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Advice for businesses during Level 2

Updated guidance as of Friday 26 June 2020

We have updated the guidance below as of Friday 26 June 2020 for:

From Wednesday 1 July, food and drink venues including pubs and bars may open for an alcohol only seated service following public health guidelines.

About Level 2

The aim of the Safe Exit Framework is to ease restrictions as quickly as possible, while avoiding a sudden and rapid increase in infections and minimising other indirect health, social and economic impacts.

Level 2 is about being safer together as we move towards a ‘new normal’ of living with COVID-19. Together, we must achieve a balance of becoming more social, gathering a little more, opening activities, and beginning some connectivity off-Island without triggering an upsurge of infections. 

Anyone can catch COVID-19 and anyone can spread it. We reduce the risk of doing this by remembering the measures below: 

  • safer hygiene
  • safer at a distance
  • safer in small groups
  • safer outside

Work and business: key Level 2 policy measures

In Level 4, businesses and organisations undertaking work essential to the running of the Island were permitted to continue to operate at minimum staffing levels and within strict public health guidelines.

In Level 3, non-essential business began re-opening in a careful and staged way – beginning with outdoor services and facilities, and then extending to retail and indoor workplaces while limiting staff numbers on site to those indispensable to business functioning.

In Level 2, the aim is to progress further in a safe, managed way towards a ‘new normal’ for business. Businesses should continue to enable working from home as the default operating model wherever that is possible, but increased business activity in workplaces will be possible, within strict guidelines.

As business activity resumes, in careful stages, employers are also strongly encouraged to be flexible in recognition of the risks and constraints the pandemic is imposing on workers and their families:

  • consider if any of your staff are vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, or live with someone who is high risk to serious complications of COVID-19, and how you can help them to return to work with additional mitigation in place where needed and possible
  • an individual whose age or condition makes them vulnerable to serious complications of COVID-19, and who wishes to return to work, is encouraged to seek medical advice if there is uncertainty as to how to return to work safely
  • if a member of staff has a condition that puts them in the higer risk category, they should not be required to return to work

Try to enable staff who care for children to stay at home while schools and nurseries are closed for those children. 

From Level 2, there is no longer a distinction in our public health guidance for essential and non-essential work. An essential and critical worker list will however continue to be used with regard to education until the point at which schools are fully reopened.

A careful increase of business activity in workplaces

Businesses and organisations already able to open may return more employees to the workplace, within the requirements of strict physical distancing and hygiene, and paying regard to sector-specific guidance. This means you may increase the number of employees beyond the number considered essential to business functioning, as was required in Level 3.

Depending upon the numbers involved, any increase in staff numbers in a workplace may need to be done in phases. If you have already undertaken a risk assessment for Level 3, this needs to be updated at Level 2 if you are intending to increase staff numbers and activity at this stage.

However, at this stage of the pandemic, businesses are still strongly advised to allow working from home as a default where it is possible to do so.

Businesses that can open

At Level 2, unless specified in the section below, all businesses and organisations may open and should strictly observe all public health guidance and sector-specific regulations on physical distancing and hygiene.

Compliance spot checks will take place to ensure businesses and organisations are complying with these requirements.

Business and premises that must remain closed

The businesses and premises listed in this section must remain closed. If a sector or business is not listed, it may open fully within all relevant guidelines.

Food and drink

Food and drink venues offering indoor or outdoor seated food service may open within guidelines.

From Wednesday 1 July, food and drink venues including pubs and bars may open for an alcohol only seated service following public health guidelines.

Sport and leisure

All shared use showers, and changing facilities, associated with sports and leisure venues, including those in hotels, campsites and similar should remain closed.

Children's indoor play areas, such as soft play centres, should also remain closed owing to the difficulties in maintaining hygiene and physical distancing. 

Advice for all businesses

Guiding principles for all businesses and activities at Level 2

This guidance supports all businesses and organisations that are now permitted to open in identifying how they can adapt their practices to significantly increase safety for staff and customers in the face of COVID-19 and to reduce the risk as they begin to open and resume activity in the workplace. 

The guidance is split into 2 sections. Firstly, this 'Advice for all businesses' section which is the core guidance which all businesses that are now operating should adhere to and secondly, sector specific guidance for particular business activities.

Risk assessments and put a plan in place

Every business or organisation opening during the COVID-19 pandemic should plan in advance how they are going to reduce the risk of spreading the virus during the course of operating. This includes undertaking a risk assessment that is bespoke your work environment, practices and services that you provide. Your risk assessment and plans for resuming business activity should respond to this public health advice for all business and the advice for your sector, and address how you will continue to meet the obligations set out in the Health and Safety at Work (Jersey) Law 1989, in all respects.

Businesses have 2 critical areas to consider:

  • protection of staff and their families
  • protection of customers and their families 

It is important to engage your staff in how to reduce risk. Their involvement and commitment will be key to reducing risk for everyone. Before a business opens, staff will need to understand how to minimise the risk of the spread of COVID-19 and be provided with training where appropriate. Organisations should have a written plan and risk assessment and share it with staff.

This plan should consider the core guidance that applies to all businesses as well as the industry specific advice which will be relevant to your particular business operations.

All employers should encourage and support staff to follow the advice on protecting yourself and others against COVID-19. This includes:

  • wash your hands or use sanitising gel  (with 60-70% alcohol content)
  • avoid touching your face
  • catch your cough or sneeze in a tissue, bin it and wash your hands
  • clean surfaces and shared toilets regularly
  • cloth masks are strongly recommended in enclosed public spaces such as shops and on public transport
  • if you have flu-like symptoms, stay or go home immediately and call the Helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566

Businesses are also reminded that all existing legislation and regulations that apply to their operations remain in place.  This includes, for example, Health and Safety at Work, planning and building control, environmental health, licencing requirements etc.

Posters on COVID-19 to print and display

Symptoms

If any member of staff reports feeling unwell with symptoms of COVID-19, they must not be permitted onto your premises, and if possible should not travel to their place of work. 

They should follow isolation guidance and phone the Coronavirus Help Line on +44 (0) 1534 445566. They may be entitled to COVID-19 specific sickness benefit

You should establish procedures as to what to do if a member of staff or a customer becomes unwell on the premises, to ensure isolation from others as soon as possible. This should include a log of the date and time of the occurrence, should contact tracing become necessary.

First aid during COVID-19

You should have a first aid plan in place in case a customer or employee develops symptoms during their time on the premises, and also should anyone require first aid during the pandemic.

You should refer to Health and Safety inspectorate advice on carrying out first aid.

Hand washing

Staff should be encouraged and supported to wash their hands as guided in the following circumstances:

  • on arrival at work
  • after touching hand contact surfaces such as handrails, door handles, light switches
  • after using the toilet or going into the toilet areas
  • after touching their face, sneezing or coughing
  • after smoking
  • after handling and opening packaging, money, receipts, and cleaning supplies
  • after removing gloves and before putting on new ones
  • after touching rubbish

Staffing during COVID-19

As business activity resumes, in careful stages, employers are also strongly encouraged to be flexible in recognition of the risks and constraints the pandemic is imposing on workers and their families. Employers are encouraged to consider if any staff are at risk of serious complications of COVID-19, or live with someone who is, or if they have childcare obligations while the schools and nurseries are closed.

Staff vulnerable to COVID-19

Employers should refer to information on shielding for a list of those conditions that put someone at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and for relevant public health advice on whether they are able to work.

People that are living with someone who at risk of serious complications of COVID-19 do not need to adopt the protective shielding measures themselves. They should do what they can to support the person shielding and they should stringently follow guidance on physical distancing, reducing their contact outside the home.  

They should refer to the guidance on shielding for further information on how they can do this.

Childcare provision

Schools, nurseries and childcare started gradually reopening on Monday 8 June.  However, schools are currently only open to certain year groups and under strict conditions which means that children are unlikely to be in school on a full-time basis before the end of the summer term. 

Employers are therefore encouraged to be flexible and where possible allow parents to stay at home to care for their children while schools and nurseries are only partially open. 

Reopening of schools, early years settings and childcare

Economic support

There is economic support available for both businesses and workers.

Government support for businesses

Coronavirus Financial Support brief information and guidance for employees

Protect customers, workers and their families

Ensure that you enable everyone to follow the public health guidance.

You should consider what measures you can take to help everyone on your premises or engaging with your business to follow public health advice. This should include staff, customers and any other permitted visitors.

It is important to make it easy for people to comply. 

Physical distancing in the workplace

You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing of 1 metre between everyone on your premises including staff, customers and any other permitted visitors wherever possible. 

Measures to do this will depend on your business operations but might include:

  • limiting the numbers of staff or customers allowed on the premises or part of the premises at any one time
  • introducing a by appointment or reservation only service 
  • taking orders and payment over the phone for pick up or delivery only to reduce the time spent on the premises
  • marking out walk-ways to control the flow of pedestrian movement and if possible, designate one-way entrances and exits.
  • prepare to minimise and control customers queuing for services or using toilet facilities if open
  • reducing or spacing out the number of tables, workstations and seating areas
  • changing working patterns (for example, staff restocking shelves when the shop is closed to customers)
  • signage and posters can be put in place to support physical distancing and hygiene
  • think about how to maintain physical distancing when deliveries are made to your premises. Schedule deliveries to avoid crowding in delivery areas and consider non-contact stock deliveries
  • consider how staff security checks can be managed while maintaining physical distancing if these are carried out
  • staff who go outside the premises for a break should maintain physical distancing while doing so

Gathering and events (updated 29 July)

During Level 2, the advice continues to be to avoid large gatherings of people to help suppress any possible outbreaks of COVID-19.

  • social gatherings in private settings, such as parties, barbecues or informal get-togethers should be limited to a maximum of 20 people in Level 2 and these gatherings should only occur if you are confident everyone will maintain physical distancing
  • more controlled events such as marriage and funeral ceremonies, organised sports, community and group activities and managed events should be limited to a maximum of up to 40 people in Level 2 and should only occur if you are confident that everyone will maintain physical distancing and the other public health guidance. Any event that can demonstrate adherence to the Draft Guidance for small scale controlled events and gatherings can be defined as controlled and can have up to 40 people in Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework

Businesses and organisations are strongly advised to keep meetings and team events small, and online where possible. If a physical event is required, they should be planned and structured to maintain safe distancing, and only involve up to a maximum of 40 people; you should follow the above guidance on gatherings and help your customers to do likewise. 

Keep a guest list of attendees. This could support contact tracing if it is later discovered that one of the attendees had COVID-19.

Singing, woodwind and brass

In all business, social and community contexts, singing, in addition to woodwind and brass music, is strongly discouraged both outdoors and indoors because of the very high risk of dispersing droplets and therefore of spreading infection. This is particularly important in indoor settings and around members of the public who may be more vulnerable and increased of severe illness from COVID-19.

One-to-one singing, woodwind and brass lessons should also not happen in person at this time, with video-conferencing encouraged as an alternative.

Sanitising hands

Customers should be encouraged to sanitise their hands upon arrival at a business premises. 

Hand sanitiser (with 60-70% alcohol content) should be placed at entrances with a sign asking customers to use it before entering.

Those with skin conditions that mean they cannot use sanitiser should have their own single use disposable gloves and wear these.

Contactless payments

Businesses are asked to strongly encourage customers to pre-pay over the phone or pay using contactless payment methods wherever possible. It may be necessary to split the bill into multiple payments to facilitate this. 

If another form of payment is required, provide enough disposable gloves for staff to be able to change them regularly, and staff should be advised to wash their hands before putting on a new pair.

Deliveries

When making deliveries:

  • follow the guidance for working in vehicles
  • maintain a physical distance of 1 metre between staff, and between staff and customers wherever possible
  • explain to customers how the delivery will work by phone or email in advance 
  • take payment in advance of delivery wherever possible
  • if a handheld device is used do not hand it to a customer; instead ask the customer to stand back, place it on a convenient spot before stepping away, allow the customer to complete the transaction; the customer should then step back to allow collection of the handheld device. The device should be cleaned before and after each transaction
  • avoid cash where possible
  • where a delivery won't fit through a letterbox, place it at the customer's door, or in an outdoor location. Knock on the door, and step aside to a safe distance while the customer retrieves their item or confirms delivery
  • where proof of receipt is required, consider enabling the delivery staff to log the name of the person accepting the item on their behalf  
  • where possible, the customer should take receipt of a delivery outside and transport the item into their home themselves. If delivery staff need to enter a house to deliver an item they should use the external door nearest to the final indoor location. Householders should stay at least 1 metre away, or ideally in another room. The delivery workers should leave promptly
  • delivery workers should not enter a household where anyone is isolating for confirmed or suspected COVID-19. Ensure delivery workers know they can abort a delivery and reschedule if they believe that entering a home could be a risk to them or the customer
  • all workers should be able to wash their hands with alcohol-based hand sanitiser (with 60-70% alcohol content) before and after each delivery. They should also aim to wash their hands with soap and water periodically during the day

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

The evidence shows that using PPE in lower risk situations only has a minimal reduction of risk. PPE use is therefore reserved for known higher-risk situations, ensuring that workers who most need it can be protected appropriately to the level of risk they face.  The business guidance reflects this, with PPE only referred to in sector specific guidance for dentists and registered and allied health professions and services.

PPE for clinical settings, for example gloves, gowns and facemasks are designed to protect staff from infection risks. The people most at risk of COVID-19 infection are those who are in close contact within a  2 metre distance for a time of 15 minutes or more, of someone who has tested positive or who is suspected of having COVID-19.

When managing the risk of COVID-19, additional PPE beyond what you usually wear is not beneficial. This is because COVID-19 is a different type of risk to the risks you normally face in a workplace, and needs to be managed through maintaining a safe distance, hygiene and fixed teams or partnering, not through the use of PPE.

There is also routine PPE, which protects the user against health or safety risks at work. It can include items such as safety helmets, gloves, eye protection, high-visibility clothing, safety footwear and safety harnesses. It also includes respiratory protective equipment, such as face masks.  Where you are already using PPE in your work activity to protect against non-COVID-19 risks, you should continue to do so.

If you work in health care and your work requires you to come into close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case or someone who is symptomatic, for example in the case of home care, then you should follow the PPE guidance for healthcare professionals.

Face coverings such as cloth masks

All islanders are encouraged to cover their mouth and nose with a scarf, snood, folded cloth or cloth mask when outside of home, especially in enclosed public spaces such as public transport and shops. A cloth mask is additional, not a substitute for strict physical distancing, or good hand and respiratory hygiene.

Collecting contact information

This  guidance is to help support businesses to collect customer information for the purposes of contact tracing. The Jersey Office of the Information Commissioner (JOIC) has published a checklist for businesses called Track & Trace Personal Information which sets out how businesses can navigate their legal responsibilities in collecting personal data to assist Government with track and trace of COVID-19.  

It is important that you read the checklists whether or not you already collect information from customers for other business purposes.

Why are we asking for contact detail collection?

As we move through the Safe Exit Framework contact tracing has an increasingly important role to play in Jersey's COVID-19 strategy and to help keep each other safe.

Following the relaxation of measures, the number of close contact social interactions that individuals have will increase – close contact is direct or less than 2 metres for more than 15 minutes. it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person.

Contact tracing allows us to identify those that are at the highest risk of having caught the virus from a person who has been confirmed as having COVID-19 through a positive PCR test. The contact tracing process only starts when there has been a confirmed case of COVID-19 established through a positive PCR test.

The collection of simple contact information from customers allows the contact tracing team to help protect others who have been in close contact with someone who is a confirmed case of COVID-19 through the track and trace process.

Collecting information for the purpose of contact tracing

Upon arrival, you should ask customers to share their contact details, explaining why you are doing so and providing them with the information required by the Data Protection (Jersey) Law. This can be in the form of an information sheet or written notice or it can be verbal. See the guidance published by the JOIC if you are not sure how to do this.

You should also ask customers for their consent to you collecting their information and to you sharing it with the Government. Again, please refer to the guidance published by the JOIC for details on how to collect appropriate consent.

If the customer consents, you should ask them to provide the following information that is needed by the contact tracing team:

  • Full Name
  • Mobile contact number
  • Date and time of arrival

Confirming consent is given
No further information is needed for track and trace, so please do not collect or provide us with any further details. 

