those with serious underlying medical conditions) are strongly encouraged to continue to shield themselves at home.

Vulnerable

People vulnerable, but not ‘severely vulnerable’ to serious complications of COVID-19 (those with less severe medical conditions) are advised to follow general public health measures but to be especially careful to do so, especially when outside the home.

Employers are encouraged to be flexible where possible, and to enable staff vulnerable to COVID-19 to return to work with additional mitigation in place where needed and possible. If you have a condition that makes you vulnerable to COVID-19 and there is uncertainty as to how you can return to work safely then seek medical advice.

Household member is severely vulnerable or vulnerable

People that are living with someone who is vulnerable or severely vulnerable do not need to adopt the protective shielding measures themselves. They should do what they can to support the person shielding and they should stringently follow guidance on physical distancing, reducing their contact outside the home.  

They should refer to the guidance on Shielding for Vulnerable People for further information on how they can do this.

Childcare provision

Schools and nurseries have been closed since 23 March. 

Employers are therefore encouraged to be flexible and where possible allow parents to stay at home to care for their children while schools and nurseries are closed. 

Guidance for parents and young people on nursery, school and college closures and who childcare provision is currently provided

Economic support

There is economic support available for both businesses and workers.

Government support for businesses

Coronavirus Financial Support brief information and guidance for employees

Protect customers and their families

Enable everyone to follow public health advice

You should consider what measures you can take to help everyone on your premises or engaging with your business to follow public health advice. This should include staff, customers and any other permitted visitors.

It is important to make it easy for people to comply. 

Measures that are encouraged include:

  • prominent provision of hand sanitiser, for example at entry points to premises and accompanied by messages encouraging use of the sanitiser. Those with skin conditions that mean they cannot use sanitiser should have their own single use disposable gloves and wear these
  • encourage staff and customers to wear cloth masks when in indoor spaces (e.g shops) 
  • display information posters on physical distancing, hand washing and the symptoms of COVID-19

Physical distancing

You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing of 2 metres between everyone on your premises including staff, customers and any other permitted visitors wherever possible. 

Measures to do this will depend on your business operations but might include:

  • limiting the numbers of staff or customers allowed on the premises or part of the premises at any one time
  • introducing a by appointment or reservation only service 
  • taking orders and payment over the phone for pick up or delivery only to reduce the time spent on the premises
  • marking out walk-ways to control the flow of pedestrian movement
  • prepare to minimise and control customers queuing for services or using toilet facilities if open
  • reducing the number of tables and spacing them out
  • changing working patterns (e.g. staff restocking shelves when the shop is closed to customers)
  • signage and posters can be put in place to support physical distancing
  • think about how to maintain physical distancing when deliveries are made to your premises. Schedule deliveries to avoid crowding in delivery areas and consider non-contact stock deliveries
  • consider how staff security checks can be managed while maintaining physical distancing if these are carried out
  • staff who go outside the store for a break should maintain physical distancing while doing so

Suggested wording for signs

Physical distancing. To protect our customers and staff at this time, we are actively managing the number of customers who can come into our premises at any one time. Please make sure you stand two metres apart using the marked lines on the floor. When at the front wait behind the line until you’re called forward. Thank you for your cooperation.

Sanitising hands

Customers should be encouraged to sanitise their hands upon arrival at a business premises. 

Hand sanitiser should be placed at entrances with a sign asking customers to use it before entering.

Suggested wording for signs

For the safety of everyone, please use this hand sanitiser before entering – do not enter if you are ill.

Contactless payment

Businesses are asked to strongly encourage customers to pre-pay over the phone or pay using contactless payment methods wherever possible. It may be necessary to split the bill into multiple payments to facilitate this. 

If another form of payment is required, provide enough disposable gloves for staff to be able to change them regularly, and staff should be advised to wash their hands before putting on a new pair.

Deliveries

When making deliveries:

  • maintain a physical distance of 2 metres between workers, and between workers and customers wherever possible
  • explain to customers how the delivery will work by phone or email in advance 
  • only one person in a delivery vehicle wherever possible
  • take payment in advance of delivery wherever possible
  • if a handheld device is used do not hand it to a customer; instead ask the customer to stand back, place it on a convenient spot before stepping away, allow the customer to complete the transaction; the customer should then step back to allow collection of the handheld device. The device should be cleaned before and after each transaction
  • avoid cash where possible
  • where a delivery won’t fit through a letterbox, place it at the customer’s door, or in an outdoor location. Knock on the door, and step aside to a safe distance while the customer retrieves their item or confirms delivery
  • where proof of receipt is required, consider enabling the delivery worker to log the name of the person accepting the item on their behalf  
  • the purchase and delivery of larger items that require more than one person to deliver them should be avoided unless absolutely necessary. In an emergency, customers will need essential household goods such as cookers and washing machines to be delivered inside the property. Agree an advance plan with the customer.  If more than one worker is needed to complete the delivery, they must physically distance during travel even if that means they need to travel in separate vehicles 
  • where possible, the customer should take receipt of the delivery outside and transport the item into their home themselves. If delivery workers needs to enter a house to deliver an item they should use the external door nearest to the final indoor location. Householders should stay at least 2 metres away, or ideally in another room. The delivery workers must leave promptly
  • delivery workers should not enter a household where anyone is isolating for confirmed or suspected COVID-19 or is shielding. Ensure delivery workers know they can abort a delivery and reschedule if they believe that entering a home could be a risk to them or the customer
  • if delivery workers needs to enter a house to deliver an item they should follow the businesses entering people’s homes for the purposes of obtaining information required for a quote or to complete deliveries
  • all workers must be able to wash their hands with alcohol-based hand sanitiser before and after each delivery. They should also aim to wash their hands with soap and water periodically during the day

Cleaning premises and equipment

To prevent the risk of viral spread on surfaces, it is essential that normal cleaning regimes are enhanced, and the frequency increased. 

General cleaning 

There should be particular emphasis on surfaces that are regularly touched by staff and customers, for example:

  • door handles
  • switches
  • stairway railings if present and lift buttons
  • store rooms
  • tills
  • trolleys and baskets – especial attention being given to touch points
  • shelving units
  • checkout counters

Normal cleaning products should be sufficient to kill COVID-19. 

Disposable cloths should be disposed of as appropriate or if using reusable these should be regularly washed at a high temperature.

Cleaning of toilet facilities

Toilet hygiene is extremely important to prevent spread of COVID-19.

Designate at least one toilet as available only for staff use to minimise the risk of cross contamination.

COVID-19 handwashing guidance posters should be clearly displayed in all toilet environments. 

All toilet facilities provided by businesses for customers should be cleaned as guided twice a day and at any time required following 1 hourly checks. 

Hand dryers should be disconnected, these spread water droplets and not everyone may have effectively washed their hands. Instead we recommend paper towels are provided. 