Looking after customer information

  • You may already be collecting data for other purposes such as marketing and it is important that the data collected for track and trace purposes is not merged with this data or used for any other purpose than to provide it to the Government when requested.  You should not, for example, ask customers if they will also consent to the data being provided to be used for marketing communications, as this may make individuals reluctant to provide their contact details for track and trace purposes. . Further understanding of this is available from the JOIC.
  • You cannot deny a patron entry or service if they refuse to consent to the collection of their information.
  • Staff members must be briefed that the customer information they are collecting is confidential and for the purposes of contact tracing only.
  • Customer information you collect, on paper or electronically, should be kept for 21 days. After this period, you must ensure it is securely destroyed. A daily procedure designated to an appropriate staff member may help you with this.
  • The data collected must be kept securely and should not be accessible to anyone who doesn't have a reason associated with contact tracing to see it. This means that each customer should complete a separate form or provide their details in a manner that would not allow others to see them. For example, customers should not be asked to add their details to a list that contains the personal data of customers who had previously provided their information earlier in the day, and completed forms should not be left unsecured. Each person's personal data must be kept confidential. 
  • You may wish to put an information sheet together for customers to allow them to understand how their customer information will be used to help protect them and others if contact tracing is required including:
    • Customer information collected will not be used for any other purposes than contact tracing by the Government of Jersey, in the event of a positive test for Covid-19. It will not be used for other purposes such as marketing.
    • Information requested by the contact tracing team will only be used for the purposes of contact tracing. If requested, it will be kept securely on Government of Jersey systems and securely destroyed when no longer needed.
    • Contact tracers will not reveal the identity of the person who has tested positive without their consent

      Cleaning premises and equipment

      To prevent the risk of viral spread on surfaces, it is essential that normal cleaning regimes are enhanced, and the frequency increased. 

      General cleaning 

      There should be particular emphasis on surfaces that are regularly touched by staff and customers, for example:

      • door handles
      • switches
      • stairway railings if present and lift buttons
      • store rooms
      • tills
      • trolleys and baskets – especial attention being given to touch points
      • shelving units
      • checkout counters
      • any equipment that must be shared between workers or members of the public

      Normal cleaning products should be sufficient to kill COVID-19. 

      Disposable cloths should be disposed of as appropriate, or if using reusables, these should be regularly washed at a high temperature.

      Cleaning of toilet facilities

      Toilet hygiene is extremely important to prevent spread of COVID-19.

      Designate at least one toilet as available only for staff use to minimise the risk of cross contamination.

      COVID-19 handwashing guidance posters should be clearly displayed in all toilet environments. 

      All toilet facilities provided by businesses for customers should be cleaned as guided twice a day and at any time required following 1 hourly checks. 

      Hand dryers should be disconnected: these spread water droplets and not everyone may have effectively washed their hands. Instead we recommend paper towels are provided. 

      COVID-19 toilet cleaning guidelines:

      • when cleaning toilet facilities, wear household rubber gloves that are reserved for this purpose and a disposable plastic apron 
      • disinfect by wiping down the toilet door handle, wash hand basin taps and toilet flush handle with a disposable cloth dampened with 0.1% bleach solution
      • make sure all areas touched by hands are cleaned as these are the areas most likely to be contaminated
      • clean the toilet bowl using a toilet brush and 0.1% bleach solution and rinse the brush by flushing the toilet
      • always flush the toilet with the seat and lid down to prevent splashing
      • use disposable cloths or paper roll and disposable mop heads, to clean all hard surfaces, floors, chairs, door handles and sanitary fittings
      • avoid creating splashes when cleaning
      • any cloths and mop heads used within the toilet area must be disposed of securely tied in waste bags and placed in a covered bin 

      Clothing and soft furnishings

      There is some evidence that the virus can remain active on fabric for a few days.

      • where soft furnishings are not necessary, you should consider their removal
      • if necessary soft furnishings have removable covers, these should be washed regularly
      • if employees are working with people from outside their household they should be encouraged to wash their clothes regularly

      Managing waste

      All waste should be stored securely and disposed of through your normal waste collections.

      Preparing to re-open premises

      Before re-opening, businesses and organisations should ensure that all necessary building checks and adjustments to the workplace have been undertaken prior to returning staff and visitors to the workplace.

      Legionella risk in water systems and HVAC maintenance

      All businesses reopening following lockdown must take the appropriate action – before they open - to ensure the safety of their water supplies and eliminate the risk of exposure to legionella bacteria. If your building has been closed or had reduced occupancy during the COVID-19 outbreak, water system stagnation may have occurred due to lack of use, increasing the risks of Legionnaire's disease. 

      The steps that you will need to take will depend on how you have been managing and controlling the risk during lockdown. If you have continued with a robust legionella management system in accordance with your written scheme throughout this period, then you may not need to take any further steps before reopening. Where no additional action has been taken or, you are concerned about whether the steps you have taken are adequate, it is essential that you do not put your water systems back into use without making it sure it is safe to do so.

      You should make sure you've taken all necessary steps to flush your hot and cold-water systems including:

      • all hot and cold-water taps
      • shower heads
      • other known deadheads as identified in your legionella plan

      If the premises has been closed you must risk assess how to undertake the flushing, with consideration given to testing.

      Air conditioning units are not considered to contribute to the spread of COVID-19 if operated correctly. Before using your unit ensure:

      • it is within maintenance requirements
      • there is sufficient external fresh air access to the system
      • you upgrade filters in air conditioning systems to the highest compatible with that model
      • control airflow directions in a building to move from clean to less clean
      • if using a fan, rather than HVAC system reduce rotation to minimise air flow

      All businesses are strongly advised to read and act on the advice published by the Health and Safety Inspectorate to ensure you are legionella ready when resuming your business activity.

      Other important adjustments to prepare your workplace

      In addition to all the other advice for business who are resuming activity at Level 2 of the safe exit framework, you should also consider the following:

      • stagger shift starts, end and break times to avoid crowding among staff
      • arrange shifts to maintain same staff working together where possible 
      • conduct a risk assessment covering the considerations detailed in this guidance and your business specific guidance
      • consider whether temporary policy changes around factors such as staff to staff contact, staff to customer contact, and contractor interaction are needed
      • list all areas of the business, from the warehouse to staff toilets, lifts, stair wells, locker rooms and stock rooms and how physical distancing and hygiene measures will be applied in all of them
      • identify all mitigation measures that are required to enable you to meet the conditions of re-opening
      • confirm how and when these mitigation measures will be implemented and who is responsible for overseeing them
      • if more cleaning is needed consider whether existing contractors can carry this out 
      • ensure that your sickness notification process and COVID-19 specific process has been made clear to all staff. Symptoms must be reported, decisions recorded and dated along with reference to government advice
      • consider how to keep staff up to date on all relevant government guidelines or store policy changes
      • ensure signage and relevant communications needed for customers is in place 
      • consider how frequently you will review your mitigation measures

      Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

      Signage

      You may wish to use Government of Jersey signage in your workplace to support the public health measure. Alternatively, you may wish to create your own. To help you in doing so, we have published print-friendly versions of our posters and have suggested some wording, should you wish to create your own.

      Physical distancing: To protect our customers and staff at this time, we are actively managing the number of customers who can come into our premises at any one time. Please make sure you stand 1 metre apart using the marked lines on the floor. When at the front wait behind the line until you're called forward. Thank you for your cooperation

      Sanitising: For the safety of everyone, please use this hand sanitiser before entering – do not enter if you are ill.

      Guidance for working safely in vehicles 

      This guidance applies to those travelling in vehicles with other people as part of their daily work. This can include but is not limited to taxi drivers, driving instructors, minibus drivers and those delivering services using heavy goods vehicles, vans or lorries.

      Work that involves travelling in vehicles with other people (such as driving tuition) can go ahead following the guidance provided here.

      Note that this guidance is in addition to the general guidance that applies to all businesses or organisations opening at the current time. The general guidance covers hygiene measures, looking after your staff, physical distancing and how you can safely take payments.

      If you have not already done so, you should carry out an assessment of the risks posed by COVID-19 in your workplace as soon as possible. You should also consider any advice that has been produced specifically for your sector, for example by trade associations or trades unions.  

      Physical distancing whilst working in vehicles

      It will not always be possible to maintain physical distancing inside vehicles. Many in-vehicle tasks need more than one person, for example heavy deliveries or refuse collection.

      If a large number of people need to travel to a location, consider multiple trips or vehicles where this is feasible to avoid larger groups of people sharing a vehicle and to allow as much space between people during the journey. 

      In larger organisations or businesses, reduce the number of people each person has contact with by using fixed teams (so each person works with only a few others).  

      Physical distancing applies to all parts of a business even if it cannot be maintained within vehicles, and therefore applies to depots or breakrooms and anywhere drivers or colleagues congregate outside of vehicles. 

      Hygiene and sanitising whilst working in vehicles 

      The following measures should be taken to reduce the risk of spread of COVID-19 when people must travel in the same vehicle: 

      • ensuring good ventilation by opening windows and keeping them open 
      • wearing cloth face masks by all passengers and drivers 
      • regular cleaning of all touch-points in vehicles such as door handles, seats and steering wheels, between use by different drivers and/or passengers 
      • further increasing the frequency of hand washing, especially before entering a vehicle that will be used by others
      • using screens or barriers to separate people from each other where possible, for example between taxi drivers and their passengers
      • using screens or barriers to separate people from each other where possible, for example between taxi drivers and their passengers. If you are considering the installation of a screen or any other fixture inside the vehicle, you must ensure that they are of an approved standard and fitted by a suitably qualified technician. It is important to ensure that screens designed to protect occupants from virus transmission do not prevent the safe operation of the vehicle, do not compromise internal safety systems (airbags/side curtains), or risk becoming damaged during an accident and causing injury to occupants. You are also reminded that this advice does preclude your existing statutory obligations of under the Road Traffic/Motor Traffic Legislation 

      Food and drink services

      Both indoor and outdoor seated food and drink services are permitted under Level 2 following in adherence with the following conditions and public health guidance set out below.  

      • a seated food and drinks service is permitted under usual licensing hours
      • group bookings from more than one household are now permitted but 1 metre physical distancing must be in place between different members of different households
      • strict physical distancing and hygiene measures are required for staff as well as customers

      Takeaways and food deliveries continue to be able to operate following the guidance provided.

      From Wednesday 1 July, certain food and drink venues including pubs and bars may open for a seated alcohol only service.

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      This guidance applies to any establishment that provides food and drink services in indoor or outdoor settings. 

      Principles for opening food and drinks services at level

      Make sure you also read

      This guidance should be read alongside the existing guidance on Food safety during a changing business model.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20 to 40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Physical distancing in food and drinks businesses

      You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing between everyone on your premises, staff, customers, passers-by and any other permitted visitors.

      Working in kitchens

      • physical distancing guidelines should be followed at every stage of food production - this includes supplier delivery, food preparation and service
      • many of our island's kitchens are small and in times of physical distancing this makes it difficult for usual staffing levels to be maintained
      • the maximum permitted levels of staffing within the kitchen is that which prevents staff from coming within the recommended physical distance of one another
      • you must assess how many members of staff can safely undertake their work, whilst meeting the requirements of physical distancing. This can include separation by area or by time. You must also assess how reduction in staffing may impact on food safety
      • restaurants may consider using areas previously used as customer areas for certain aspects of food preparation
      • if you choose to use another kitchen at home or elsewhere you should contact Environmental Health before doing so email Environmental health

      Spacing of tables

      • a reservation-only service is strongly encouraged so that a table plan can be arranged and so that the arrival time of customers can be staggered
      • confirm that none of their group have Covid-19 symptoms
      • set tables and chairs to facilitate physical distancing of at least 1 metre between different households
      • consider what is the largest group booking you can safely accommodate in your premises
      • spacing tables and chairs with regard to the potential proximity of passers-by
      • physical distancing of queueing will be required if a large number of individuals arrive at a particular time
      • as a rule of thumb, the establishment should avoid any more than approximately 40 to 50 covers at a time (with physical distancing in place)
      • prevent customers from sitting at tables until they have been cleared and sanitised
      • menus that are shared between different customers are strongly discouraged. Consider using a display board or technology such as smartphone apps and QR codes to enable customers to view menus and to order meals on-line and to make contactless payment

      Queuing and circulation

      • prepare to minimise and control customers queuing for services or using toilet facilities 
      • sufficient circulation space for staff and customers to allow adequate physical distancing
      • employing a 'one-way' system for staff entering and leaving premises and for customers approaching and leaving the alfresco area or food outlet. This should include clearly marked safe queuing distances

      Hygiene and sanitising in food and drinks services

      Do not prepare and handle food if you're feeling unwell or if you have any symptoms of COVID-19.

      Wash your hands, maintain personal hygiene

      This is more important than ever, especially for anyone working to prepare meals for the public. Wash your hands thoroughly and regularly and maintain good personal hygiene.

      Ensure hand-washing facilities have a constant supply of warm running water, soap and single use paper towel at all times.

      Hands should be washed:

      • on arrival at work
      • on entering any service area
      • before handling any food
      • after touching anything that customers, staff or delivery drivers may have contaminated
      • after touching hand contact surfaces such as handrails, door handles, light switches
      • always after using the toilet or going into the toilet areas
      • after touching your face, sneezing or coughing
      • in between all tasks
      • after smoking
      • after handling and opening packaging, money, receipts, and cleaning supplies
      • after removing gloves and aprons and before putting on new ones
      • any time your hands are contaminated
      • after touching rubbish
      • regularly

      'Self-service' and buffets

      Some establishments provide service through salad bars and breakfast bars, hot hold and cold pastry areas and similar.

      We recommend these areas are suspended during the outbreak due to the following factors:

      • hand contact with produce / tongs increases the risk of cross contamination
      • the food is more prone to being coughed or sneezed on
      • the recommended 1m separation becomes increasingly difficult to manage due to increased customer time at these areas

      Sharing platters / bread

      We encourage you to not provide shared bread bowls or sharing platters.

      If you typically deliver food as a sharing experience, for example tapas, nachos and similar you should consider alternative ways of delivering this food to discourage this sharing.

      Bring your own

      Cancel 'bring your own' options such as coffee mugs and food containers. Those businesses that depend on this style of service must consider short term alternatives.

      Preparing to resume food and drinks services at level 2

      Each business will need to translate this guidance into the specific actions it needs to take, depending on the nature of their business, including the size and type of business, how it is organised, operated, managed and regulated.  

      To help you decide which actions to take, you need to carry out an appropriate COVID-19 risk assessment, just as you would for other health and safety related hazards.  

      If you have been closed during Stage 3 and 4 of lockdown or are adapting the services you offer, you will need to get ready for service.

      Ensure you have the right permission:

      • inform Environmental Health that you intend to reopen and / or begin serving sit down customers
      • complete a Places of Refreshment application if required
      • if you are the owner or manager of a drinks venue and are planning to provide meals, you need to let Environmental Health know, by updating a food registration form, that you will be using your kitchen to prepare meals
      • you may require a Refreshments Licence from the Trading Standards section of Growth, Housing and Environment and, approval from the local Parish for new or expanded facilities on Parish owned land, including pavements. In other areas, consent from the land-owner will be required

      Check stocks and equipment:

      • you may need to order food with your suppliers early as they will have reduced their levels of fresh produce
      • check all of your stock and discard any out of date food
      • if possible, where equipment was left running (refrigeration / freezers, electronic fly killers) begin checking these are working properly.  Remember to keep records to demonstrate that the units have been working efficiently
      • if equipment was switched off you will need to ensure they are working correctly, and refrigerators and freezers are at operating temperature before used for stock storage
      • give yourself and your supplier sufficient time to provide appropriate cleaning materials before reopening. Hand dryers are not recommended during the outbreak, which requires alternative drying facilities. We recommend disposable paper towels

      Thoroughly clean the premises:

      • give everywhere a deep clean and undertake any repairs and decorating
      • clean and disinfect all equipment and preparation surfaces
      • make sure that your premises are pest free and pest proofed 
      • make sure all doors and windows (internal and external) are closed to help prevent fire and continue to manage pest control
      • inform your waste collector you have restarted trading and ensure that they have access to the external bins
      • ensure your staff are refreshed in food hygiene training. If you've been closed, you will need to ensure all staff are refreshed in hygiene and food safety principles
      • staff will need to understand how to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19

      Indoor seated food services

      Consider the following:

      • the risk of transmission of the virus is greater indoors
      • perspex barriers above seated head height between tables, where appropriate, may reduce the distancing required between household groups
      • delivery and removal of food and drink to diners should, where possible, be undertaken in a way that supports physical distancing
      • existing examples are to use a central table for customers to collect their order, or a dedicated drop off table at the end of the household's table
      • where this cannot be achieved the waiter role should be risk assessed to ensure protection from respiratory droplets
      • allow a minimum of 20 minutes after a table has been vacated to allow water droplets to land on surfaces before these are appropriately cleaned and sanitised
      • customers are not currently allowed to wait at a bar for their table to be ready - if their table isn't ready the situation should be explained, and the household encouraged to return to the premises within a prescribed time

      Outdoor seated food services

      The establishment of an alfresco dining area related, and adjacent, to an existing business selling hot or cold meals and drink for consumption on or off the premises, will be permitted.  Consider the following:

      Awnings and weather screens

      • temporary weather screens, awnings and outdoor heaters will be permitted where they are not physically attached to the building or road / pavement surface
      • where a new awning is erected businesses must consider the impact on air flow, to allow at least 50% ventilation to aid air flow around external diners
      • when new awnings are erected the final structure should not be substantially enclosed and it should not constitute more than a roof and one side
      • the alfresco area and any associated screens must not detract from the safe and free flow of traffic and pedestrians

      Building alterations

      • non-structural internal alterations to a building will be permitted where required to make access to kitchens, toilets and washing facilities easier and safer for staff and / or customers. For example, the placement of partition screens to allow physical distancing and to encourage a one-way flow of people to and from the facilities
      • non-structural external alterations to a building may be permitted where these are of a temporary and reversible nature
      • alterations will not be permitted in or on Listed Buildings without the necessary planning permission and, in all cases, without approval under the relevant Building Bye-Laws
      • please contact the Planning and Building division of the Department of Growth, Housing and Environment for further information regarding any proposed building alterations, prior to works commencing

      Food vans, trailers and carts

      The siting of a moveable structure, whether motorised or not, for the sale of hot or cold food and beverages will be permitted. This guidance does not apply to such structures within a domestic curtilage. Consider the following:

      • rope barriers or similar temporary control measures will be allowed to encourage safe and orderly queuing and to allow a safe flow of customers to and from the outlet 
      • a number of tables and chairs will be permitted to allow customers to enjoy their food and these should be placed to ensure the required physical distancing from each other 
      • the moveable structure and any associated measures must not detract from the safe and free flow of traffic and pedestrians
      • the times of operation must be agreed with the Department of Growth, Housing and Environment (Environmental Health) prior to the outlet opening for business

      Takeaways and food deliveries

      Only takeaway services whose kitchen preparation space allows for physical distancing should operate. Consider the following:

      • any take away food business that chooses to open must put measures in place to ensure that physical distancing is maintained between their workforce and in any interaction with customers
      • any shop, café, restaurant or bar that ordinarily serves meals or drink will be permitted to serve hot or cold meals and beverages for consumption off the premises
      • service could take place through an existing window or door opening without customers having to enter the premises
      • rope barriers or similar temporary control measures will be allowed to encourage safe and orderly queuing and to allow a safe flow of customers to and from the outlet 
      • where distanced queuing is not practicable, time distancing can be considered; for example, a collection area for beach kiosks where food is placed and the customer name / number called out before the server steps away
      • additional bins could be used for customers to deposit their meal packaging into in order to reduce staff time clearing tables
      • any associated control measures must not detract from the safe and free flow of traffic and pedestrians

      Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

      Drinks only venues partnering with a food business

      In Level 2 drinks only venues may wish to work with food providers in order to open to the public.  They can only do so if they are able to follow the guidance for food and drinks services, which includes, for example, ensuring that physical distancing is maintained between households.

      Due to the change in business model you are legally required to tell Environmental Health you will be serving food. We request that you include the name of the business you are partnering with. You may email this information to environmentalhealth@gov.je rather than complete a new food registration form. If you choose to continue this arrangement post COVID-19 Safe Exit we will request you update your food registration form.

      The partnership is an independent venture between the organisations, but you should consider the following:

      • review the Eat Safe rating of the business you wish to partner with to know their standards for food hygiene
      • assess how the food will be delivered to your business if the partner doesn't traditionally provide takeaway
      • the customer should not order food directly with the food business, this must be done through the drinks venue
      • consider how payment will be made from one venue to the next
      • follow government guidelines for the safe provision of food, and guidelines for all food and drinks services at this time 

      A meal is the equivalent of at least the main course of a restaurant menu or takeaway main course. Sandwiches, food usually offered as a side dish and bar snacks are not considered a meal.

      You must document your procedures and demonstrate how you maintain food safety within your premises once the delivery has been provided.

      If you wish to provide alcohol to be consumed off premises you require a 6th category licence in addition to your existing licence.

      Alcohol service for licenced premises

      This guidance is for businesses who hold liquor licences granted under the Licensing (Jersey) Law 1974. From the Wednesday 1 July, holders of the following categories may provide a seated alcohol only service:   

      (a)first category, "Taverner's Licence"

      (b)second category, "Residential Licence"

      (c)third category, "Restaurant Licence"

      (d)fourth category, "Comprehensive Licence"

      (e)fifth category, "Club Licence"

      Businesses holding a seventh category (b) "designated nightclub" and / or (c) "any other place of entertainment" and those who can only provide a standing only service must remain closed.   

      Where a holder of a seventh category licence also holds any other category licence they may trade under those categories, but not under the seventh category, with the exemption of seventh (a) cinemas and theatres. ;

      Compliance spot checks will take place to ensure businesses and organisations are complying with these requirements.  

      This guidance is in addition to the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19. This guidance covers risk assessments, general hygiene, looking after your staff and physical distancing amongst other things.

      Businesses providing a food service can continue to follow the existing guidance for food and drink services.   

      Preparing to open 

      Ensure you have the right permission; you may require approval from the local Parish or the Licensing Assembly for new or expanded facilities on Parish owned land, including pavements. In other areas, consent from the land-owner will be required 

      Check stocks and equipment:  

      • check all of your stock and discard any out of date drinks  
      • if possible, where equipment was left running (refrigeration / freezers, electronic fly killers) begin checking these are working properly.  Remember to keep records to demonstrate that the units have been working efficiently  
      • if equipment was switched off you will need to ensure they are working correctly, and refrigerators and freezers are at operating temperature before used for stock storage  
      • give yourself and your supplier sufficient time to provide appropriate cleaning materials before reopening. Hand dryers are not recommended during the outbreak, which requires alternative drying facilities. We recommend disposable paper towels  

      Thoroughly clean the premises: 

      • give everywhere a deep clean and undertake any repairs and decorating  
      • clean and disinfect all equipment and preparation surfaces  
      • make sure that your premises are pest free and pest proofed   
      • make sure all doors and windows (internal and external) are closed to help prevent fire and continue to manage pest control  
      • inform your waste collector you have restarted trading and ensure that they have access to the external bins  
      • ensure your staff are refreshed in food hygiene training. If you've been closed, you will need to ensure all staff are refreshed in hygiene and food safety principles 
      • staff will need to understand how to reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19  

      Additional guidance on food and drink service should be read alongside this guidance.   

      Operational considerations - implementing a seated service  

      For many businesses, there will be a number of adjustments required to your premises, the way that you work and the way you deliver drinks services in a seated service format.  

      You should have a detailed plan in place to support physical distancing between everyone on your premises including staff, customers and any other visitors wherever possible. This includes customer areas and staff work and recreation areas.  

      You should apply updated COVID-19 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), considering:  

      Zoned layout  

      A seated table service should be organised into zones wherever possible, this may include separate bar areas and al fresco areas on your premises. This will help reduce the risk of transmission of COVID-19 across the premises for staff and for customers who may be sitting for prolonged periods of time in close proximity. It will also help to implement contact tracing if needed. Further details on contact tracing is below.  

      Reservations  

      Your business may already take reservations for bookings. For walk-in customers, you should consider having a 'table allocation' system in place for groups as your numbers will not be predictable; you may consider having this at the entry point to manage walk ins and to allocate a table effectively, ensuring physical distancing.  

      Managing entry  

      Upon arrival, you should ask customers to share their contact details, explaining why you are doing so and, with permission, collect and store them appropriately (see data collection guidelines below). You should also confirm that customers do not have COVID-19 symptoms before seating them; this can be done via a simple question or declaration.  

      If these new requirements might result in queues forming outside the business, you should consider how to manage queuing safely, maintaining both safe distancing and public order.   

      Managing tables  

      • seated service at the bar itself are strongly discouraged owing to the difficulty in maintaining safe physical distance.  
      • aim to allow a minimum of 20 minutes after a table has been vacated to allow water droplets to land on surfaces before these are appropriately cleaned and sanitised.  
      • set tables and chairs to facilitate physical distancing of at least 1 metre between customers when seated at tables   
      • consider what is the largest table you can safely accommodate in your premises  
      • space tables and chairs with regard to the potential proximity of passers-by  
      • avoid any more than approximately 40 to 50 covers at a time (with physical distancing in place)  
      • prevent customers from sitting at tables until they have been cleared and sanitised  
      • menus that are shared between different customers are strongly discouraged. Consider using a display board, or technology such as smartphone apps and QR codes to enable customers to view menus and to order meals on-line and to make contactless payment  
      • ordering at the bar is strongly discouraged because of the difficulty in maintaining physical distancing and the increased risk of transmission

      The delivery and removal of drinks to customers should, where possible, be undertaken in a way that supports physical distancing.  For example, orders could be taken by a staff member at the table and then collected by them and delivered to customers who remain at the table. 

      Where this cannot be achieved, consider mitigation measures such as using a central table for customers to collect their order, or a dedicated drop off table at the end of the table.  

      Bar etiquette of returning empty glasses should be discouraged.  

      Queuing and circulation  

      Prepare to minimise and control customers queuing for services, or using toilet facilities.   

      Allow sufficient circulation space for staff and customers to allow adequate physical distancing, for example employing a 'one-way' system for staff entering and leaving premises and for customers approaching and leaving. This might include clearly marked safe queuing distances. 

      As appropriate, businesses should also plan how to ensure customers can exit the premises in a safe and orderly way, maintaining at least 1 metre distance from others.  

      Music 

      Venues are advised to only play low volume ambient background music on their premises to avoid people leaning into one other when talking; shouting and singing along which increases the very high risk of spreading droplets. In Level 2, across all business, social and community contexts, singing, in addition to woodwind and brass music, is strongly discouraged both outdoors and indoors because of the very high risk of dispersing droplets and therefore of spreading infection.   

      Play areas

      Indoor play areas must remain closed at this time; this guidance will be reviewed as we move through Level 1.  

      Collecting contact information  

      This  guidance is to help support businesses to collect customer information for the purposes of contact tracing. The Jersey Office of the Information Commissioner (JOIC) has published a checklist for businesses called Track & Trace Personal Information which sets out how businesses can navigate their legal responsibilities in collecting personal data to assist Government with track and trace of COVID-19.  

      It is important that you read the checklists whether or not you already collect information from customers for other business purposes.

      Why are we asking for contact detail collection?

      As we move through the Safe Exit Framework contact tracing has an increasingly important role to play in Jersey's COVID-19 strategy and to help keep each other safe.

      Following the relaxation of measures, the number of close contact social interactions that individuals have will increase – close contact is direct or less than 2 metres for more than 15 minutes. it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person.

      Contact tracing allows us to identify those that are at the highest risk of having caught the virus from a person who has been confirmed as having COVID-19 through a positive PCR test. The contact tracing process only starts when there has been a confirmed case of COVID-19 established through a positive PCR test.

      The collection of simple contact information from customers allows the contact tracing team to help protect others who have been in close contact with someone who is a confirmed case of COVID-19 through the track and trace process.

      Collecting information for the purpose of contact tracing

      Upon arrival, you should ask customers to share their contact details, explaining why you are doing so and providing them with the information required by the Data Protection (Jersey) Law. This can be in the form of an information sheet or written notice or it can be verbal. See the guidance published by the JOIC if you are not sure how to do this.

      You should also ask customers for their consent to you collecting their information and to you sharing it with the Government. Again, please refer to the guidance published by the JOIC for details on how to collect appropriate consent.

      If the customer consents, you should ask them to provide the following information that is needed by the contact tracing team:

      • Full Name
      • Mobile contact number
      • Date and time of arrival

      Confirming consent is given
      No further information is needed for track and trace, so please do not collect or provide us with any further details. 

      Looking after customer information

      • You may already be collecting data for other purposes such as marketing and it is important that the data collected for track and trace purposes is not merged with this data or used for any other purpose than to provide it to the Government when requested.  You should not, for example, ask customers if they will also consent to the data being provided to be used for marketing communications, as this may make individuals reluctant to provide their contact details for track and trace purposes. . Further understanding of this is available from the JOIC.
      • You cannot deny a patron entry or service if they refuse to consent to the collection of their information.
      • Staff members must be briefed that the customer information they are collecting is confidential and for the purposes of contact tracing only.
      • Customer information you collect, on paper or electronically, should be kept for 21 days. After this period, you must ensure it is securely destroyed. A daily procedure designated to an appropriate staff member may help you with this.
      • The data collected must be kept securely and should not be accessible to anyone who doesn't have a reason associated with contact tracing to see it. This means that each customer should complete a separate form or provide their details in a manner that would not allow others to see them. For example, customers should not be asked to add their details to a list that contains the personal data of customers who had previously provided their information earlier in the day, and completed forms should not be left unsecured. Each person's personal data must be kept confidential. 
      • You may wish to put an information sheet together for customers to allow them to understand how their customer information will be used to help protect them and others if contact tracing is required including:
        • Customer information collected will not be used for any other purposes than contact tracing by the Government of Jersey, in the event of a positive test for Covid-19. It will not be used for other purposes such as marketing.
        • Information requested by the contact tracing team will only be used for the purposes of contact tracing. If requested, it will be kept securely on Government of Jersey systems and securely destroyed when no longer needed.
        • Contact tracers will not reveal the identity of the person who has tested positive without their consent

      Retail

      Since 18 May all shops have been permitted to open following the public health guidance set out here.

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope  

      This guidance applies to all shops or premises selling goods to the public.

      Principles for opening retail at level 2 



      Make sure you also read

      All shops selling food should also follow the guidance for the food and drink sector.

      The following guidance should also be adhered to as relevant, wellbeing, close personal contact, allied health

      Physical distancing in the retail sector

      You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing of 1 metre between everyone on your premises including staff, customers and any other permitted visitors.

      Measures to do this will depend on your business operations but might include:

      • guide customers with floor markings at particular points where they may congregate, such as check-out queues, toilet queues or queues outside the business premises if these are anticipated
      • it will be for individual retailers to decide how they manage and organise space outside of their premises between themselves as required
      • assess how many members of staff can safely undertake their work, whilst maintaining a distance of 1 metre between each other, and consider separation of staff by area or by time
      • assess how a reduction in staffing, if needed, may impact on the ability to open
      • consider allocating a member of staff to supervise entrances to regulate how many customers can enter during busy periods
      • businesses may choose to create one-way systems in shops, shut alternate check outs, or implement other appropriate measures
      • consider suspending services which require direct interaction with customers such as providing make up advice, personal shopping or assistance in carrying large purchases
      • if retailers are continuing to provide these services they should provide suitable protection and advice to staff on how to conduct these activities safely
      • you may want to consider short-term policy changes such as allowing extensions for returns for example from 30 to 60 days
      • remove or limit customer seating in store. If seating is provided, space out appropriately to enable physical distancing
      • all physical distancing and hygiene measures must apply to all elements of the retail premises and business operation, including for example stock rooms, staff areas and locker rooms and deliver points

      Hygiene and sanitising in the retail sector

      Staff and customers of the retail sector can be protected from the risk of COVID-19 spread by the following the additional measures:

      • put in place physical barriers such as perspex screens or an equivalent at check-out points
      • provide staff with sufficient supplies of rubber disposable gloves which should be changed every 1-3 hours (depending on the need to physically handle items that customers may have touched such as shared-surfaces and stock)
      • offer staff alternative tasks if concerns are raised
      • remind staff not to share items for example, pens or any other items
      • if disposable gloves, visors or cloth masks are supplied to staff ensure colleagues are reminded to replace or clean them regularly during use, and before and after each use

      Fitting rooms

      Due to the ongoing low number of COVID-19 cases in Jersey, fitting rooms in shops can now open if they are able to strictly adhere to the public health guidance given below:

      Retailers should:

      • ensure that access to fitting rooms is supervised by a member of staff
      • suspend fitting assistance to ensure that contact between customers and staff is limited
      • ensure that chairs and other furniture are removed from the fitting room to minimise touch points and facilitate cleaning - hooks can be provided to hang clothes
      • ensure that all surfaces in the fitting room are wiped clean with an appropriate disinfectant between use by different customers
      • ensure that a signs is clearly displayed asking customers with symptoms to refrain from trying on clothes
      • demonstrate that they have controls in place to ensure that the fitting room has been cleaned prior to their use and that this is communicated to customers (for example displaying a sign saying 'Fitting room clean - available for use')
      • demonstrate that they have controls in place to ensure that the fitting room remains after closed after use until it has been cleaned and that this is communicated to customers (for example displaying a sign saying 'Fitting room awaiting cleaning – not available for use'
      • provide hand sanitiser (with 60-70% alcohol content) and ensure that customers must use it before entering the fitting room and after leaving the fitting room
      • ensure that all items of clothing that a customer has taken into the fitting room are date and time labelled and stored for 72 hours before being put back on display

      All product testers should be removed from stores, such as makeup or other cosmetics, due to the added risk of viral spread these pose.