COVID-19 toilet cleaning guidelines:

  • when cleaning toilet facilities, wear household rubber gloves that are reserved for this purpose and a disposable plastic apron 
  • disinfect by wiping down the toilet door handle, wash hand basin taps and toilet flush handle with a disposable cloth dampened with 0.1% bleach solution
  • make sure all areas touched by hands are cleaned as these are the areas most likely to be contaminated
  • clean the toilet bowl using a toilet brush and 0.1% bleach solution and rinse the brush by flushing the toilet
  • always flush the toilet with the seat and lid down to prevent splashing
  • use disposable cloths or paper roll and disposable mop heads, to clean all hard surfaces, floors, chairs, door handles and sanitary fittings
  • avoid creating splashes when cleaning
  • any cloths and mop heads used within the toilet area must be disposed of securely tied in waste bags and placed in a covered bin 

Managing waste

All waste should be stored securely and disposed of through your normal waste collections.

Preparing to re-open

Before re-opening, businesses should consider the following:

  • stagger shift starts, end and break times to avoid crowding among staff
  • arrange shifts to maintain same staff working together where possible 
  • conduct a risk assessment covering the considerations detailed in this guidance and your business specific guidance
  • consider whether temporary policy changes around factors such as staff to staff contact, staff to customer contact, and contractor interaction are needed
  • list all areas of the business, from the warehouse to staff toilets, lifts, stair wells, locker rooms and stock rooms and how physical distancing and hygiene measures will be applied in all of them
  • identify all mitigation measures that are required to enable you to meet the conditions of re-opening
  • confirm how and when these mitigation measures will be implemented and who is responsible for overseeing them
  • if more cleaning is needed consider whether existing contractors can carry this out 
  • ensure that your sickness notification process and COVID-19 specific process has been made clear to all staff. Symptoms must be reported, decisions recorded and dated along with reference to government advice 
  • consider how to keep staff up to date on all relevant government guidelines or store policy changes
  • ensure signage and relevant communications needed for customers is in place 
  • consider how frequently you will review your mitigation measures
Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

Food and drink sector

Must remain closedExceptions
  • restaurants
  • public houses
  • wine bars and other drinking establishments
  • other food and drink establishments including within hotels and members' clubs

Provision of physically-distanced outdoor seated food service only, within published guidelines; reservation-only service strongly encouraged.  Alcoholic beverages may be sold with meals, but an alcoholic drinks-only service is not permitted. Strict physical distancing and hygiene measures required for staff (inside and outside) as well as customers (outside only). Venues to close by 10pm.

Food delivery and takeaway (including beach kiosks) should remain operational and can be a new activity. This covers the provision of hot or cold food that has been prepared for consumers for collection or delivery to be consumed, reheated or cooked by consumers off the premises. Delivery is preferred, wherever possible.

Cafés and canteens

Food services at the hospital, care homes or schools, prison and services providing food or drink to the homeless

Measures should be taken to minimise the number of people in a canteen / break space at any one given time, for example by using a rota.

Where possible, staff should be encouraged to bring their own food.

Food safety

All businesses providing food services should follow the guidance on food safety during a changing business model.

Working in kitchens

Physical distancing guidelines should be followed at every stage of food production. This includes supplier delivery, food preparation and service.

Many of our Island's kitchens are small. In times of physical distancing this makes it difficult for usual staffing levels to be maintained. The maximum permitted levels of staffing within the kitchen is that which prevents staff from coming within 2 metres of one another.

You must assess how many members of staff can safely undertake their work, whilst meeting the requirements of physical distancing. This can include separation by area or by time. You must also assess how reduction in staffing may impact on food safety.

Restaurants may consider using areas previously used as customer areas for certain aspects of food preparation.

If you choose to use another kitchen at home or elsewhere you should contact Environmental Health before doing so email Environmental health.

Outdoor seated food service

Under the Safe Exit Level 3 Policy outdoor seated food services are permitted to open. This guidance sets out ways in which businesses providing such services can operate whilst reducing the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

The establishment of an alfresco dining area related, and adjacent, to an existing business selling hot or cold meals and drink for consumption on or off the premises, will be permitted.

Alcoholic beverages may be sold with meals, but an alcoholic drinks-only service is not permitted. 

Note that this guidance is in addition to the general guidance that applies to all businesses opening at the current time.  

All businesses providing food services should also follow the guidance on food safety during a changing business model

Physical distancing

You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing of two metres between everyone on your premises, staff, customers, passers-by and any other permitted visitors. 

This may include:

  • a reservation-only service is strongly encouraged so that a table plan can be arranged and so that the arrival time of customers can be staggered
  • physical distancing of queueing will be required if a large number of individuals arrive at a particular time
  • prepare to minimise and control customers queuing for services or using toilet facilities 
  • set tables to facilitate physical distancing of at least 2 metres between household groups
  • spacing tables and chairs with regard to the potential proximity of passers-by
  • sufficient circulation space for staff and customers to allow adequate physical distancing
  • consider what is the largest household group you can safely accommodate in your premises
  • employing a ‘one-way’ system for staff entering and leaving premises and for customers approaching and leaving the alfresco area or food outlet. This should include clearly marked safe queuing distances

Other measures

  • only allowing members of a single household to occupy a table
  • when a booking is made ask the customer to confirm that they are all from the same household and that none of their group have Covid-19 symptoms
  • customers should not be allowed to stay longer than three hours and service should be finished with the alfresco area cleared and cleaned before 10pm
  • as a rule of thumb, the establishment should avoid anymore than approximately 40 to 50 covers at a time (with physical distancing in place)
  • menus that are shared between different customers are strongly discouraged. Consider using a display board or technology such as smartphone apps and QR codes to enable customers to view menus and to order meals on-line and to make contactless payment
  • prevent customers from sitting at tables until they have been cleared and sanitised

Awnings and weather screens

  • temporary weather screens, awnings and outdoor heaters will be permitted where they are not physically attached to the building or road / pavement surface
  • where a new awning is erected businesses must consider the impact on air flow, to allow at least 50% ventilation to aid air flow around external diners
  • when new awnings are erected the final structure should not be substantially enclosed and it should not constitute more than a roof and one side
  • the alfresco area and any associated screens must not detract from the safe and free flow of traffic and pedestrians

Premises are strongly encouraged to close by 10pm. Government is currently considering the need to regulate to enforce earlier closing times during the pandemic and will do so if required.

Food vans, trailers and carts

The siting of a moveable structure, whether motorised or not, for the sale of hot or cold food and beverages will be permitted. This guidance does not apply to such structures within a domestic curtilage. 

Rope barriers or similar temporary control measures will be allowed to encourage safe and orderly queuing and to allow a safe flow of customers to and from the outlet. 