      Returns

      Where businesses are accepting returned items, they should consider isolating these items for a period of at least 72 hours before putting them back out on display.

      Gloves should also be worn as added protection for staff when handling returns.

      Unstaffed side of the road vegetable stalls

      Only one customer should approach a stall at a time ensuring they are 1 metre from any other customer or person serving from the stall. Where customers are arriving by car they should be encouraged to queue safely. Money should be left directly in the honesty box. If physical distancing is not possible, then they must not open the stall.

      Supermarkets

      In addition to the guidance to all retailers supermarkets should consider removing self-serve guns (if applicable) or providing suitable protection (gloves) or cleaning (alcohol wipes) of the guns when they are returned.

      Taxi services

      Taxi drivers must maintain a strict regime of hand hygiene and disinfecting of key touch points within the taxi. It is also advisable that payment is contactless, not cash, to minimise the risk of infection.

      People showing symptoms, or who are required to isolate, must not use taxis or public transport. Taxi firms should enquire about this before accepting any fare.

      Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

      Working indoors (offices, workshops, warehouses, other indoor business)

      Many indoor businesses will have been able to resume working at the workplace from the 20th May, at Level 3 of the Safe Exit Framework. This was in the event that it was essential to the business functioning, where employees could not work from home, and where it was otherwise considered safe to do so, following a risk assessment.

      Now we have reached Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework, indoor businesses such as offices, warehouses, manufacturing and workshops are able to return more employees to the workplace, beyond what may be otherwise considered essential. However, at this stage of the pandemic, businesses are still strongly advised to continue to allow working from home as the default operating model, where it is possible to do so.

      For small or other indoor businesses not covered by sector specific advice published by Government, you should follow the principles for opening indoor business at Level 2 and adapt a plan that is suited to your premises and business activities (such as private tutoring, music lessons and art studios).

      Singing, woodwind and brass is strongly discouraged both outdoors and indoors because of the very high risk of dispersal of droplets and therefore spreading infection.

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope  

      This guidance applies to indoor workplaces such as offices, warehouses, manufacturing workshops and other indoor businesses.

      In the case of indoor food and drink, retail, sport and fitness, community buildings, leisure business activities, places of worship, wellbeing, cosmetic and beauty services and other allied health services, other guidance also applies and should be followed. 

      Principles for opening indoor business



      Make sure you also read

      Every business or organisation opening during the COVID-19 pandemic should plan in advance how they are going to reduce the risk of spreading the virus during the course of operating. A risk assessment must be undertaken and appropriate measures put in place before opening to reduce and manage the risk of coronavirus transmission. Crucially, this means that the number of people working within the building must be able to comfortably maintain physical distancing at all times and there must be adequate welfare and hygiene provisions made available. In some cases, this will mean that the number of employees able to return to the workplace will remain considerably limited. If you have already undertaken a risk assessment for Level 3, this needs to be updated at Level 2 if you are intending to increase staff numbers and activity at this stage. Any new or additional measures should be implemented prior to the increased activity resuming.

      In the cases where a business is within a building occupied by others, an additional risk assessment that covers the communal areas shared with people outside of your organisation will need to be developed.

      The plan for communal areas should have regard to this Public Health guidance and be developed in collaboration with the other occupants of the building and those with authorisation for the management of the areas (such as facilities management and landlords), depending on the specific ownership and management structure of the premises.

      A record of the risk assessment and plan should be available for inspection by the relevant authorities, including the Health and Safety Inspectorate, upon request.

      When you open, you may wish to display a 'we are workplace ready' poster to demonstrate that you have you have followed the indoor workplace guidelines.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      In line with the general guidance on gatherings and events, businesses and organisations are also strongly advised to keep meetings and team events small, and online where possible. If a physical event is required, they should be planned and structured to maintain safe distancing, and only involve up to a maximum of 40 people.

      Office-based working

      You must ensure that you have read the principles for opening indoor business at Level 2 and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance.

      Risk assessments must be undertaken in a way that is bespoke to your office environment and the way that your business operates.

      In addition to the general guidance for business, measures to consider to support effective hygiene and social distancing in an office environment might include:

      • limit and control the number of staff in the building at any one time, which may include staggering arrival, departure and break times or shift patterns. At Level 2, you should continue to support and encourage employees to work from home, where this is possible 
      • use markings, introducing one-way flows (where possible) and introducing policies for movement etiquette at entry and exit points and throughout the building
      • ensure access to adequate handwashing facilities (i.e. liquid soap, water and disposable hand towels) and hand sanitiser (with 60-70% alcohol content) prominently available throughout the building
      • restrict access to areas such as small meeting rooms, and limit the number of people in confined spaces such as kitchens, toilets, lifts and changing rooms (such as a 'one in, one out' policy) 
      • review and adapt workstations and other work areas to ensure reasonably practicable steps have been undertaken to maintain a minimum space of 1 metre. This may involve identifying desks and seating areas that should not be occupied and restricting access to them. It may also be appropriate to use tape floor markings to ensure spacing can be clearly maintained
      • workstations should be assigned to an individual for the duration of their working shift. If workstations need to be shared with those working a different shift pattern, each workstation should be kept to a minimum number of people and cleaned between users
      • identify and implement ways you can support staff travelling to work using their own means (walk, cycle or car) to reduce the need to travel by public transport
      • ensure that cleaning contracts and enhanced procedures have been put in place in preparation for the return to office working. This may include ensuring that suitable cleaning products are available for office staff to use outside of the regular cleaning times (such as to disinfect workstations and printers in between uses)

      Further ideas and advice on working safely in offices on gov.uk

      Warehouse and workshop-based businesses

      You must ensure that you have read the principles for opening indoor business at Level 2 and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance.

      A risk assessment addressing the control of Covid-19 transmission must be undertaken in the exactly the same way as you will have done for all of the other significant hazards and risks associated with your working activities.

      It is especially important to make sure that any additional measures you need to introduce to manage the risks of Covid-19 are properly resourced and do not comprise the other every day risks you need to manage.

      Experience shows that in many high-risk workplaces, such as warehouses, motor vehicle repair shops, joineries and other workshop-based businesses, it may be necessary to provide additional resource, whether in-house or through external contractors, to help provide adequate supervision and to implement enhanced hygiene and physical distancing procedures whilst also maintaining control over your typical high risk activities.

      In addition to the general guidance for business, measures to consider in order to support effective hygiene and physical distancing in a warehouse or workshop environment might include:

      • consider who needs to be on site, for example, office or admin staff may be able to work from home. Where it is possible for staff to work from home, they should continue to do so. Plan the work to minimise the number of people needed to be on the premises at anyone time to operate safely and effectively  
      • stagger arrival and departure times at work to reduce crowding into and out of the workplace, particularly if you only have one entry point
      • use markings and one-way flow at entry and exit points and throughout the workplace
      • reduce movement by discouraging non-essential trips within the workplace and restricting access to areas such as small meeting rooms, and limiting the number of people in confined spaces such as kitchens, toilets and changing rooms (such as a 'one in, one out' policy)
      • review workplace layouts and work processes, including position of machinery and storage of materials etc., to ensure that all reasonably practicable steps have been undertaken to ensure that people are able to work whilst maintaining a minimum of 1 metre physical distance
      • ensure access to adequate handwashing facilities (i.e. liquid soap, water and disposable hand towels) and hand sanitiser (with minimum 60-70% alcohol content) prominently available throughout the workplace
      • encourage increased handwashing, and where necessary, introduce additional handwashing facilities, for people handling equipment, goods and merchandise. Where this not readily available, provide appropriate hand sanitiser (with 60-70% alcohol content)     
      • wherever possible, making sure portable tools are not shared between different people. Where this cannot be avoided, carefully consider what controls and cleaning procedures are required, for example wearing of gloves which are disposed of after each use 
      • consider cleaning procedures required when plant, machinery or tools must be used by more than one person, for example fork lift trucks, vehicle lifts, woodworking machinery, pallet trucks etc.
      • identify areas where people may have to pass things to each other, for example, drawings, spare parts, raw materials etc. and put in place all reasonably practicable measures to remove direct contact and ensure 1 metre physical distancing, such as through the use of drop off points or transfer zones
      • put in place all reasonably practicable procedures to minimise person-to-person contact during deliveries to customers or sites 
      • review pick-up and drop-off collection points, procedures, signage and markings
      • consider methods to reduce frequency of deliveries, for example by ordering larger quantities less often
      • wherever possible, use mechanical means to load and off-load deliveries. Where maintaining physical distance will not be possible during deliveries, you should consider whether or not the activity/delivery should go ahead. If the activity is essential, try to use the same pairs of people to carry the work if 1 metre distancing can't be maintained and consider other protective measures such as cloth masks
      • identify and implement ways you can support staff travelling to work using their own means (walk, cycle or car) to reduce the need to travel by public transport
      • when you are already using PPE and/or RPE in your work activity to protect against non-COVID-19 risks, you should continue to do so. It is not necessary to wear extra PPE/ RPE as a precautionary measure

      For making or receiving deliveries, follow guidance for Deliveries

      Further ideas and advice on preparing factory, plant and warehouse environments can be found at gov.uk

      Workplace compliance poster

      Workplace hygiene poster

      Lift usage poster

      Meeting room poster

      Cleaning services

      In level 2 of Safe Exit all cleaning domestic and workplace cleaning businesses can resume following the general guidance for all businesses as well as the guidance for indoor work and the guidance for working in people's homes.

      Managers of cleaning services should ensure all employees are aware of infection control procedures, including strict hand hygiene protocols. Strict waste disposal guidance should be in place to reduce the risk of infection.

      Cleaning offices and areas where there are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19

      Once symptomatic, all surfaces that the person has come into contact with must be cleaned including:

      • all surfaces and objects which are visibly contaminated with body fluids
      • all potentially contaminated high-contact areas such as toilets, door handles, telephones

      Public areas where someone with the infection has passed through and spent minimal time in (such as corridors) but which are not visibly contaminated with body fluids do not need to be specially cleaned and disinfected.

      If a person becomes ill in a shared space, it should be cleaned using disposable cloths and household detergents, according to current recommended workplace legislation and practice.

      Working in people's homes

      As part of Level 2, businesses are now allowed to carry out work in customers' homes if the following public health guidance is adhered to.

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      It covers all business activity that involves going in to a private occupied residence such as cleaners, cooks, surveyors, estate agents, internal building maintenance (including repair, renovation and home improvement), deliveries, home visits for personal appointments (such as hairdressing, health practitioners etc). This is not an exhaustive list.

      Principles for working in people's homes



      Make sure you also read

      Construction work is now allowed to take place in occupied residences.  All such work should adhere to the guidance for working safely in people's homes.  

      Before scheduling the work, you should have a conversation with the occupant(s) of the home to ensure that you are both comfortable with the work taking place. This includes contacting the tenant should the work have been requested by a landlord. If either party is not comfortable, then the work should not take place. You should be particularly mindful of anyone in the household who may be continuing to shield due to vulnerabilities (except where the organisation is a private healthcare provider giving necessary care to the individual).

      Wherever possible, appropriate physical distance should be maintained between the householders and those attending the household. Where the activity is not possible without direct contact, the guidance for working in close personal contact must be followed.

      It is likely that nannies and childminders will not be able to maintain the physical distance with the children in their care and therefore the specific guidance for nannies and childminders should be followed.

      Sector specific guidance for working in people's homes

      You must ensure that you have read the principles for working in people's homes at Level 2 and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19, in addition to this sector specific guidance.

      Work within occupied households will not be permitted where:

      • either those attending the household or anyone resident in the house are following the isolation advice due to having COVID-19, displaying symptoms of COVID-19 or have been told to isolate due to close contact with a positive case or return from travel.

      The exception to this is for emergency or essential repairs which should strictly follow the specific guidance for these circumstances.

      When working in a household where somebody is higer risk, prior arrangements should be made to avoid any face-to-face contact, for example, when answering the door. You should be particularly strict about handwashing, coughing and sneezing hygiene, such as covering your nose and mouth and disposing of single-use tissues.

      Preparing to resume working in people's homes

      Each business will need to translate this guidance into the specific actions it needs to take, depending on the nature of their business, including the size and type of business, how it is organised, operated, managed and regulated.

      To help you decide which actions to take, you need to carry out an appropriate COVID-19 risk assessment, just as you would for other health and safety related hazards.

      Prior to starting work in an occupied private residence

      Consider the following:

      • find digital or remote alternatives to physical, in-home work where possible such as video or phone consultations and only attend the property where necessary
      • confirm with the customer that no one within the residence has tested COVID-19 positive and if so find out when and establish if their isolation period has ended
      • confirm with the customer that no one within the residence is showing any symptoms of COVID-19 or are isolating for any other reason
      • ask the customer if anyone in the residence is shielding because they are vulnerable and discuss how you will approach this
      • reconfirm the health status of residents each day that work will be undertaken
      • ensure that if there is a landlord / tenant situation, that the landlord provides confirmation of the health status of the tenants or confirm this directly with the residents
      • discuss working environment and practices with householders and clients in advance to confirm how the work will be carried out
      • discuss the requirement for residents to clean items and / or the space where work is being undertaken prior to your arrival
      • discuss with households how safety requirements will be managed each day
      • consider how staff will travel to the property
      • maintain a log of the workers entering the property, ensuring that sub-contractors understand your COVID-19 procedures on site and keep residents informed
      • hold meetings outdoors or in well-ventilated rooms whenever possible
      • ask that households leave all internal doors open to minimise contact with door handles
      • ask households to open all windows to increase ventilation through the property where possible / comfortable

      Physical distancing while working in people's homes

      In addition to the general business guidance on physical distancing, you should maintain physical distancing wherever possible while performing work in the home.

      Consider the following:

      • wherever possible ensure the resident is absent from the property or stays in a separate room whilst work is being undertaken
      • use signage in the home to indicate where and when work is being undertaken
      • some in-home services will not always be able to maintain physical distance from customers, in such instances additional precautions should be taken (see Allied Health professionals guidance)
      • identify busy areas across the household where people travel to, from or through. For example, stairs and corridors, and minimise movement within these areas
      • limit the number of workers within a confined space to maintain social distancing
      • use a fixed pairing system if people must work in close proximity, for example, during 2 person assembly or maintenance

      Hygiene and sanitising while working in people's homes

      In addition to the guidance on hygiene and cleaning provided to all business those working in private residence, you should also consider the following:

      Before work commences in the property the householder should:

      • clean the areas of the property and the items that the worker is likely to come into contact with (for example, the washing machine that is to be repaired), with particular focus being given to the toilet and bathroom areas and frequent touch points such as door handles and light switches

      When work commences in the property the service provider should:

      • agree with the householder which bathroom / sink they can use while in the property, if possible this should be a different room than the householder uses
      • if handwashing facilities are not accessible, they should carry hand sanitiser
      • all workers should wash hands or use sanitiser on arrival and before leaving the property and regularly throughout the time spent working in the property
      • workers should frequently clean objects and surfaces that they are touching regularly, using usual cleaning products
      • workers should arrange methods of safely disposing waste with the householder
      • workers should remove all waste and belongings from the work area at the end of a shift and at the end of a job
      • workers should ensure that they clean the toilet and bathroom area that they have used before they leave the property

      Take measures to reduce transmission through contact with objects that are in the property, or that come in to or are removed from the home. Consider the following:

      • working materials, such as tools or domestic appliances, should be assigned to an individual and not shared if possible
      • if items need to be shared, they should be shared by the smallest possible number of people and cleaned between users
      • ensure residents do not touch equipment brought into the home by operatives / people doing the work
      • bring your own food and drink and have breaks outside where possible
      • when the work requires more than one visit, if possible, isolate the room in which the work is being carried out between visits
      • if this is not possible and the occupier needs to use the room, both the occupier and contractor should agree a cleaning regime
      • do not share pens and other objects with the occupier
      • ensuring social distancing and hygiene measures are followed when supplies or tools are needed to be delivered to a home, for example, building supplies - see further guidance on deliveries
      • collect materials in bulk to reduce the frequency of needing to visit shops to buy or collect materials
      • remove waste in bulk, if possible

      Workforce management for those working in people's homes

      Change the way work is organised to create distinct groups and reduce the number of contacts each worker has. Consider the following:

      • where multiple workers are in a home, create fixed teams of workers who carry out their duties in those teams, and minimising contact between each team
      • identify areas where people need to hand things to each other (such as shared tools and domestic appliances) and find ways to remove direct contact, for example, by using drop-off points or transfer zones
      • allocate the same worker to the same household each time there is a visit, for example, the same cleaner each time

      Personal protective equipment (PPE)

      Where you are already using PPE in your work activity to protect against non-COVID-19 risks, you should continue to do so.  COVID-19 specific advice on the use of PPE and the use of cloth face masks is available.

      Property viewings, valuations and rental inspections

      When planning and carrying out property viewings, valuations or rental inspections the following conditions should be met.

      Prior to visiting the property:

      • the prospective customer should pre-register with the business providing all contact details 
      • all relevant parties (agent, property owner, property occupier, purchaser, surveyor etc) should provide a declaration to the business that they are not showing any symptoms of COVID-19
      • the property visit cannot be carried out if any property occupier is isolating either because they have COVID-19, are symptomatic, or are shielding because they are higher risk to COVID-19.  The business is responsible for confirming this prior to the property visit
      • all property visits should be carried out at an appointed time by one business representative only
      • businesses should hold a log of all property visits undertaken
      • not more than one agent and 2 vendors or purchasers (adults only) will be present at any one property visit
      • the viewing will be deemed to be part of the customer's permitted time outside the house and the total permitted contacts from outside their household in line with the Government of Jersey guidance
      • viewings should be undertaken at an empty property wherever possible.  Where this is not possible the viewing should coincide with the usual occupant's permitted time outside the house in line with the Government of Jersey guidance
      • the property owner is responsible for cleaning the premises before the visit – as a minimum this must include the cleaning of surfaces that are regularly touched, and those which the agent will have to touch, such as door handles and light switches
      • the property owner should open all appropriate doors and cupboards prior to the viewing
      • paper copies of the property details should not be supplied to potential purchasers

      Emergency repair and maintenance in symptomatic or COVID-19 positive households

      No work should be carried out in any household where a household member is confirmed as COVID-19 positive, is symptomatic or are isolating due to contact tracing or return from travel unless it is to remedy a direct risk to the safety of the household, such as emergency plumbing or repairs, and where the tradesperson is willing to do so.

      The isolated person should occupy a different room whilst the work is being carried out, if at all possible. It is important in such circumstances that you ask the householder to explain the problem and the house layout via the phone beforehand if possible.


      During the property visit

      All necessary precautions should be taken during the viewing including:

      • maintaining a physical distance of 1 metre with those outside your household at all times
      • sanitising hands on arrival and departure, with the business responsible for providing hand sanitiser at the entrance to the property
      • customers should be advised not to touch anything
      • the business's representative should wear gloves and try to ensure that only they touch surfaces, including door handles and light switches
      • the business's representative should clean anything that it has been necessary to touch with disinfectant wipes as they move around the property
      • viewings should be no more than twenty minutes
      • wearing of cloth face masks is encouraged

      Open viewings and back to back viewings are not permitted.

      It is the responsibility of the business to ensure that their customers are made aware of the above conditions and that they adhere to them. 

      If it is not possible to adhere to the above conditions, then the property visit should not go ahead.

      Businesses that are unable to apply these guidelines to reduce the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should remain closed.

      Working outside

      Guidance for businesses that offer outdoor services away from their own premises

      Businesses that offer outdoor services away from their own premises, such as gardening or window cleaning, are now able to provide services outside with no prescribed restriction on number of employees working. This is on the condition that they must continue to achieve physical distancing where possible, including travelling to and from the place of work and during the course of the work.

      Principles for opening outdoor business activity



      Make sure you also read

      When working outside, the usual risk assessments for the work should be in place. Before commencing work, these must be updated to take account the need to ensure you have undertaken reasonably practicable steps to reduce Covid-19 transmission risk. This includes ensuring that physical distancing can be maintained and that hygiene provisions are available (such as access to warm water and soap, or where this is not possible, hand sanitisers of 60-70% minimum alcohol content).

      Farm and agricultural businesses

      All farm workers should ensure they maintain a distance of 1 metre from each other as much as practically possible, during work, and when travelling to and from work. This might mean that workers need to travel in additional vehicles. It is recognised that some types of farm work may make it hard or unsafe for workers to stay 1 metre apart at times. Workers should consider when this may happen and minimise the number of occasions when they come closer than 1 metre to each other and keep the duration of those occasions as short as possible.

      Farm and agricultural workers should also follow rigorous hygiene procedures, especially when returning home for the day. They must make sure that any surfaces that are likely to come into contact with more than one person, such as door handles and steering wheels, are cleaned regularly.

      It is particularly important that farm and agricultural workers should not come to work if they develop any of the COVID-19 symptoms. If they develop symptoms, they should immediately isolate at their home, along with everyone in their household. Where workers are living in shared accommodation it should be noted that all workers within that residential unit would be classified as a 'household' and should observe isolation for the whole household accordingly.

      Owing to the risk of multiple employees contracting COVID-19, and therefore being unwell and required to isolate at the same, farm managers could consider how they can further protect their staff. For example, by discussing with workers how they are physically distancing and practising robust hygiene measures outside working hours as well as within.

      Accommodation – hotels, B&Bs, self-catering, campsites

      Updated 2 July

      Guidance for hotels and other accommodation providers looking after those isolating due to coronavirus

      Hotels, and other accommodation providers looking after those isolating due to coronavirus, may all open to all guests.

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      This guidance is for businesses opening accommodation.  It applies to all hotels, commercial hostels, B&Bs, guest houses, self-catering accommodation and camping sites.

      Separate guidance is provided for accommodation providers if a guest tests positive and for hotels looking after those isolating due to coronavirus.

      Additional guidance is provided for campsites.

      Principles for opening hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation 



      Make sure you also read

      If your premises also provides food services or indoor sport and leisure facilities or outdoor sport and leisure facilities you should refer to the relevant published guidance.

      Communal showering and changing facilities that more than one household has access to within leisure facilities must remain shut at this time due to the increased risk of the transmission of the virus in such settings.

      Before you resume business activity at Level 2, there will be a number of adjustments required to your premises, the way that you work and the way you deliver services you provide by applying updated COVID-19 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs).

      When resuming business, you should ensure that guests are aware that current public health guidance advises against members of different households sharing rooms. You may consider adjoining and interconnected rooms where appropriate.

      It is recognised that at the present time some people who are isolating due to COVID-19 will continue to require accommodation.  It is crucial that a hotel or other accommodation knows if their guests are isolating and for what reason, so that they can complete an appropriate risk assessment and decide whether or not they can put the appropriate measures in place and if they are willing to accept them. 

      A business needs to decide whether they are only accepting guests that are isolating, only accepting guests that are not isolating or providing for both. Each scenario will require proper planning and risk assessments to be undertaken.

      Guests visiting from the UK or overseas

      Guests that have recently travelled to Jersey are required to follow the Safer Travel policy.  

      Note that arriving guests that have opted to have a PCR test on arrival in Jersey are exempt from the requirement to self-isolate while awaiting their test result.  Such passengers are encouraged to take reasonable steps to limit the time they spend away from their residence and to limit their social contact during this time.

      In the event that a guest receives a positive PCR test result the confirmed case will be contacted by the contact tracing team to explain the requirements on them to isolate.  The contact tracing team will also contact the accommodation provider as part of this process. The contact tracing team will discuss with the confirmed case whether they are able to isolate within their current accommodation and can provide guidance on what support and services are available from the Government of Jersey to help them.  Where it is not possible for the individual to isolate within their current accommodation an alternative will be found.  

      Provision of Personal protective equipment (PPE)

      Hotels to make disposable gloves available to the cleaning, catering and laundry staff.

      Disposable gloves should always be worn while cleaning the room, toilets and other common areas, and when handling food and dirty laundry. Dispose of gloves if they become damaged or soiled or when cleaning is completed. If gloves become damaged during use, remove and wash hands for 20 seconds and replace with new gloves.

      In line with the Government of Jersey guidance on PPE for health, care and essential workers, no other PPE will be required as hotel staff should have no reason to get any closer than 2 metre to guests with COVID-19.

      When looking after an individual or family isolating the accommodation provider should follow the guidance for Guidance for hotels looking after those isolating due to coronavirus [link] and can contact the coronavirus helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566 for further information and assistance.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Preparing to open hotel hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation

      Declaration of health

      At the time of booking accommodation and when they check in, guests should be asked if they or any household members have any symptoms of COVID-19, have tested positive for COVID-19 or are isolating for any other reason.

      If the answer is yes the hotel should ask whether they have an alternative place to stay and if so they should be encouraged to stay away from the hotel until they have completed their isolation period.

      If a guest develops symptoms or receives a positive PCR test result during their stay they should be encouraged to return directly to their primary residence and complete their isolation at home. Where this is not possible for locals, and for overseas guests, the accomodation provider should seek advice from the helpline and refer to the guidance for hotels looking after those isolating due to coronavirus. Where it is not possible for the individual to isolate within their current accommodation an alternative will be found.

      Separate arrangements are in place for hotels that are providing accommodation for essential health care workers that are isolating.

      Physical distancing in hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation

      You should have a detailed plan in place to support physical distancing between everyone on your premises including staff, guests and any other visitors wherever possible. This includes guest areas and staff work and recreation areas.

      Measures to do this will depend on your business operations but might include:

      • conducting as much of the arrivals process as possible online or by telephone, and providing an express check out service to make the physical check in process as seamless as possible (thereby avoiding potential crowding in the lobby)
      • recommending single household groups only for elevators and encouragement to use stairs
      • limiting the numbers of staff or customers allowed on the premises or in part of the premises at any one time
      • marking out walk-ways to control the flow of customer and staff movement across the premises, if necessary with one-way systems
      • preparing to minimise and control customer queues for food and beverage services, or toilet facilities
      • reducing the number of tables and spacing them out. Tables should be arranged to support guests physical distancing
      • signage and posters to support physical distancing
      • maintaining physical distancing when deliveries are made to your premises
      • scheduling deliveries to avoid crowding in delivery areas and considering non-contact stock deliveries 

      Hygiene and sanitising in guest accommodation, communal areas and workplace

      You should ensure that you have standard operating procedures in place for enhanced cleaning across all sections of the accommodation and workplace, especially for common touchpoints (handrails, elevator buttons, doors).  Hand sanitise should be made available in communal areas.

      You should consider reducing the number of times a staff member enters accommodation / guest room, for example by removing turn down services, only changing towels and bed linen on the request of the guest or having a longer rotation procedure for the replacement of towels or linen.

      It is important to make sure that guests should not be present in the accommodation / room when cleaning is taking place to maintain effective physical distancing.

      Non-essential items in the accommodation such as pens, pads, and other paraphernalia should be removed. You may request that guests ensure that any food or drink stuffs that they have brought into the accommodation are disposed of.

      You might also consider suspending valet parking and luggage drops to bedrooms to avoid cross-contamination.

      You might further consider hygiene welcome packs for guests.

      If you have self-catering accommodation you should consider the risk of cross contamination of food items that are available for guest consumption, and ensure they are disposed of and replaced for the next guests.

      You should ensure you are following enhanced cleaning measures as currently recommended. If a guest is symptomatic or isolating, further cleaning precautions will be necessary – see the guidance for hotels looking after those isolating due to coronavirus.

      The use of disposable equipment, especially disposable cleaning cloths, is strongly recommended, with a fresh cloth used for each room. If other cloths are used, they should be laundered in a hot water wash before re-use.

      While the virus may survive on some surfaces from hours to several days, routine cleaning products are effective at disinfecting these surfaces.

      Cleaning of accommodation should commence no sooner than 2 hours after the guests have departed to allow for air particles to settle.

      Upon the guests' departure, the guest accommodation and bathroom should be deep cleaned with particular emphasis paid to all flat surfaces that are regularly pushed, pulled, turned or touched for example:

      • door handles and light switches
      • tables and counters
      • armrests of chairs (if not fabric)
      • TV buttons and remote controls, telephones, air conditioner (A/C) buttons and remote controls, kettle handles, fridge door handles
      • bathroom including door handle, door lock, toilet seat and buttons, taps, wash-basins, counters, shower and/or bath 

      Disposable items such as shampoo, shower gel and shower caps etc should be disposed of and the end of the guest's stay.

      Food and beverage provision

      It is important that all food and drink services are undertaken in accordance within the guidelines.

      At this time, buffet and "help yourself" areas should be halted because of the increased risk of cross contamination and the management of physical distancing. You should consider as part of your Standard Operating Procedures how you can adapt or adjust your service style.

      Licensing hours are no longer restricted and seated alcohol only services may be provided under the licensed premises guidelines.

      On site leisure facilities

      In line with the guidance for indoor sport and recreation the use of communal hot tubs, saunas, steam rooms, changing and shower facilities is not permitted. Gyms can be used for low and moderate intensity sport and physical activity in line with the guidance for indoor sport and recreation. Hot tubs whose use is restricted to one specific unit can to be used by households staying in that unit.

      Guests may use both indoor and outdoor swimming facilities but should use the changing and shower facilities provided to them in their own guest accommodation (see also new outdoor sport and recreation guidance).

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Campsites

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      Campsites can reopen to guests.

      Principles for opening campsites 

      Make sure you also read

      This guidance is in addition to the guidance for hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation.

      If your premises also provides food services or indoor or outdoor sport and leisure facilities you should refer to the relevant published guidance. 

      The following principles should be followed:

      • guests to bring and use their own equipment as far as possible
      • limit shared equipment as much as possible and ensure adequate sanitising where needed
      • toilets will be open subject to enhanced cleaning procedures with customers encouraged to limit to essential and necessary use of communal areas like sinks for utensil cleaning
      • communal showers and changing rooms can reopen provided the relevant guidance is followed

      When resuming business, you should ensure that guests are aware that current public health guidance advises against members of different households sharing rooms, tents or similar.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing

      Preparing to open campsites

      Risk assessments must be undertaken in a way that is bespoke to your campsite environment and the way that your business operates. In addition to the general guidance for business, there are additional measures to consider to support effective hygiene and social distancing in a campsite environment.

      The key considerations relate to managing the shared access to hygiene facilities across household groups that would have regular daily use for cleaning of food and drink utensils, showers, changing rooms, toilet facilities and swimming pools.

      Your risk assessment plans will need to address both how you will manage and restrict customer flow to maintain physical distancing and prevent overcrowding and how to manage increased requirements for effective sanitising of your customer facilities.

      Declaration of health 

      At the time of booking accommodation and when they check in, guests must be asked if they or any household members have any symptoms of COVID-19, have tested positive for COVID-19 or are isolating for any other reason.  

      If the answer is yes the customer must be asked to stay away from the campsite until they have completed their isolation period.  

      If a guest develops symptoms during their stay they must be asked to return directly to their primary residence.  

      Physical distancing in campsites

      You should have a detailed plan in place to support physical distancing between everyone on your premises including staff, guests and any other visitors wherever possible. This includes guest areas and staff work and recreation areas. 

      Measures to do this will depend on your business operations but might include: 

      • conducting as much of the arrivals process as possible online or by telephone, and providing an express check out service to make the physical check in process as seamless as possible (thereby avoiding potential crowding in the office) 
      • limiting the numbers of staff or customers allowed on the premises or in part of the premises at any one time 
      • marking out walk-ways to control the flow of customer and staff movement across the premises, if necessary with one-way systems 
      • preparing to minimise and control customer queues for food and beverage services, or toilet facilities 
      • reducing the number of tables and spacing them out
      • tables should be arranged to support guests to stay in their single household groupings 
      • signage and posters to support physical distancing 
      • maintaining physical distancing when deliveries are made to your premises 
      • scheduling deliveries to avoid crowding in delivery areas and considering non-contact stock deliveries  

      Hygiene and sanitising in campsites

      Cleaning is one way to remove the virus that causes COVID-19. Normal cleaning frequencies will need to be increased depending on how often the facilities are used. For example, if there is a high level of usage, the normal cleaning frequency should be doubled.

      This will need to be on a case-by-case decision as cleaning frequencies may vary throughout the day depending on the number of users of the facilities. Hard surfaces that are touched frequently (for example door handles, grab rails) should also be cleaned more frequently in addition to standard cleaning procedures.

      More information on cleaning in non-healthcare settings on gov.uk

      Communal shower, washing, changing rooms and toilet facilities

      Campsite showers/changing rooms can reopen for use by campsite customers only.  The use of these facilities are not for use by the general public. 