A number of tables and chairs will be permitted to allow customers to enjoy their food and these should be placed to ensure the required physical distancing from each other. 

The moveable structure and any associated measures must not detract from the safe and free flow of traffic and pedestrians.

The times of operation must be agreed with the Department of Growth, Housing and Environment (Environmental Health) prior to the outlet opening for business. 

Takeaway and food deliveries

Only takeaway services whose kitchen preparation space allows for physical distancing should operate during the Safe Exit Level 3. All businesses providing food services should follow the guidance on Food safety during a changing business model.

Any take away food business that chooses to open must put measures in place to ensure that physical distancing is maintained between their workforce and in any interaction with customers.

Any shop, café, restaurant or bar that ordinarily serves meals or drink will be permitted to serve hot or cold meals and beverages for consumption off the premises.

Service could take place through an existing window or door opening without customers having to enter the premises. 

Rope barriers or similar temporary control measures will be allowed to encourage safe and orderly queuing and to allow a safe flow of customers to and from the outlet. 

Where distanced queuing is not practicable, time distancing can be considered; for example a collection area for beach kiosks where food is placed and the customer name / number called out before the server steps away.

Additional bins could be used for customers to deposit their meal packaging into in order to reduce staff time clearing tables.

Any associated control measures must not detract from the safe and free flow of traffic and pedestrians.

Building alterations

Non-structural internal alterations to a building will be permitted where required to make access to kitchens, toilets and washing facilities easier and safer for staff and / or customers. For example, the placement of partition screens to allow physical distancing and to encourage a one-way flow of people to and from the facilities.

Non-structural external alterations to a building may be permitted where these are of a temporary and reversible nature.

Alterations will not be permitted in or on Listed Buildings without the necessary planning permission and, in all cases, without approval under the relevant Building Bye-Laws. 

Important: Please contact the Planning and Building division of the Department of Growth, Housing and Environment for further information regarding any proposed building alterations, prior to works commencing.

Preparing to re-open

If you have been closed during Stage 4 lockdown or are adapting the services you offer, you will need to get ready for service.

Ensure you have the right permission

  • inform Environmental Health that you intend to reopen and / or begin serving sit down customers
  • complete a Places of Refreshment application if required
  • if you are the owner or manager of a drinks venue and are planning to provide meals, you need to let Environmental Health know, by updating a food registration form, that you will be using your kitchen to prepare meals
  • you may require a Refreshments Licence from the Trading Standards section of Growth, Housing and Environment and, approval from the local Parish for new or expanded facilities on Parish owned land, including pavements. In other areas, consent from the land-owner will be required

Check stocks and equipment

  • you may need to order food with your suppliers early as they will have reduced their levels of fresh produce
  • check all of your stock and discard any out of date food
  • if possible, where equipment was left running (refrigeration / freezers, electronic fly killers) begin checking these are working properly.  Remember to keep records to demonstrate that the units have been working efficiently
  • if equipment was switched off you will need to ensure they are working correctly and refrigerators and freezers are at operating temperature before used for stock storage
  • give yourself and your supplier sufficient time to provide appropriate cleaning materials before reopening. Hand dryers are not recommended during the outbreak, which requires alternative drying facilities. We recommend disposable paper towels

Thoroughly clean the premises

  • give everywhere a deep clean and undertake any repairs and decorating
  • clean and disinfect all equipment and preparation surfaces
  • make sure that your premises are pest free and pest proofed 
  • make sure all doors and windows (internal and external) are closed to help prevent fire and continue to manage pest control
  • inform your waste collector you have restarted trading and ensure that they have access to the external bins
  • ensure your staff are refreshed in food hygiene training. If you’ve been closed, you will need to ensure all staff are refreshed in hygiene and food safety principles
  • staff will need to understand how to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19
Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

Retail sector

Must remain closedExceptions
  • hairdressers
  • barbers
  • beauty and nail salons
  • including piercing and tattoo parlours
  • laser and cosmetic clinics delivering non-essential cosmetic treatments
​None

Guidance to all retailers that are currently permitted to open

Under the Safe Exit Level 3, from 18 May all shops are permitted to open. This guidance sets out ways in which such businesses can operate whilst reducing the risk of the spread of COVID-19.  

Physical barriers and protection from COVID-19 spread

Both staff and customers will be protected by the measures listed in the general guidance for businesses on reducing the risk of COVID-19 spread .

However, staff and customers of the retail sector can be protected from the risk of COVID-19 spread by the following the additional measures:

  • put in place physical barriers such as perspex screens or an equivalent at check-out points
  • provide staff with sufficient supplies of rubber disposable gloves which should be changed every 1-3 hours (depending on the need to physically handle items that customers may have touched such as shared-surfaces and stock)
  • offer staff alternative tasks if concerns are raised
  • remind staff not to share items for example, pens or any other items
  • if disposable gloves, visors or cloth masks are supplied to staff ensure colleagues are reminded to replace or clean them regularly during use, and before and after each use

Physical distancing

You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing of 2 metres between everyone on your premises including staff, customers and any other permitted visitors.

Measures to do this will depend on your business operations but might include:

  • guide customers with floor markings at particular points where they may congregate, such as check-out queues, toilet queues or queues outside the business premises if these are anticipated
  • it will be for individual retailers to decide how they manage and organise space outside of their premises between themselves as required
  • assess how many members of staff can safely undertake their work, whilst maintaining a distance of 2 metres between each other, and consider separation of staff by area or by time
  • assess how a reduction in staffing, if needed, may impact on the ability to open
  • consider allocating a member of staff to supervise entrances to regulate how many customers can enter during busy periods
  • businesses may choose to create one-way systems in shops, shut alternate check outs, or implement other appropriate measures
  • consider suspending services which require direct interaction with customers such as providing make up advice, personal shopping or assistance in carrying large purchases
  • if retailers are continuing to provide these services they should provide suitable protection and advice to staff on how to conduct these activities safely
  • you may want to consider short-term policy changes such as allowing extensions for returns e.g. from 30 to 60 days
  • remove or limit customer seating in store. If seating is provided, space out appropriately to enable physical distancing
  • all physical distancing and hygiene measures must apply to all elements of the retail premises and business operation, including for example stock rooms, staff areas and locker rooms and deliver points

Fitting rooms


Due to the ongoing low number of COVID-19 cases in Jersey, fitting rooms in shops can now open if they are able to strictly adhere to the public health guidance given below:

Retailers should:

  • ensure that access to fitting rooms is supervised by a member of staff
  • suspend fitting assistance to ensure that contact between customers and staff is limited
  • ensure that chairs and other furniture are removed from the fitting room to minimise touch points and facilitate cleaning - hooks can be provided to hang clothes
  • ensure that all surfaces in the fitting room are wiped clean with an appropriate disinfectant between use by different customers
  • ensure that a signs is clearly displayed asking customers with symptoms to refrain from trying on clothes
  • demonstrate that they have controls in place to ensure that the fitting room has been cleaned prior to their use and that this is communicated to customers (for example displaying a sign saying ‘Fitting room clean - available for use’)
  • demonstrate that they have controls in place to ensure that the fitting room remains after closed after use until it has been cleaned and that this is communicated to customers (for example displaying a sign saying ‘Fitting room awaiting cleaning – not available for use’
  • provide hand sanitiser and ensure that customers must use it before entering the fitting room and after leaving the fitting room
  • ensure that all items of clothing that a customer has taken into the fitting room are date and time labelled and stored for 72 hours before being put back on display

All product testers should be removed from stores, such as makeup or other cosmetics, due to the added risk of viral spread these pose.