      Principles for opening shared showers and changing rooms

      The use of communal changing facilities can be used so long as specific additional hygiene and control measures are followed to ensure this risk of virus transmission is minimised. 

      Normal cleaning frequencies will need to be increased depending on how often the facilities are used. For example, if there is a high level of usage, the normal cleaning frequency should be doubled. This will need to be on a case-by-case decision as cleaning frequencies may vary throughout the day depending on the number of users of the facilities. Hard surfaces that are touched frequently (for example door handles, grab rails, etc.) should also be cleaned more frequently in addition to standard cleaning protocols.  

      In addition to increasing the frequency of cleaning by the organisation, each person using a shower should be encouraged to clean the shower and changing area they have used immediately after use.  

      Campsites with shared showers, washing and changing facilities should follow the guidance:

      • introduce staggered start and finish times to reduce congestion and contact at all times 
      • based on the size of each facility, determine how many people can use it at any one time to maintain a distance of one metre 
      • introduce enhanced cleaning of all facilities throughout the day and at the end of each day
      • cleaning should include all areas likely touched by hand including sinks, shower trays and shower curtains. Tiles and grouting should also be regularly checked for condition and cleaned 
      • users should be asked to clean the shower and changing area they have used after use 
      • any showers that do not appear to have been used for a while should be left to run with hot water before use 
      • provide disposable: cleaning cloths, gloves and aprons and ensure they are always available to use by those using showers 
      • provide a cleaning solution for those using shows to use. The standard disinfectant  used within the organisation should be checked to ensure that it is effective against enveloped viruses. If not, consider providing a solution consisting of either: a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1,000 parts per million available chlorine OR a household detergent followed by disinfectant (1,000 parts per million available chlorine) 
      • provide suitable and sufficient rubbish bins in shower areas with regular removal and disposal  
      • a customer notice should be displayed  for users explaining the enhanced cleaning regime and times with a staff checklist for completion and information. The notice should also inform users to carry out the following hygiene requirements: 

      Communal shower guidelines for those using a shared showers and sinks:

      • after you have finished using the shower/changing or sink area you should clean the areas you have come into contact with using the materials provided
      • let the shower or taps run for 30 seconds after use prior to cleaning
      • when cleaning showers and sinks wear disposable gloves and a disposable plastic apron
      • disinfect by wiping down the shower door handles (inside and out), shower controls and any other surfaces touched by hand with a disposable cloth dampened with the cleaning solution provided
      • avoid creating splashes when cleaning
      • dispose of used cloths and materials accordingly in the bins provided
      • report any issues to the management of the facilities

      More information on cleaning in non-healthcare settings on gov.uk

      Legionnaires disease

      It is important to undertake a risk assessment for Legionnaires disease in relation to the water systems on the site including showers.

      Legionnaires guidance

      Toilets and accompanying sink areas, as well as dishwashing areas, can open if businesses are able to put effective processes in place to increase the frequency of cleaning by their staff and to support customers in cleaning areas after use where appropriate. 

      Toilet facilities should be cleaned frequently referring to the general guidance on cleaning of toilet facilities.

      All hygiene and toilet facilities must be regularly monitored to ensure all measures are in place and cleaning products are always available.

      Food and beverage provision  

      It is important that all food and drink services are undertaken in accordance within the guidelines.  

      Licensing hours are no longer restricted for restaurants and cafes serving alcohol with meals and businesses may revert to their usual licensed hours. The exception to this being in campsites where alcoholic drinks can be served through a bar table service from 6pm up to the time of 10.45pm only without needing to order food. This service is strictly for hotel and campsite residents within household groups only and is considered to be in place to support pre and post dinner drinks, whilst ensuring all other food and drink guidelines and general business guidelines are followed.

      On site leisure facilities 

      Guests may use both indoor and outdoor swimming facilities following the guidance on indoor and outdoor sport and recreation. 

      Marinas

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      Marinas can now open to all guests.

      Make sure you also read

      Jersey’s Marinas will now be able to receive off-Island guests under the safer travel guidance. Marina’s offering showering and washing facilities will be required to follow strict hygiene, shower and changing room guidance to reduce COVID-19 transmission risks. 

      Allied and registered health and dentists

      Guidance for Registered and Allied Health Professionals

      Registered and Allied Health Professions are an essential part of the health and care system. Their services are vital in aiding disease and condition management, recovery and prevention of further complications and illnesses.

      Until now Allied Health Care Professionals in community practice, according to government policy guidelines, have been restricted to emergency and necessary procedures only.

      Registered and Allied Health Professionals can now resume all services following this guidance alongside their respective professional bodies to ensure the highest level of protective measures for both patients and staff.

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      This guidance applies to Registered and Allied Health Professionals including the following:

      • chiropractor
      • osteopath
      • physiotherapist
      • podiatrist
      • optometrist
      • optician
      • orthoptist
      • clinical psychologist
      • speech and language therapist
      • chiropodist
      • dietician
      • occupational therapist
      • radiographer
      • acupuncturists

      Principles for opening Allied Health



      Make sure you also read

      If you are a Registered and Allied Health Care Professional or manage a business delivering one of these services, before you resume business activity at Level 2, there will be a number of adjustments required to your premises, and the way that you operate.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing

      Physical distancing for allied health care

      You should have a strategy in place to support physical distancing between everyone on your premises including staff, patients and any other permitted visitors or carers accompanying a patient. Physical distancing guidance applies to all elements of the business premises and operation, including for example stock rooms, staff areas, and delivery points.

      It is accepted that many Allied Health Professionals will not be able to maintain physical distancing when directly providing treatments. However, you should continue to ensure that physical distancing can be maintained where it is possible, to reduce the amount of time staff and patients are exposed to the potential spread of COVID-19.

      Relevant patient history and up-dates can also be taken ahead of any appointment to reduce contact time.

      Only one therapist should be in a treatment room with a patient at a time. Family or friends who are not guardians or carers should not attend appointments with patients unless this is deemed essential. Essential family members and carers should be asked to stay in the waiting room during treatment where this is possible.

      Hygiene and sanitising for allied health care

      Business as usual hygiene measures should be enhanced throughout the Safe Exit Framework to ensure reduced risk of COVID-19 transmission.

      As well as the measures outlined in this guidance, the general guidance for businesses and guidance given by your professional regulatory body you should consider the following hygiene measures on resuming your service:

      • where possible, do not share equipment between staff. If this is required, they should be sanitised between uses
      • all equipment used for the clients and patients should be appropriately cleaned down and disinfected between uses
      • routine cleaning should be maintained and enhanced
      • ensure work bench/station/bed is disinfected after each client or patient
      • gowns, capes, towels and any other linen used by customers and staff should be properly washed between uses
      • single use and disposable items should only be used once then disposed of
      • the disposal of low risk clinical waste can be disposed of as normal household waste but stored for 72hrs before disposal
      • handwashing should be maintained and enhanced, particularly between seeing patients and between changing gloves
      • Natural or mechanical ventilation of air is advised between patients and at least 10 minutes should be allowed between patients for the completion of the necessary hygiene and sanitising requirements

      Risk assessments for allied health care

      Before resuming work, a risk assessment that is bespoke to the services you provide must be completed and mitigating measures implemented. A record of this and your plan for safe opening should be available for inspection by the relevant authorities, including the Health and Safety Inspectorate, upon request.

      In addition to the general guidance for all business, measures you should consider:

      • a review of your seating and treatment space arrangements and adjustments made to allow physical distancing, for example removal or limiting of customer seating in waiting areas if necessary
      • removal of unnecessary furniture and obstacles to ensure as much space as possible is available for safe movement
      • removal of all magazines, newspapers and books from any waiting areas to reduce potential for surface transmission of COVID-19
      • consider and plan how you will operate whilst maintaining physical distance between each person on the premises (except between the member of staff and client when service is being provided)
      • this may mean that not all staff can work at the same time and/or that you will need to limit the number of clients or patients on the premises at any one time
      • you may choose to apply floor markings and use directional signage to help patients and staff maintain physical distancing where appropriate

      Screening measures for allied health care

      In the context of COVID-19 there are important considerations for all health care professionals to reduce the risk of community transmission. You may choose to take additional measures to protect your staff and patients, such as monitoring staff temperatures before commencement of each shift. This may be considered more vital in delivery of the closest contact treatments and services.

      You should ask about your patient's health status, including the risk of being infected with COVID-19 before they arrive for their appointment, ideally by tele-health consultation where possible. If they are showing any symptoms of the virus they must not attend and should call the coronavirus helpline on 01534 445566. If a patient arrives for their appointment and they are showing any symptoms of the virus, as an allied health professional, you are required to formally notify the Medical Officer for Health, which you can do via the online form.

      Confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 should not be treated by those Allied Health Professionals resuming in Level 2. Consultation via virtual means should be provided instead where this is possible.

      Patients must attend on an appointment only basis, which should ideally be made by telephone, text or email.

      You may also choose to screen patients again upon arrival, either verbally regarding any current symptoms they may have, in addition to any temperature check using a no-touch thermometer. You should also consider screening patients for severe vulnerability and vulnerability to COVID-19 and balancing this against the necessity of treatment. If treatment is deemed to outweigh risk, vulnerable patients should be seen at the start of any session or shift, ahead of other patients.

      Personal Protective Equipment for allied health care

      Personal protective equipment, including single use disposal gloves, single use plastic aprons, sessional use fluid resistant type IIR surgical mask and risk assessed eye/face protection single/sessional use should be used. Further guidance on the use of personal protective equipment in healthcare settings is available and where relevant will be up-dated here: government PPE guidance.

      You may also consider encouraging patients to bring a mask with them or have a single use mask available for them.

      Visiting people's homes

      At Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework, people are still discouraged from entering others' homes unless it is essential. The guidance on working safely in people's homes should be followed.

      If a home visit is considered essential or the only option for the customer, you should undertake a risk assessment and develop appropriate plans and procedures that should be followed when providing your services. It is important to remember that when you provide services in other people's homes, you have less control over your working environment and hygiene and so enhanced procedures may be required. Customer understanding, and consent of your service procedures is required.

      You should follow and adapt the guidance set out above for close personal contact services, and consider the following:

      • pre-arrange with the customer how and where you will be working and set out the need for physical distancing to be maintained whilst the service is not being provided
      • discuss with the customer how and where you can access water and soap for handwashing during your visit
      • bring your own hand sanitisers in case this isn't available (with minimum 60-70% alcohol content)
      • bring your own gowns, capes, towels and any other linen used to be used by you or the customer
      • once finished, place these in a disposable bag to return and wash properly between uses
      • single use and disposable items should only be used once then disposed of
      • plan how you will sanitise equipment between uses, which may require a return to your premises to ensure that this can be done properly

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Dentists

      Since 1 June dental services in the community have been allowed to operate but have been restricted to emergency and necessary treatments only. 

      At level 2 of the safe exit framework dentists can resume urgent and routine dental care, in a way that is safe, operationally deliverable and allows dental practices flexibility to do what is best for patients and their teams.

      Guidance for dentists

      Private providers of COVID-19 testing

      If you're providing private COVID-19 testing, you need to follow the published standards and guidance for private providers of COVID-19 testing.

      Wellbeing, cosmetic and beauty services

      Guidance for wellbeing, cosmetic and beauty services

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope?

      This guidance applies to close personal contact services such as hairdressers, barbers, beauty and nail salons, piercing and tattoo parlours and other non-registered services such as massage and reflexology, laser and cosmetic clinics.

      In the case of allied health care services (registered services), other guidance applies.

      Whilst many non-essential close contact services may now resume, due to the increased transmission risk, activities that involve close work on or around the face are strongly advised against at level 2.

      This specifically relates to activities where there in an increased likelihood of breathing in the face of a customer for a prolonged period, such as:

      • face massage or facials
      • all lash treatments including extensions
      • semi-permanent and non-permanent make-up on the face
      • all facial waxing / threading
      • piercing or tattooing of face
      • tattoing on areas of the body close to the face, including neck, chest and front of shoulders
      • laser or other cosmetic treatment to the face

      Close work on or around the face is when the member of staff and customer's heads are close (i.e. are within 0.5m), facing each other and for more than a few minutes. In addition and where practical additional measures that can effectively prevent prolonged periods of breathing in the face of a customer should be implemented. 

      Close work around the face by registered health professionals, for example dentists, must also follow stringent public health guidance that is relevant to their sector. Dentists continue to be allowed to provide close work because despite the high risk, they are providing necessary health care; they work to verified industry standards and have the highest standards of infection control processes in place, including the use of clinical-grade personal protective equipment PPE.

      Avoiding high-risk non-essential close contact services at Level 2 will help to ensure that services resume in a way that is safe for the member of staff and customers and will reduce the risk of the virus spreading to others in the community. Further consideration of mitigations and the proportionality of risk to allow close contact services will be explored to support the case for close work around the face at level one of the safe exit framework.

      Principles for opening close personal contact services



      Make sure you also read

      Before you resume business activity at Level 2, there will be a number of adjustments required to your premises, the way that you work and the services that you provide.

      At this stage of the pandemic, it is vital that the risk of virus transmission continues to be controlled and contained and it is therefore important that you follow this Public Health guidance for the protection of both your staff and your customers.

      Because of this risk and the nature of services you provide, there will be some services that will not yet be considered safe to resume. Examples of these have been listed at the beginning of this guidance.

      Before resuming work, a risk assessment that is bespoke to the services you provide and where these services will take place must be completed and mitigating measures implemented prior to opening. A record of the risk assessment and plan for opening should be available for inspection by the relevant authorities, including the Health and Safety Inspectorate, upon request.

      When you open, you may wish to display a 'we are workplace ready' poster to demonstrate that you have you have followed the government guidelines in order to resume your services.

      It is accepted that when you are providing your services it is unlikely that physical distancing will be maintained between you and your client.  You should however ensure that physical distancing can be maintained at all other times. It is also important to remember that the longer you spend in close contact with your client, the higher the transmission risk between you both.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing

      You should ask about your client's wellbeing before they arrive for their appointment. If they are showing any symptoms of the virus they must not attend and should call the coronavirus helpline on +44 (0) 1534 445566.

      Preparing to open close personal contact services

      You must ensure that you have read the principles for opening close personal contact services at Level 2 and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      Prior to resuming services, you should first undertake a risk assessment and implement all necessary mitigation measures and adaptations. Things you should be considering include:

      Physical distancing

      • review your seating and treatment space arrangements
      • consider and plan how you will operate whilst maintaining a physical distancing between each person on the premises at all times (except between the member of staff and client when service is being directly provided)
      • this may mean closing some workstations off, or planning how you will alternate their use
      • it may also mean that not all staff can work at the same time and/or require you to limit the number of clients on the premises at any one time.
      • you are strongly encouraged to only accept customers who have pre-booked so that you can manage the number of people in the premises at any one time, ensuring that sufficient space is allowed between customers and to prevent any queueing
      • you should remove or limit seating in waiting areas to discourage waiting.
      • apply floor markings and use directional signage to help customers and staff maintain physical distancing
      • remove unnecessary furniture and obstacles to ensure as much space as possible is available for safe movement

      Hygiene and sanitising

      • remove all magazines, newspapers, shared handheld devices and books from customer areas
      • style charts and brochures can be shown to the customer by the member of staff or laid in front of the customer with minimal handling and any such brochures should be sanitised regularly
      • remove any testers and products that would normally be handled by customers and only allow these to be administered by staff without risk of cross-contamination (i.e. removing contents with a clean spatula)
      • where possible, do not share equipment between staff. If this is required, they should be sanitised between uses
      • all equipment used for the customer should be appropriately cleaned down and disinfected between uses
      • routine cleaning should be maintained and enhanced
      • gowns, capes, towels and any other linen used by customers and staff should be properly washed between uses
      • single use and disposable items should only be used once then disposed of
      • the wearing of gloves should be considered whilst working with the customer and if used changed between customers (in addition to regular hand washing)
      • protective perspex screens or similar between client and therapist when providing services such as manicures and pedicures are very strongly advised
      • nose and mouth coverings for staff are advised at all times (cloth masks, disposable masks, and visors), particularly whilst providing treatment to clients, where they are very strongly advised
      • nose and mouth coverings for customers are advised at all times (cloth masks, disposable masks, snoods, scarfs), especially when receiving their treatment where they are very strongly advised

      Visiting people's homes to provide close personal contact services

      At Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework, people are still discouraged from entering others' homes unless it is essential. The guidance on working safely in people's homes should be followed.

      If a home visit is considered essential or the only option for the customer, you should undertake a risk assessment and develop appropriate plans and procedures that should be followed when providing your services. It is important to remember that when you provide services in other people's homes, you have less control over your working environment and hygiene and so enhanced procedures may be required. Customer understanding, and consent of your service procedures is required.

      You should follow and adapt the guidance set out above for close personal contact services, and consider the following:

      • pre-arrange with the customer how and where you will be working and set out the need for physical distancing to be maintained whilst the service is not being provided
      • discuss with the customer how and where you can access water and soap for handwashing during your visit. Bring your own hand sanitisers for in case this isn't available (with minimum 60-70% alcohol content)
      • bring your own gowns, capes, towels and any other linen used to be used by you or the customer. Once finished, place these in a disposable bag to return and wash properly between uses. Single use and disposable items should only be used once then disposed of
      • plan how you will sanitise equipment between uses, which may require a return to your premises to ensure that this can be done properly.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Outdoor sport and recreation facilities and services

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope 

      This is guidance for businesses or clubs that operate outdoor sport or recreation facilities and / or provide outdoor activity services ('outdoor activity businesses'). It supports outdoor activity businesses in identifying how they can adapt their practices to significantly increase safety for staff, volunteers and customers / users in the face of COVID-19.

      This guidance applies to all businesses / venues below or similar organisations that operate outdoor sport and recreation facilities and / or provide outdoor activity services, some of these could already open at Level 3:

      • outdoor sport or recreational facilities - for example, a mini-golf facility, tennis courts, a lawn bowling green, an equestrian centre or horse-riding school, a shooting range, a surfing school
      • companies offering outdoor recreation services – such as outdoor activity equipment hire services, land-based tours (for example, walking tours) and boat tour services (where vessels can maintain physical distancing between people who do not live together)
      • businesses offering training/tuition in activities or that can be conducted outdoors – for example low and moderate intensity sport and physical activity that, with planning, can take place with participants and instructors maintaining a distance of 1 metre from each other, for example, outdoor yoga or Pilates classes and personal training
      • outdoor swimming pools – outdoor pools can open but changing facilities and showers should remain closed
      • outdoor play areas, outdoor gyms, skate parks – users will be encouraged to take extra responsibility for ensuring their own hand hygiene when using equipment with multiple users and touch points like children's playground equipment and outdoor public gym equipment and ensuring physical distancing.
      • the outdoor aspects of after school clubs are permissible - provided that both the guidelines given here and the guidance for schools is followed

      Principles for opening businesses that provide outdoor sport and recreation facilities and services



      Make sure you also read

      A managed continued return to outdoor activity, whilst ensuring that public health measures are maintained, will benefit both mental and physical wellbeing. However, the safety of users, staff, volunteers and their families remains the absolute priority.

      If a business cannot follow the general public health guidance it should not open.

      Of particular importance is that users must be able to maintain a 1 metre physical distance from others that they do not live with. This may mean that venues have to open at reduced capacity.

      Outdoor recreational activities should only open where it is possible to frequently clean regular touch points.

      Equipment should be the user's own wherever possible and if equipment is shared it should be disinfected between use by different users.

      Jersey Sport is also able to help and further information is available on their website.

      Preparing to resume outdoor sport and recreation business

      Undertake a risk assessment and put a plan in place. In developing a specific plan for your setting consider:

      • preparing and implementing plans, processes and systems to meet Government and public health requirements, and provide safe outdoor sport and recreational environments
      • ensuring safe facility and participant practices, like hygiene practices and limiting shared equipment as much as possible
      • being prepared for the management of an individual with COVID-19 symptoms
      • where premises have remained closed during the lockdown period, appropriate health and safety checks should be conducted prior to reopening
      • this includes being Legionella aware; if your premises have been completely closed make sure you've taken all necessary steps to flush your hot and cold-water systems including, all hot and cold water taps, shower heads, other known deadheads as identified in your legionella plan
      • if you opt to open your building for access to toilets and through-ways, there are a number of things you can do to help minimise risks and avoid accidental gatherings
      • consider how you will administer first aid in the case of an accident

      Islanders can spend time outdoors undertaking 'controlled' events like structured / organised sports, community and group activities with a maximum of up to 40 people in attendance at one time. Organisers should plan their activities with this upper attendance limit in mind.

      It is important to engage your staff and volunteers in how to reduce the risk. Their involvement and commitment will be key to reducing risk for everyone. Before a setting opens, staff / volunteers will need to understand how to minimise the risk of the spread of COVID-19 and where appropriate be provided with training.

      Sector specific exceptions

      Some businesses / facilities must not open at Level 2 – these are:

      Changing rooms / shower facilities – They should not open as they are considered higher risk areas for virus transmission. This is because of the difficulties in physically distancing multiple users and the challenge of sufficiently disinfecting these areas between users.

      Toilets or other areas should not be allowed to become used as changing rooms.

      In sports and recreational settings patrons should be encouraged to arrive in their kit ready to participate and then shower and change their clothing at home.

      There is separate guidance for indoor sport and recreation businesses.

      Indoor areas associated with recreational and sporting venues

      As at Level 3, the outdoor areas of heritage sites and the gardens associated with such attractions can continue to be enjoyed. The indoor areas of many such venues are now able to re-open in line with specific guidance depending on their function. For example:

      • food outlets / club houses – may offer alfresco or indoor seating in compliance with the guidance
      • retail – shops associated with leisure facilities and attractions must comply with the appropriate retail guidance
      • office and administrative spaces - these must comply with the guidance for indoor workplaces
      • toilets - toilets must not be allowed to be used as changing rooms
      • other indoor spaces - should be risk assessed in terms of adequate ventilation of fresh air before allowing public access. Particular attention should be paid to any Health and Safety requirements and risk assessment that a business, club or organisation might ordinarily undertake. Furthermore, the guidance regarding indoor businesses must also be followed

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Indoor sport and recreation facilities and services

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      This is guidance for businesses, clubs and associations that operate indoor sport / recreation facilities and / or provide indoor sport / activity services ('indoor activity businesses'). It supports operators in identifying how they can adapt their practices to significantly increase safety for staff, volunteers and customers / users in the context of COVID-19 in Jersey.

      There is separate guidance for businesses that provide outdoor sport and recreation facilities and services and for indoor leisure.

      Indoor sports and recreation facilities play a vital role in ensuring the ongoing health and wellbeing of islanders. A managed continued return to indoor activity, whilst ensuring that public health measures are maintained, will benefit both mental and physical wellbeing. However, the safety of customers, staff, volunteers and their families remain the absolute priority.

      It is important to remember and consider all ongoing health and safety considerations, especially at a time where businesses / venues are not operating as normal and where staff, who normally take responsibility for particular aspects of risk management, may not be present.

      The guidance provides the basis for each operator to develop their own operating guidance for customers, staff, volunteers and supply chains. It helps you to consider the risks and mitigation measures that you will need to put in place to address COVID-19 as well as the day-to-day operational risks.

      It is not intended to be exhaustive in covering every possible scenario but aims to provide a clear direction for the sector. Nor is it intended to cover all aspects of every business. In some areas of activity and exercise provision there will be guidance provided by professional bodies that should be referred to but with local guidance being the minimum requirement. This guidance applies to all businesses and venues that operate indoor sport and recreation facilities, which include, but is not limited to, the following:

      • indoor sport or recreational facilities can open for low and moderate intensity sport and physical activity only – The highest level of intensity permitted is moderate  during which, it feels like you can exercise for long periods of time and you are able to talk and hold a short conversation. Appendix one below, details the Rate of Perceived Exertion Scales which provides a full definition of both low and moderate intensity. For absolute clarity levels 1-5 are permitted.  Level 6 and above are prohibited
      • Businesses that within the guidelines can offer indoor training/tuition in sport or physical activity at low or moderate intensity level as detailed above and in appendix one  – for example, low and moderate intensity sport and physical activity risk activities that, with planning, can take place with participants and instructors maintaining a distance of 1 metre from each other
      • The indoor aspects of after school clubs - provided that both the guidelines given here and the guidance for schools and clubs
      • Indoor swimming pools – venues should be aware that swimming should be at a low or moderate intensity as described above and in appendix one and operate pools to ensure physical distancing is possible. Users should be reminded of these measures. It is highly recommended that operators base their risk assessments and operating procedures on the Swim England ‘Return to the Pool’ draft guidance (www.swimming.org). However, changing rooms and shower facilities should remain closed.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Principles for opening indoor sport at level 2



      Make sure you also read

      If you cannot follow the general public health, business advice or other related guidance then you should not open. In opening a sporting or recreational service, particular consideration should be paid to the following important principles that are critical to supressing virus transmission in indoor sport and activity environments:

      • Ensuring that it is possible to maintain 1 metre physical distancing between people who do not live together throughout the activity. For example, it is unlikely to be possible to maintain 1 metre distance in many small court based games;
      • Ensuring that the room / court itself or any unavoidably shared equipment can be sufficiently disinfected, for example gym equipment may be used (at low or moderate intensity) if the room is well ventilated and sufficient disinfecting is possible between users who are not from the same household;
      • Ensuring the activity is at a low or moderate intensity (see appendix one for a full definition of exercise intensity) and carried out in a well-ventilated area. This is very important because in higher-intensity activity, water droplets arising from heavy breathing are easily spread to equipment and other touch point surfaces and between participants who may be in a relatively enclosed indoor space, even if they are spaced at 1 metre distances. This creates an increased risk of virus transmission. 

      Jersey Sport is also able to help and further information is available on their website.

      Islanders can spend time indoors and outdoors undertaking controlled events like organised sports, community and group activities with a maximum of up to 40 people.

      Preparing to resume indoor sport and recreation business

      Before you resume business activity at Level 2, there will be a number of adjustments required to your premises, the way that you work and the services that you provide.

      In developing a specific plan for your setting consider:

      • Ensuring your plan, processes and systems meet the overarching public health requirements
      • Ensuring your plan, processes and systems meet the overarching advice for businesses and indoor workplaces.
      • Ensuring safe facility and participant practices, like hygiene practices and limiting shared equipment as much as possible;
      • Being prepared for the management of an individual with COVID-19 symptoms;
      • How you will administer first aid to someone
      • If a venue with multiple functionalities in addition to the primary activity for example, food areas, retail, can safely open all its services and at what capacity;
      • Where premises have remained closed during the lockdown period, appropriate health and safety checks should be conducted prior to reopening. This includes being Legionella aware
      • How you will manage toilet facilities to maintain hygiene and physical distancing
      • Encouraging individuals to take reasonable personal responsibility when taking part in physical activity for example, using their own equipment and water bottles and towels etc as much as possible;
      • Establishing protocols for rotating or sanitising any shared equipment;
      • Maintaining rigorous cleaning procedures and ensuring staff carry out regular cleaning of high-contact touch points throughout the premises;
      • Personal lockers should not be used due to the difficulties in maintaining hygiene and physical distancing;
      • Any equipment that is in use for low and moderate intensity sport and physical activity should be 1 metre apart; 
      • Touch points of equipment should be cleaned immediately after use – this can be done either by the customer/user or staff NB this is in addition to the cleaning schedule;
      • Physical distancing and cleanliness will be promoted by the instructor(s) at the beginning and throughout all classes;
      • Small group classes will be organised in a series of formations to comply with physical distancing, with appropriate spacing between participants monitored by the instructor throughout the class/activity;
      • Nothing will be passed to/from the instructor to the user – including personal items, water bottles, bibs etc;
      • We recommend a sufficient gap between users of rooms of 20 minutes to allow for the settling of aerosols and then time to allow for the necessary sanitising of equipment, touch points and hard surfaces;
      • Ensure that the period of time between classes does not cause bottlenecks of customers in waiting areas where physical distancing might become difficult;
      • Equipment (including mats etc.) will be cleaned in between use. This can either be done by the customer/user or staff member and monitored;
      • All visitors/contractors should follow the physical distancing and cleanliness guidelines;
      • You should also be mindful of information and stipulations from your insurers.

      Sector specific exceptions

      Changing rooms / shower facilities / water fountains

      They should not open as they are considered higher risk areas for virus transmission. This is because of the difficulties in physically distancing between multiple and potentially concurrent users and the challenge of sufficiently disinfecting between users.

      Toilets or other areas should not be allowed to become used as changing rooms and should be monitored to ensure this is not the case.

      A 'play and go' or 'beach-style', 'swim and go' approach should be encouraged when undertaking indoor sport or recreational activities. Users should be encouraged to arrive in their kit, ready to participate and then shower and change their clothing at home.

      Soft play areas

      They must not open as there are multiple touch points which cannot be sufficiently disinfected and physical distancing in these facilities is very difficult.

      Jacuzzis, hot tubs, and other spa-type small static-use indoor 'pools' and saunas, steam rooms

      Avoiding high-risk higher-intensity activity at Level 2 will help to ensure that services resume in a way that is safe for members of staff and customers and will reduce the risk of the virus spreading to others in the community. Further consideration of mitigations and the proportionality of risk to allow indoor activity and exercise services will be explored to support the case for allowing higher-intensity activity and exercise at Level 1  of the Safe Exit Framework.

      Defining lower and moderate physical activity (appendix 1)

      The stipulation of low or moderate intensity only at Level 2  is very important for recommencing indoor sport and recreational activities. This is because the virus is spread between people through droplet transmission in the air as well as the many surfaces and touch points where droplets can land. Heavy breathing, as a result of high-intensity  activity raises this risk considerably and so activities that cause heavy breathing indoors are strongly discouraged and should not recommence at this stage of the Safe Exit Framework. This will remain under close review.

      To help you with your risk assessment we define physical activity intensities as follows:

      During low and moderate intensity physical activity, you should be able to comfortably talk and hold a short conversation. This is further explained in the Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale as follows:

      • 1 - Very light activity – anything other than complete rest
      • 2 to 3 - Light activity, feels like you can maintain for hours, easy to breath and carry on a conversation
      • 4 to 5 - Moderate activity, feels like you can exercise for long periods of time, able to talk and hold a short conversation
      • 6 to 7 - Vigorous activity, on the verge of becoming uncomfortable, short of breath, can speak a sentence
      • 8 to 9 – Very hard activity, difficult to maintain exercise intensity, hard to speak more than a single word
      • 10 – Maximum effort, feels impossible to continue, completely out of breath, unable to talk

      Low to moderate intensity exercise is considered levels 4 to 5 or lower i.e. 'very light activity', 'light activity' and 'moderate activity' would be considered permissible at Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework. Anything from 6 and above is considered high intensity and high risk for transmission and is strongly discouraged.

      Further information on what COVID19 and Safe exit level 3 means for sporting organisations and businesses, can be found on Jersey Sport

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Indoor leisure venues

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope 

      This guidance applies to indoor leisure venues, such as libraries, museums, galleries, cinemas, theatres and arcades who are permitted to open at Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework.

      At Level 2, cinemas and theatres are strongly advised to limit their capacity to a maximum of 40 people per screening or show, and follow government advice on gatherings.

      Indoor leisure venues should also follow the guidelines for indoor workplaces, sports and recreation, and food and drink (where applicable).

      During Levels 4 and 3 of the Safe Exit Framework, it was not considered safe to open indoor leisure activities because of the increased transmission risk that these types of venues and activities present. Now we are at Level 2, it is considered safe to begin opening these venues in a controlled way, and subject to the public health advice relating to measures to ensure that transmission risk is minimised.

      Whilst the guidance will mean that leisure venues remain limited in how they can operate, their gradual reopening will contribute significantly to the restoration of social and cultural life and support the physical and mental wellbeing of many islanders.

      For small or other indoor leisure facilities not covered by sector specific advice published by Government, you should follow the principles for opening indoor leisure at Level 2 and adapt a plan that is suited to your premises and business activities.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Principles for opening indoor leisure venues



      Make sure you also read

      A risk assessment must be undertaken, and appropriate measures put in place before opening to reduce and manage the risk of coronavirus transmission. Crucially, this means that the number of people working within, visiting the building and using your service must be able to comfortably maintain physical distancing at all times and there must be adequate welfare and hygiene provisions available. As we are at Level 2 of the Safe Exit Framework, this may mean that you will not yet be able to resume activities to the level you operated at prior to the Covid-19 pandemic.

      A record of the risk assessment and plan should be available for inspection by the relevant authorities, including the Health and Safety Inspectorate, upon request.