Returns

Where businesses are accepting returned items, they should consider isolating these items for a period of at least 72 hours before putting them back out on display.

Gloves should also be worn as added protection for staff when handling returns.

Retail businesses

Under the Safe Exit Level 3, from 18 May all shops are permitted to open. This guidance sets out ways in which such businesses can operate whilst reducing the risk of the spread of COVID-19. 

Large superstores

Large superstores which provide essential goods and services as described in the Safe Exit Level 3 Policy may continue to operate.

Unstaffed side of the road vegetable stalls

The sale of food is categorised as essential. Only one customer should approach a stall at a time ensuring they are two metres from any other customer or person serving from the stall. Where customers are arriving by car they should be encouraged to queue safely. Money should be left directly in the honesty box. If physical distancing is not possible, then they must not open the stall.

Building and plumbing supplies

Hardware stores, builders’ merchants and stores that provide hardware products essential for home and business maintenance, sanitation, along with farm equipment and supplies and tools essential for gardening, farming and/agriculture, are permitted to open and are permitted to sell these products.

Veterinary businesses and pet shops

All pet stores and veterinary businesses providing items for health and welfare of animals, including animal feed and medicines, animal food, pet food, animal supplies including bedding, can remain open and are essential.

Supermarkets

All businesses providing food services should follow the guidance on food safety during a changing business model. 

In addition to the guidance to all retailers supermarkets should consider removing self-serve guns (if applicable) or providing suitable protection (gloves) or cleaning (alcohol wipes) of the guns when they are returned.

Off-licences

Retail and wholesale sale of food, beverages and newspapers are categorised as essential. The sale of intoxicating liquor must be in accordance with the relevant applicable alcohol licensing regulations.

Garden and plant centres

Stores including garden and plant centres that provide hardware products essential for home and business maintenance, sanitation, and farm equipment, supplies for gardening, farming and agriculture, can remain open as essential retail outlets. These stores can also continue to provide other essential services which they operate during the normal course of their businesses. For example, a garden centre can continue to sell essential items for the health and welfare of animals, such as pet food, from their premises if it is something they would normally sell.

Commercial garage servicing vehicles or motorcycles and the repair of boats

Repairing vehicles, motorcycles and boats are essential services. Businesses offering this service can choose to open to provide those services.

Delivery companies and those moving goods around the Island

Islanders may now move home provided they adhere to the guidelines that are in force. Businesses providing removals or relocation services must implement strict physical distancing and good hygiene (see the advice under ‘Safe Exit Advice for all Businesses’). Employees should remain two metres from each other and from customers wherever possible. This includes during travel. Businesses should also ensure rigorous hygiene.

Taxi services

All of the Island’s taxi drivers are categorised as essential workers to help ensure the ongoing provision of public transport around the Island. Taxi drivers must maintain a strict regime of hand hygiene and disinfecting of key touch points within the taxi. It is also advisable that payment is contactless, not cash, to minimise the risk of infection.

People showing symptoms, or who are required to isolate, must not use taxis or public transport. Taxi firms should enquire about this before accepting any fare.

Dry cleaners, laundrettes and other laundry services

Dry cleaning, laundrettes and other laundry service businesses can continue to operate.

They are not permitted to sell any goods or services that are not usually sold in the course of their businesses. Where goods can be collected and returned to the customer, companies are encouraged to offer such a delivery service.

Businesses selling fabric and sewing material

Retailers of fabric and sewing equipment, for the purpose of making cloth face masks, are allowed to open.

Shops that have closed to customers but are selling products online

Retailers may use their premises to fulfil deliveries as long as they comply with the advice for all non-essential businesses and ensure deliveries are conducted safely following the guidelines for safe deliveries.

Dentists

From 1 June dentists are able to open if they are able to follow the public health guidance.

Guidance for putting on PPE for dentists

Guidance for taking off PPE for dentists

Businesses entering private homes for short periods 

In preparation for the move from Safe Exit Level 3 to Safe Exit Level 2 businesses are now able to enter homes for short periods of time in order to obtain the information they require to provide the customer with a quote for work, such as measuring up. Longer periods in others’ homes - for example to carry out work quoted for - remains discouraged in Level 3.  

Businesses are also allowed to enter people’s homes for the purposes of completing deliveries.

When completing such home visits businesses must adhere to the following guidance (in addition to the general guidance that applies to all businesses opening at the current time). 

Prior to visiting the customer’s home:

  1. the customer should be contacted via phone to confirm the day and time of the visit and to confirm that they are not showing any symptoms of COVID-19, are not self-isolating, or shielding because they are severely Vulnerable to Covid -19. If the customer was confirmed to be COVID-19, symptomatic, self isolation or shielding because they are severely vulnerable to COVID-19, the delivery or measuring up would not go ahead
  2. the business is responsible for checking this again on the day of the visit
  3. businesses should hold a log of all homes that have been entered
  4. no more than two measurers, or delivery people will be present at any one property visit
  5. wherever possible the occupier of the property should leave the property whilst the delivery/measuring up is being conducted. Where this is not possible they should stay in a separate room
  6. the home owner is responsible for cleaning the premises before the visit in any areas that the measurer or delivery people may enter or travel through, such as door handles and light switches
  7. the property owner should open all appropriate doors to areas that will need accessing before the measurers/ delivery people arrive 

Those staff will:

  1. maintain a physical distance of 2 metres with those outside their household at all times
  2. sanitising hands on arrival and departure, with the business responsible for providing hand sanitiser for the staff to utilise at the entrance to the property
  3. customers should be advised not to touch anything the business brings into to home, to enable the delivery or measuring up process
  4. the business’s representative should wear gloves and try to ensure that only they touch surfaces, including door handles and light switches
  5. the business’s representative should clean anything that it has been necessary to touch with disinfectant wipes as they move around the property
  6. time in the property should be no more than twenty minutes
  7. wearing of cloth face masks is encouraged 

It is the responsibility of the business owner to make sure that staff and the customer are aware of these conditions and adhere to them.

Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

Hotels / accommodation sector

Must remain closedExceptions
  • hotels
  • hostels
  • B&Bs
  • campsites
  • boarding houses
  • lodging houses for commercial use

Where people live in these as interim abodes whilst their primary residence is unavailable, or they live in them in permanently, they may continue to do so.

Key workers and non-UK residents who are unable to travel to their country of residence during this period can continue to stay in hotels or similar where required.

People who are unable to move into a new home due to the current restrictions can also stay at hotels.

Where hotels, hostels, and B&Bs are providing rooms to support essential workers, or vulnerable people such as those who cannot safely stay in their home, through arrangements with the Government, they may remain open.

​Caravan parks and camping sites
​None

Guidance for hotels looking after those isolating due to COVID-19

Self-catering vacation accommodation

Self-catering vacation accommodation is included in the hotels category and is required to close. However, the same exceptions apply as to hotels and this includes for people living in these as interim abodes while their primary residence is unavailable. This would also be the case for people who move into temporary accommodation while essential emergency home and building repairs are being carried out at their normal residence.

Non-residential institutions

Must remain closedExceptions
LibrariesDigital library services and no-contact home library services should continue
Community centres, youth centres and similarFor the purpose of hosting essential voluntary or public services, such as food banks, homeless services, and blood donation sessions.
Places of worship

Funerals and burials in line with the public health guidance. 

A minister of religion, to go to their place of worship may broadcast an act of worship, whether over the internet or otherwise.

For the purpose of hosting essential voluntary or public service, such as food banks, homeless services, and blood donation sessions.

Parish halls can remain open for the purpose of coordinating and hosting essential voluntary or public services. For any other matter, please contact your Parish by telephone, and do not visit in person.

Funerals and burials

From Monday 1 June, the guidance has changed to allow additional numbers to attend funerals and burials. Funeral attendance is dictated by the type of service taking place and the location where the service is being held due the differing ability to be able to adhere to physical distancing.

The RJA&HS has been approved for funeral services for attendances of up to 40 people, this is provided that strict measures are followed by the venue and Funeral Directors as laid out in their submitted risk assessment. These measures include separate entrances for the family of the deceased and other mourners, allocated seating being provided and organised exiting procedures. Between all services a full deep clean of the venue will take place to ensure that suitable hygiene standards are maintained. 

For services taking place at the Crematorium up to 20 people can now attend, if the service taking place at the graveside up to 10 people can attend. Services for the burial of ashes are now permitted and up to 10 people can attend. Physical distancing measures between members of different households must be maintained throughout any service that takes place at any venue.

It is the responsibility of the Funeral Directors to ensure that these public health measures are adhered to.

Body viewings are in principle now allowed if COVID-19 does not appear on the death certificate. These should be arranged via funeral directors so that they can ensure a risk assessment is completed and the necessary mitigation measures are in place.

Assembly and leisure

Must remain closedExceptions
Museums and galleriesNone
NightclubsNone
Cinemas, theatres and concert venuesNone
Spas and massage parlours           None
​Fort Regent
​For the purposes of work relating to the Government response to COVID-19
Fitness studios, gyms, swimming pools or other indoor leisure facilities, including changing roomsNone
Arcades, bowling alleys, soft play centres and similarNone

Outdoor recreation

Must remain closedExceptions
Playgrounds, paddling pools, outdoor gyms or similar
Outdoor recreational facilities, or the outdoor areas of recreational facilities that have both indoor and outdoor areas (e,g. outdoor areas of heritage sites, gardens associated with attractions, golf courses, outdoor mini-golf courses, tennis courts, lawn bowling greens, equestrian centres, shooting ranges) subject to detailed guidelines.

Businesses that support outdoor recreation

Under the Safe Exit Level 3 Policy businesses or organisations that support outdoor recreation will be able to open if they are able to put necessary public health measures in place to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19.

Note that this guidance is in addition to the general guidance that applies to all businesses opening at the current time. 

All businesses that are selling food should also follow the guidance on food safety during a changing business model.

Two categories of business/organisations are able to open to enable outdoor activities, providing they comply with the public health guidelines set out here.

Outdoor recreational facilities, or the outdoor areas of recreational facilities that have both indoor and outdoor areas

Outdoor recreational facilities are those that are used exclusively or predominantly for outdoor recreation, whether or not they are operated for the purposes of financial gain.

This could include, for example:

  • mini-golf facility
  • tennis courts
  • lawn bowling green
  • equestrian centre or horse-riding school
  • shooting range

Companies offering outdoor recreation services

This could include, for example:

  • outdoor areas of heritage sites, and gardens associated with attractions
  • outdoor activity equipment hire services
  • land based tours (e.g. walking tours)
  • boat tour services (where vessels can carry one household at a time or can maintain physical distancing between people who do not live together)
  • businesses offering training or tuition in lower risk outdoor activities that, with planning, can take place with participants and instructors maintaining a distance of 2 metres from each other (e.g. outdoor yoga / pilates classes and personal training)

Indoor facilities associated with any of the above should remain closed to customers and the public, except for the minimum time possible for the purposes of entry/exit, ticket sales and controlled access to toilet facilities (see general business guidance).

Swimming or paddling pools, alone or as part of larger facility, should remain closed owing to the difficulty in maintaining both physical distancing and adequate hygiene for these facilities.

The outdoor areas of heritage sites, and gardens associated with attractions can open, but the indoor areas should remain closed.

Where these businesses sell food either at kiosks or for takeaway or where al fresco seating is possible in line with the guidance, these facilities may open.

Outdoor recreational activities should only open where it is possible to frequently clean regular touch points.

Equipment should be the customer's own wherever possible and if shared should be disinfected between use by different customers.

Where there is a significant amount of shared equipment or when it is not possible to clean equipment between users the outdoor recreation facility should remain closed.

Sport

Further information on what COVID19 and Safe exit level 3 means for sporting organisations and businesses, can be found on Jersey Sport.

Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

Building work and construction

Emergency repair and maintenance

Essential emergency home and building repair and maintenance works may be carried out by plumbers, electricians, roofers, scaffolders and other tradespeople. This work can be carried out at people’s homes where it is urgent or essential, provided that the tradesperson is well and has no symptoms.

It is vital that public health guidelines, including maintaining a 2 metre distance from any household occupants, are followed to ensure everyone’s safety.

No work should be carried out in any household which is isolating or where an individual is severely vulnerable to COVID-19, unless it is to remedy a direct risk to the safety of the household, such as emergency plumbing or repairs, and where the tradesperson is willing to do so. The isolated person should occupy a different room whilst the work is being carried out, if at all possible. It is important in such circumstances that you ask the householder to explain the problem and the house layout via the phone beforehand if possible.

Entering private homes to quote for work

In preparation for the move from Safe Exit Level 3 to Safe Exit Level 2 businesses are now able to enter homes for short periods of time in order to obtain the information they require to provide the customer with a quote for work, such as measuring up.

Actually carrying out the work in people’s homes is not permitted.

When completing such home visits businesses must adhere to the guidance for Businesses entering people’s homes for the purposes of obtaining information required for a quote or to complete deliveries.

Construction sites and services

Must remain closedExceptions
From 4 April, all construction sites and services

Construction site/services that have received a new permit to operate under the Construction Scheme can operate. 

All construction sites should have closed down on Friday 3 April. Construction sites are controlled by Law in connection with Covid-19 and Permits are required for any construction activity or site where more than two people are present.

Construction activities which only involve one or two people, and which have safe operating procedures, can operate without requiring Government permission, provided that physical distancing and hygiene instructions are adhered to at all times.

The conditions for being able to work are:

  • the guidelines on physical distancing and good hand hygiene must be adhered to at all times, including travel (from home)
  • no more than two people can be undertaking the work
  • the work is not within an occupied dwelling (for example, work in gardens and to the exterior of buildings, or inside an unoccupied property, is permitted but work which involves being inside an occupied property is not permitted)
  • the guidelines for safety relating to lone working (for example, procedures for working safely alone) must be followed
  • this work is classed as non-essential work therefore no worker should carry documentation asserting that they are engaged in essential work. Police and other enforcement agents will be monitoring for abuse of essential worker status closely.

Construction sites

A construction site is defined as such if the company or individual is required to comply with the Health and Safety Construction (Jersey) Regulations 2016

Permits are required for any construction activity or site where more than two people are present.

Apply for a construction site permit

Sites that have permits will be given posters that they must display to show that they have been allowed to operate and must comply with the requirements to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.

Financial support is available to the industry through the Coronavirus Payroll Co-Funding Scheme, Phase 2.

If you are uncertain about whether you are affected, email constructionCOVID@gov.je.

Manual work and physical distancing

In some areas of essential manual work, groups of employees are required to operate together to ensure work is completed safely. In these instances, the 2 metre physical distancing guide should be used as best practice. Every effort should be made where possible to observe the distance during work, and when travelling to and from work but we recognise this might not always be possible. Workers must also follow rigorous hygiene procedures, especially when returning home for the day. It is particularly important that employees working in this way should not come to work if they develop any of the COVID-19 symptoms. Instead, they should isolate along with their household.

Businesses that support people moving home

Property viewings for the purposes of property sales or rentals

Under the Safe Exit Level 3 Policy in order to enable the purchasing, sale and rental of properties Estate Agents, Property Management Companies and Surveyors are now able to carry out property viewings for the purposes of property sales or rentals.

This guidance sets out ways in which such businesses can operate whilst reducing the risk of the spread of COVID-19. 

Note that this guidance is in addition to the general guidance that applies to all businesses opening at the current time. 

Property viewings, valuations and rental inspections

When planning and carrying out property viewings, valuations or rental inspections the following conditions should be met.

Prior to visiting the property:

  • the prospective customer should pre-register with the business providing all contact details 
  • all relevant parties (agent, property owner, property occupier, purchaser, surveyor etc) should provide a declaration to the business that they are not showing any symptoms of COVID-19
  • the property visit cannot be carried out if any property occupier is isolating either because they have COVID-19, are symptomatic, or are shielding because they are severely vulnerable to COVID-19.  The business is responsible for confirming this prior to the property visit
  • all property visits should be carried out at an appointed time by one business representative only
  • businesses should hold a log of all property visits undertaken
  • not more than one agent and two vendors or purchasers (adults only) will be present at any one property visit
  • the viewing will be deemed to be part of the customer’s permitted time outside the house and the total permitted contacts from outside their household in line with the Government of Jersey guidance
  • viewings should be undertaken at an empty property wherever possible.  Where this is not possible the viewing should coincide with the usual occupant’s permitted time outside the house in line with the Government of Jersey guidance
  • the property owner is responsible for cleaning the premises before the visit – as a minimum this must include the cleaning of surfaces that are regularly touched, and those which the agent will have to touch, such as door handles and light switches
  • the property owner should open all appropriate doors and cupboards prior to the viewing
  • paper copies of the property details should not be supplied to potential purchasers

During the property visit

All necessary precautions should be taken during the viewing including:
  • maintaining a physical distance of 2 metres with those outside your household at all times
  • sanitising hands on arrival and departure, with the business responsible for providing hand sanitiser at the entrance to the property
  • customers should be advised not to touch anything
  • the business’s representative should wear gloves and try to ensure that only they touch surfaces, including door handles and light switches
  • the business’s representative should clean anything that it has been necessary to touch with disinfectant wipes as they move around the property
  • viewings should be no more than twenty minutes
  • wearing of cloth face masks is encouraged

It is the responsibility of the business to ensure that their customers are made aware of the above conditions and that they adhere to them. 

If it is not possible to adhere to the above conditions, then the property visit should not go ahead.

Open viewings and back to back viewings

Open viewings and back to back viewings are not permitted.

Removal and relocation services

To support Islanders who need to move home, essential removals and relocation is designated as ‘essential work’ and workers providing these services can travel outside the home for this purpose. Businesses providing removals or relocation services must implement strict physical distancing. Employees should remain two metres from each other and from customers at all times. This includes during travel. Businesses should also ensure rigorous hygiene.

Farm and agricultural businesses

Farm and agricultural work is designated as essential work, as it is important in the provision of food for the population.

All farm workers should ensure they maintain a distance of two metres from each other as much as practically possible, during work, and when travelling to and from work. This might mean that workers need to travel in additional vehicles. It is recognised that some types of farm work may make it hard or unsafe for workers to stay two metres apart at times. Workers should consider when this may happen and minimise the number of occasions when they come closer than two metres to each other and keep the duration of those occasions as short as possible.

Farm and agricultural workers should also follow rigorous hygiene procedures, especially when returning home for the day. They must make sure that any surfaces that are likely to come into contact with more than one person, such as door handles and steering wheels, are cleaned regularly.

It is particularly important that farm and agricultural workers should not come to work if they develop any of the COVID-19 symptoms. If they develop symptoms, they should immediately isolate at their home, along with everyone in their household. Where workers are living in shared accommodation it should be noted that all workers within that residential unit would be classified as a ‘household’ and should observe isolation for the whole household accordingly.

Owing to the risk of multiple employees contracting COVID-19, and therefore being unwell and required to isolate at the same, farm managers could consider how they can further protect their staff. For example, by discussing with workers how they are physically distancing and practising robust hygiene measures outside working hours as well as within.

The abattoir remains open as it is considered critical for farming and maintaining Jersey’s food supply.

Cleaning services

Cleaning services for essential working environments

Employees providing cleaning services for essential working environments are essential workers and may continue to provide a service. They must put in place measures to ensure that physical distancing is maintained between all employees and in any interaction with customers. If this is not possible then they must not provide the service. 

To reduce the risk of infection spreading, cleaning service companies should minimise the number of sites each member of cleaning staff works across. This is particularly important for health and care settings. 

Managers of cleaning services should ensure all employees are aware of infection control procedures, including strict hand hygiene protocols. Strict waste disposal guidance should be in place to reduce the risk of infection.

Cleaning offices where there are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19

Once symptomatic, all surfaces that the person has come into contact with must be cleaned including:

  • all surfaces and objects which are visibly contaminated with body fluids
  • all potentially contaminated high-contact areas such as toilets, door handles, telephones

Public areas where someone with the infection has passed through and spent minimal time in (such as corridors) but which are not visibly contaminated with body fluids do not need to be specially cleaned and disinfected.

If a person becomes ill in a shared space, it should be cleaned using disposable cloths and household detergents, according to current recommended workplace legislation and practice.

Domestic cleaning

Domestic cleaning services should only be provided if absolutely necessary. Domestic cleaners must not meet with members of private households. Where possible, householders should not be in their house or flat for the duration of the cleaning. Workers must not be in a group of more than 2 and physical distancing must be maintained.

If the householder lives alone and only one cleaner is present, the householder may remain in the home if it is impracticable for them to leave, providing physical distancing of 2 metres between people is maintained.

Managers of domestic cleaning services should ensure that all employees are aware of infection control procedures, including strict hand hygiene protocols. Strict waste disposal guidance should be in place to reduce the risk of infection.

Domestic cleaners should not enter a household where any member of the household has COVID-19 symptoms.

High pressure cleaning

Businesses are advised to stop high pressure cleaning in public areas of bins, benches and anything that has come into contact with sewage. In such circumstances alternative cleaning methods, such as wiping down with appropriate cleaning products, should be adopted.

For other circumstances where businesses carry out high pressure cleaning activities, these can continue, following the guidance on physical distancing, if an appropriate risk assessment is carried out.

Indoor workplaces

This guidance applies to indoor workplaces such as offices, warehouses, manufacturing and workshops.

This guidance does not apply to businesses and premises that must remain closed, as set out in the COVID-19 Safe Exit Framework: Level 3 Policy. These include services that involve close personal contact.

In the case of outdoor working, retail, and leisure business activities, other guidance applies the sectors and industry-specific guidance for: outdoor working, retail, hospitality and leisure business.

From the date of the publication of this guidance, the Financial and Legal Services Schemes will no longer apply and those businesses will also be able to resume business activity in accordance with this guidance.

The opening of indoor business at Level 3

You must consider whether or not it is essential to the business functioning for employees to return to the workplace. If it is not essential and/or home-working can continue, employees should not be asked to return to the workplace during Level 3.  

For some businesses, it is not possible to enable all employees to work from home. From the 21 May, indoor business such as offices, warehouses, manufacturing and workshops may return to their premises to resume some workplace-based activity, where this is considered essential to maintain the business function and where this work cannot be otherwise be undertaken from home.

Every business or organisation opening during the COVID-19 pandemic should plan in advance how they are going to reduce the risk of spreading the virus during the course of operating. A risk assessment must be undertaken and appropriate measures put in place before opening to reduce and manage the risk of coronavirus transmission. Crucially, this means that the number of people working within the building must be able to comfortably maintain physical distancing at all times and there must be adequate welfare and hygiene provisions made available. In many cases, this will mean that the number of employees able to return to the workplace will remain considerably limited.

A record of the risk assessment and plan should be available for inspection by the relevant authorities, including the Health and Safety Inspectorate, upon request.

When you open, you may wish to display a 'we are workplace ready' poster to demonstrate that you have you have followed the indoor workplace guidelines.

Workplace compliance poster

Workplace hygiene poster

Lift usage poster

Meeting room poster

More poster formats for print and digital

Guidance for office-based working

Risk assessments must be undertaken in a way that is bespoke to your office environment and the way that your business operates.

In the cases where an office is within a building occupied by others, an additional risk assessment that covers the communal areas shared with people outside of your organisation will need to be developed. The plan for communal areas should have regard to this Public Health guidance and be developed in collaboration with the other occupants of the building and those with authorisation for the management of the areas (such as facilities management and landlords), depending on the specific ownership and management structure of the premises.

In addition to the general guidance for business, measures to consider to support effective hygiene and social distancing in an office environment might include:

  • limit and control the number of staff in the building at any one time, which may include staggering arrival, departure and break times or shift patterns. At Level 3, you should continue to support and encourage employees to work from home where this is possible. Staff should only return to the workplace in the cases where it is considered essential to the business functioning
  • using markings, introducing one-way flows (where possible) and introducing policies for movement etiquette at entry and exit points and throughout the building
  • ensuring access to adequate handwashing facilities (i.e. liquid soap, water and disposable hand towels) and hand sanitiser (with 60-70% alcohol content) prominently available throughout the building
  • restricting access to areas such as small meeting rooms, and limiting the number of people in confined spaces such as kitchens, toilets, lifts and changing rooms (such as a one in, one out policy)
  • review and adapt workstations and other work areas to ensure all reasonably practicable steps have been undertaken to ensure a minimum space of 2 metres can be maintained. This may involve identifying desks and seating areas that should not be occupied and restricting access to them. It may also be appropriate to use tape floor markings to ensure spacing can be clearly maintained
  • workstations should be assigned to an individual for the duration of their working shift. If workstations need to be shared with those working a different shift pattern, each workstation should be kept to a minimum number of people and cleaned between users
  • identify and implement ways you can support staff travelling to work using their own means (walk, cycle or car) to reduce the need to travel by public transport
  • ensure that cleaning contracts and enhanced procedures have been put in place in preparation for the return to office working. This may include ensuring that suitable cleaning products are available for office staff to use outside of the regular cleaning times (such as to disinfect workstations and printers in between uses)

Further advice on working safely in offices on gov.uk

Guidance for warehouse and workshop-based businesses

A risk assessment addressing the control of Covid-19 transmission must be undertaken in the exactly the same way as you will have done for all of the other significant hazards and risks associated with your working activities.

It is especially important to make sure that any additional measures you need to introduce to manage the risks of COVID-19 are properly resourced and do not comprise the other every day risks you need to manage.

Experience shows that in many high risk workplaces, such as warehouses, motor vehicle repair shops, joineries and other workshop-based businesses, it may be necessary to provide additional resource, whether in-house or through external contractors, to help provide adequate supervision and to implement enhanced hygiene and physical distancing procedures whilst also maintaining control over your typical high risk activities.

In addition to the general guidance for business, measures to consider in order to support effective hygiene and physical distancing in a warehouse or workshop environment might include:

  • considering who is essential to be on site, for example, office or admin staff may be able to work from home. Where it is possible for staff to work from home, they should continue to do so. Plan the work to minimise the number of people needed to be on the premises at anyone time to operate safely and effectively
  • staggering arrival and departure times at work to reduce crowding into and out of the workplace, particularly if you only have one entry point
  • using markings and one-way flow at entry and exit points and throughout the workplace
  • reducing movement by discouraging non-essential trips within the workplace and restricting access to areas such as small meeting rooms, and limiting the number of people in confined spaces such as kitchens, toilets and changing rooms (such as a one in, one out policy)
  • reviewing workplace layouts and work processes, including position of machinery and storage of materials etc., to ensure that all reasonably practicable steps have been undertaken to ensure that people are able to work whilst maintaining a minimum of 2 metres physical distance
  • ensuring access to adequate handwashing facilities (i.e. liquid soap, water and disposable hand towels) and hand sanitiser (with minimum 60% alcohol content) prominently available throughout the workplace
  • encouraging increased handwashing, and where necessary, introduce additional handwashing facilities, for people handling equipment, goods and merchandise. Where this not readily available, provide appropriate hand sanitiser
  • wherever possible, making sure portable tools are not shared between different people. Where this cannot be avoided, carefully considering what controls and cleaning procedures are required, for example wearing of gloves which are disposed of after each use
  • considering cleaning procedures required when plant, machinery or tools must be used by more than one person, for example fork lift trucks, vehicle lifts, woodworking machinery, pallet trucks etc
  • identifying areas where people may have to pass things to each other, for example, drawings, spare parts, raw materials etc and put in place all reasonably practicable measures to remove direct contact and ensure 2 metres physical distancing, such as through the use of drop off points or transfer zones
  • putting in place all reasonably practicable procedures to minimise person-to-person contact during deliveries to customers or sites
  • reviewing pick-up and drop-off collection points, procedures, signage and markings
  • considering methods to reduce frequency of deliveries, for example by ordering larger quantities less often
  • wherever possible, using mechanical means to load and off-load deliveries. Where maintaining physical distance will not be possible during deliveries, you should consider whether or not the activity/delivery should go ahead. If the activity is essential, try to use the same pairs of people to carry the work if 2 metres distancing can’t be maintained and consider other protective measures such as cloth masks
  • whenever possible, when delivering goods or materials, there should be only one person per delivery vehicle. At the point of delivery encourage drivers to stay in their vehicles where this does not compromise their safety and existing safe working practice, such as preventing drive-aways. You should also consider other protective measures (such as cloth masks) and ensure regular cleaning of vehicles
  • identify and implement ways you can support staff travelling to work using their own means (walk, cycle or car) to reduce the need to travel by public transport
  • when you are already using PPE and/or RPE in your work activity to protect against non-COVID-19 risks you should continue to do so. It is not necessary to wear extra PPE/ RPE as a precautionary measure


Businesses that provide animal-related services

Veterinary businesses and pet stores

All pet stores and veterinary businesses providing items for health and welfare of animals, including animal feed and medicines, animal food, pet food, animal supplies including bedding, can remain open and are essential retail.

Business should follow guidance for retailers that are currently permitted to open.

Where goods can be delivered, companies are encouraged to offer a home delivery service.

Clients should be informed that all non-essential trips to vets should be avoided. If urgent treatment is needed, clients must be advised to phone the vet to arrange the best approach to meet the animals’ needs.

Boarding kennels and catteries

Boarding kennels and catteries can provide a valuable service caring for pets of essential workers and those who become seriously ill and have no one else to look after their pet.

They may remain open if they maintain 2 metres physical distancing between staff and between staff and owners when animals arrive or are collected. There must be a regime of strict hand hygiene and the disinfecting of key touch points such as gates, doors and any shared equipment like leads.

Dog groomers

Dog groomers can continue to work where they do not pose a risk to public health. This means they must enforce strict physical distancing between staff, and between staff and owners when animals arrive or are collected. All equipment must be disinfected.

Professional dog walkers

Dog walkers can continue to work where they do not pose a risk to public health. They must follow the guidance on physical distancing for their staff and owners when animals are collected. 

Walkers should not make visits between multiple households or mix dogs from separate households when walking. They should not enter their clients’ homes and they should disinfect any items that the householder and the dog may have come into contact with, such as leads, before and after use.

Horse livery yards 

Livery yards can only remain open where they do not pose a risk to public health. The public health risk applies to both clients and/ or the yard manager, owner of their staff.

A number of factors need to be considered in risk assessing and reducing the public health risk both to staff and clients. These might include:

  • the location and configuration of the yard itself
  • the number of horses and clients involved
  • whether the yard is at the owner’s home
  • the amount of time that the owner or their staff spend on the yard
  • back up staff availability should the primary staff member become ill and unable to attend the yard
  • the amount of time necessary to spend disinfecting touch points, providing hand washing facilities and enforcing physical distancing

If a yard remains open they must strictly enforce physical distancing for their staff and clients at all times. There must be a regime of strict hand hygiene and the disinfecting of key touch points on the yard for example gates, stable doors, any communal equipment. Measures that may help adhere to the physical distancing guidelines include:

  • allowing only named individuals to enter
  • a clear time separation for owners to attend their horses to minimise footfall on the yard
  • considering sharing the care of animals

The primary focus of the yard manger should be the welfare of the animals in their care.

If any of the above factors cause the yard owner to spend disproportional amounts of time on reducing the public health risk, to the detriment of attending to animal welfare of the animals in their care, then they should close their yard to external clients. For further advice call the Government of Jersey Animal Health and Welfare team on +(0)1534 441617 or email rva@gov.je.

Farriers

Farriers can continue to operate where they do not pose a risk to public health. This means they must strictly follow the guidance on physical distancing for their staff and clients. You should discuss with your farrier the best approach to meet your horses’ needs. You and the farrier must ensure that you keep 2 metres apart and wash your hands before and after contact with the horse.

Independent equine grooms and instructors

These categories of workers can continue to operate where they do not pose a risk to public health. This means they must strictly follow the guidance on physical distancing ensuring they keep two metres apart from clients, and they must wash their hands before and after contact with the horse and equipment.

Businesses that offer non-essential outdoor services away from their own premises

Businesses that offer non-essential outdoor services away from their own premises, such as gardening, or window cleaning, can continue to provide services as long as no more than 6 people are gathered at one time. They must be able to enforce strict physical distancing at all times including travelling to and from the place of work, and at all times during the course of the work. 

Building work such as external decorating, should follow the building work and construction advice.

Business support

Information on the support that is available to businesses can be found on Government support for businesses.  Further advice is on the Jersey Business website.



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