      In addition to the general guidance for business, measures to consider in order to support effective hygiene and physical distancing include:

      • the use of floor markings and signage is encouraged to help visitors maintain physical distancing throughout their trip
      • managers are encouraged to familiarise themselves with their premises to identify potential for bottlenecks and assess how these can be managed
      • employees are encouraged to report crowding in areas to their line manager
      • take control of potential risks by removing temptation where possible
      • ensure internal paraphernalia has been removed and furniture is reduced to avoid cross contamination and encourage the maintenance of physical distancing
      • use of screening, such as Perspex, in areas where physical distancing cannot be maintained should be encouraged, for example reception areas
      • consider maintaining the closure of some areas if they cannot be managed in such a way as to support physical distancing
      • queuing and waiting areas should be effectively controlled by an employee with appropriate training and experience to challenge visitors or colleagues that fail to observe physical distancing
      • at point of booking, if possible, customers should be advised they must not travel to the venue should they, or any other member of their household, display signs of COVID-19
      • at point of arrival (if different to point of booking), customers should be asked if they have symptoms of COVID-19
      • if anyone is showing symptoms on arrival, they must be asked to return home to self-isolate and call the Coronavirus helpline (01534 445566)
      • encourage the use of face coverings by employees and customers

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Libraries

      You must ensure that you have read the Principles for indoor leisure venues at Level 2  and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      To manage the number of visitors, you should consider the continued use of online and virtual services as a part of the core library operating model.  When planning to open your premises, you should undertake a risk assessment and implement necessary measures prior opening, which may include:

      • ensure that the number of visitors to the library are controlled at any particular time to facilitate physical distancing
      • library users should be encouraged to browse the library catalogue online before ordering a book, ready for collection
      • once books are returned, they should be left for at least 72 hours before being returned to the shelf
      • implement measures to facilitate the safe flow of visitors and the ability to maintain physical distancing through using barriers, signage and tape as appropriate
      • ensure that there are appropriate means for hand sanitisation around the building and at the book check out area
      • you should assess and plan the work areas for reopening, with spacing between terminals set to facilitate physical distancing
      • you may wish to encourage the pre-booking of terminals and consider time limits for their use, to support the management of cleaning routines
      • terminal areas should be thoroughly cleaned and sanitised between uses
      • the use of meeting rooms is discouraged, and you should consider whether or not it is necessary for them to be opened at this time
      • if meeting rooms are to be opened, guidance to limit the number of people in each room should be available to visitors, and a plan in place to ensure their regular cleaning between uses

      Museums and other indoor heritage sites

      You must ensure that you have read the Principles for indoor leisure venues at Level 2  and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      To manage the number of visitors, consider the continued use of online and virtual tours as a part of your operating model.  When planning to open your premises, you should undertake a risk assessment and implement necessary measures prior opening, which should consider the following sector specific advice:

      • manage physical distancing at daily events that draw crowds, for example any historical re-enactment would have to be closely managed
      • actors and visitors should both be capable of physical distancing and you should avoid situations where there may be gatherings of more than 40 people
      • where an online system supports maximum visitor numbers, visitors should be directed towards this to book
      • avoid accepting walk-in customers and refuse visits if the museum is at capacity to control numbers
      • accept people in specific cohorts in pre-arranged timings
      • put away into storage any exhibits that encourage touching or picking items / objects up
      • consider suspension of push button activities or provide appropriate hand sanitising gel (with 60-70% alcohol content), following use of this equipment and frequent effective cleaning and sanitisation

      You should follow the guidance for the retail sector if you plan to open the museum shop.

      Cinemas

      You must ensure that you have read the Principles for indoor leisure venues at Level 2  and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      When planning to open your premises, you should undertake a risk assessment and implement necessary measures prior opening, which should consider the following sector specific advice:

      Physical distancing

      • consider how you will manage bookings of people from different households, remembering that households do not need to maintain physical distancing, but those from separate households do
      • consider how you will use online bookings; will the system be able to account for physical distancing between bookings and different households? If the system does not enable this, it should be suspended
      • if online booking is not an option, revert to bookings made in person or over the phone
      • the screening will become full at much lower capacity than normal
      • there should be a maximum of 40 customers per screening, and less where physical distancing cannot be maintained at that level
      • the cinema must have in place the facility to close bookings once the limit has been reached or physical distancing cannot be facilitated
      • using markings, introducing one-way flows (where possible) and introducing policies for movement etiquette at entry and exit points and throughout the building
      • clearly mark and restrict entry and exit routes for guests to prevent congregation / crowding
      • it is recommended the cinema install protective screens at the cash registers, with consideration given as to how food and drink is provided to the customer

      Hygiene and sanitising

      • the pick 'n' mix section should remain closed to the public
      • businesses should prevent employees from using different IT equipment during their shift and require regular cleaning and sanitisation of terminals, ensuring employees have been trained on how to clean and sanitise effectively
      • consider how you will check customer bookings when entering the screening
      • at this point you should be reminding customers to only sit in their allocated seat to ensure physical distancing arrangements can be maintained
      • staff should be trained on how to facilitate physical distancing between households
      • utilise customer separation schemes to manage the flow of people coming from or going into the screens
      • consider the delay of film starting times, should it take longer than expected for safe processing of customers
      • use appropriate sharing of information to advise of any change
      • once the film has ended, before the lights come on, an announcement by PA or employee should occur within the auditorium, reminding customers of the importance of physical distancing when exiting and to use the hand sanitiser provided when exiting the premises
      • maintain and enhance regular cleaning
      • you should allow at least an hour from when a screening has ended and all customers have left before undertaking appropriate cleaning and sanitisation, this will allow time for water droplets to drop to surfaces.
      • consider how toilets are managed – introduce signage and/or door supervision to ensure that they do not become crowded and physical distancing can be maintained

      Review 'advice for arcades' should the cinema also have an arcade they wish to open 

      Review for provision of cinema snacks other than pick 'n' mix.

      Theatres

      You must ensure that you have read the Principles for indoor leisure venues at Level 2  and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      Where possible, you should consider outdoor theatres as an option for resuming your activity. When holding an outdoor show, or planning to open your premises, you should undertake a risk assessment and implement necessary measures prior opening, which should consider the following sector specific advice:

      Physical distancing

      • consider how you will manage bookings of people from different households, remembering that households do not need to maintain physical distancing, but those from separate households do
      • consider how you will use online bookings; will the system be able to account for physical distancing between bookings and different households? If the system does not enable this, it should be suspended
      • if online booking is not an option, revert to bookings made in person or over the phone
      • the theatre will become full at much lower capacity than normal
      • there should be a maximum of 40 people per event
      • the theatre should follow guidelines of controlled gatherings of 40 people together, and less where physical distancing cannot be maintained at that level
      • the theatre must have in place the facility to close bookings once the limit has been reached or physical distancing cannot be facilitated
      • using markings, introducing one-way flows (where possible) and introducing policies for movement etiquette at entry and exit points and throughout the building
      • clearly mark and restrict entry and exit routes for guests to prevent congregation / crowding and to encourage a one-way flow of people
      • start times should be delayed if additional time is required to safely seat customers and this should be clearly communicated with all customers
      • singing, in addition to woodwind and brass music, is strongly discouraged both outdoors and indoors because of the very high risk of dispersing droplets and therefore of spreading infection. This is particularly important in indoor settings and when higher risk people are present because of their increased risks from COVID-19
      • consider performing shows without interlude to prevent and limit the harder to control movement of people
      • when the show has ended, an announcement by PA or employee should occur within the theatre, reminding customers of the importance of physical distancing when exiting and to use the hand sanitiser provided when exiting the premises

      Hygiene and sanitising

      • maintain and enhance regular cleaning
      • you should allow at least an hour from when a show has ended and all customers have left before undertaking appropriate cleaning and sanitisation, this will allow time for water droplets to drop to surfaces
      • performers should perform at physically distanced levels at all times
      • performers should have access to changing areas that are physically distanced or appropriately cleaned and sanitised between use
      • if this cannot be achieved consideration will need to be given to time separation, alternative changing systems or a reduction in performers
      • when non-essential travel into Jersey resumes, performers arriving into to Jersey for a show must still ensure that they are following the latest travel and isolation guidance, including the need to remain in isolation for a specified period upon arrival

      For the serving of food and drink, follow the advice for guidance for the food and drink sector.

      You will require permission from relevant bodies, for example the appropriate Parish, licensing board and/or planning as to whether an outdoor theatre could operate.

      Bowling alleys

      You must ensure that you have read the Principles for indoor leisure venues at Level 2  and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      When planning to open your premises, you should undertake a risk assessment and implement necessary measures prior opening, which should consider the following sector specific advice:

      • encourage a one-way system entry into and out of the bowling alley and discourage guests from congregating and walking around the premises
      • guests should be shown to their alley and encouraged to stay there unless they need to visit the toilets
      • maintain and enhance regular cleaning
      • there should be enhanced cleaning and sanitising of touch points in all areas of the bowling alley
      • any shared equipment must be thoroughly disinfected between use, with emphasis on bowling shoes and bowling balls
      • support and encourage customers to use their own shoes and balls
      • it is recommended you follow industry best practice for the cleaning of bowling balls
      • if a high standard of disinfection is not possible, both balls and shoes could otherwise be left for 72 hours
      • households should avoid mixing games with other households
      • it may be possible to book lanes adjacent to one another if physical distancing between households is maintained
      • bowling lanes should be allocated in such a manner to facilitate physical distancing between lanes and lanes will have to be sanitised between each use

      Review 'advice for arcades' should the bowling alley wish to open its arcade.

      Review 'toilet advice' for guidance on how to manage toilet access during a customer's visit.

      Review food advice for guidance on serving food in the bowling alley restaurant.

      Arcades

      You must ensure that you have read the Principles for indoor leisure venues at Level 2  and the general advice for all businesses and workplaces during COVID-19 in addition to this sector specific guidance. 

      Because of the nature of arcade games with numerous touch points, it is recommended that their opening and use at Level 2 is taken with a with a high degree of caution and emphasis on strict cleaning and hygiene measures. If you chose to open these facilities, you should first undertake a risk assessment and implement necessary measures prior opening, which should consider the following sector specific advice:

      • the introduction of a pre-booking system is strongly advised, to help control and limit the number of people on the premises
      • the maximum number of visitors should be that which ensures that people will be able to safely move between games whilst maintaining physical distancing, and shall not exceed 40 persons
      • encourage a one-way system inside the arcade and mark this via signposts and markings on the floor
      • identify any potential areas where people would congregate and work out what to do to stop this
      • physical distancing must be able to be maintained between each game - this may involve removing or switching games off 
      • upon arrival, you should remind customers that if they are not from the same household, they should maintain physical distancing whilst on the premises and not share arcade games without cleaning taking place in between goes
      • there should be strict regime to clean games equipment between every use by persons from different households
      • they should be thoroughly sanitised paying particular attention to touch points such as buttons, card readers, handles, joy sticks etc.
      • consider closure of specific games that require a player to sit inside a small space or limit their use to those who are from the same household
      • if such games are to remain open, introduce signage and enhanced cleaning

      Youth and community groups

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope

      This guidance applies to services provided by youth and community centres, parish halls, charities and social clubs.

      If the premise also accommodates indoor sport and recreation services, the sector specific guidance for businesses that provide indoor sport and recreation facilities and services should also be followed.

      The value and importance to the health and social wellbeing of Islanders in resuming community services and support is well recognised. This guidance should be followed to allow the safe opening of face-to-face support including one-to-one sessions, small group meetings and larger group activities of between 20 to 40 people depending on the structure and controls provided.

      Principles for opening youth and community centres, charity support and social clubs at Level 2 



      Make sure you also read

      Youth Services should refer to government guidelines for opening schools to ensure consistency. A record of the risk assessment and plan for opening should be available for inspection by the relevant authorities, including the Health and Safety Inspectorate, upon request.

      Members, attendees and parent/guardians should be contacted to communicate changes to how activities will be commencing under public health guidance. Communication should explain the measures that have been taken to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread and highlight how attendees must be able to comply with these. This communication should highlight what should be done if people become symptomatic or exposed to COVID-19 and that they should not attend any activities if this is the case.

      Members and attendees who are at higher risk from COVID-19 should be supported in considering the balance of risk from infection and the benefit they would gain from attending community support services. Enhanced measures may be put in place to support these people if they choose to attend.

      Additional planning will be required to ensure this guidance can be followed when organising activity through youth and community centres. For example, taking into account staff numbers needed and contingency plans for any vulnerable staff, as highlighted in the general guidance.

      Collecting contact information

      As we begin to resume activities which present a higher transmission risk, it is important that officers with responsibility for contact tracing have access to information that enables them to quickly identify and contact individuals who may have come into contact with an infected person. Businesses, organisations and organised activities where people are likely to come into close contact with each other (i.e. within 2 metres and for longer than 15 minutes) or where larger organised gatherings occur (20-40 people) are asked where practical to keep a record of people using their services or attending a gathering. Access to this information will only be requested for the purposes of supporting officers responsible for contact tracing when risk of transmission of COVID-19 is identified.    

      As a business or organisation, this may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where it is proportionate and practical to do so. 

      More information about collecting data for contact tracing.

      Staff and volunteers should mix as little as possible and should be organised into consistent teams that always work together where joint working is necessary.

      You should ensure that any physical activities that are low-intensity and carried out in a well-ventilated area. For guidance on physical activities see guidance on indoor sport and recreation.

      Youth and community centres should consider prioritising activity around supporting Islanders at higher risk or those needing support. For example, providing access to premises for access by charity and community organisations delivering one to one support around mental wellbeing and social health or other needs.

      Physical distancing in youth and community centres, charity support and social clubs

      Youth and community centres should carefully consider the activities they resume and wherever possible only organise activities where physical distancing guidance can be followed.

      • wherever possible, activities should be structured, meaning they are organised and more easily monitored by staff to ensure physical distancing
      • in addition, consideration should be given to outdoor activity and support where the spread of COVID-19 is less likely and physical distancing is more easily maintained
      • if informal social activity takes, there should be a limit of 20 people
      • more controlled and structured activity both indoors and outdoors should be limited to a maximum of 40 people, but this type of activity should only occur if there is confidence that physical distancing can be maintained
      • crowding or queues must be avoided at any entry points or drop-off and pick-up areas
      • careful consideration must be given to ensure that there are enough staff to ensure physical distancing
      • cloth masks and other mouth or nose coverings should be encouraged in indoor activities for all adult provision and would be of value in providing static, seated activities and support including one-to-one and small group sessions
      • school age children are exempt from needing to use face masks because of a very low risk of transmission to and from this group
      • using shared transport and car sharing to areas where activities are held should be avoided
      • if shared transport must be used, consider reducing the number of people in each vehicle and using visual cues, for example on minibus seats, to illustrate where people can sit to ensure physical distancing

      Hygiene and sanitising in youth and community centres, charity support and social clubs

      Communal supplies, equipment and surfaces such as tables, hand rails and door handles are frequently touched and can lead to viral spread. They should be cleaned frequently in line with the general guidance on cleaning and sanitation.

      Avoid activities that must by their nature share equipment between different individuals. If it is deemed necessary, ensure cleaning of shared equipment used in recreational or other activities, between each activity or before equipment is passed from one individual to the next.

      If food and drink is served, you should also follow the advice for Food and Drink services.

      Other considerations in youth and community centres, charity support and social clubs

      If youth or community centre activities incorporate a mealtime, packed lunches from home should be encouraged.

      If meals or sustenance must be provided on premises, plate each meal to serve it so that multiple people are not using the same serving utensils (have staff serve food rather than a buffet style). Serve meals outside where possible.

      Stagger mealtimes to minimise the number of people dining inside at any one time and separate individuals as far as possible in line with physical distancing guidance.

      Social clubs that are licensed to serve alcohol will not be able to resume this service, unless it is with plated food. If food and drink is served, you should also follow the advice for Food and Drink service.

      Singing, woodwind and brass is strongly discouraged both outdoors and indoors because of the very high risk of dispersing droplets and therefore of spreading infection. This is particularly important in indoor settings and when higher risk people are present because of their increased risks from COVID-19.

      One-to-one singing, woodwind and brass lessons should also not happen in person at this time, with video-conferencing encouraged as an alternative.

      Worship

      Who does this guidance apply to and scope?

      Places of worship, clergy and religious officials and those organising religious events

      Principles for opening places of worship



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      Funerals and marriages

      Additional guidance for funerals should be referred to as relevant.

      Marriages are will not recommence until 1 July and specific guidance on getting married or a civil partnership during COVID-19 has been published by the Superintendent Registrar.

      Indoor services should be structured events, with limited activity that is not pre-planned and organised.

      At this time both indoor and outdoor services must all be kept to a maximum number of 40 people, including religious officials and clergy.

      Preparing to reopen places of worship

      You should have a strategy in place before you resume activity to help everyone on your premises follow this guidance and the general guidance. This includes religious officials, worshipers and any other permitted visitors.

      Businesses and organisations (including faith groups) are strongly encouraged to keep a record of attendance, where possible. This may mean introducing a new process where previously people have not been asked to share their contact details, where proportionate and practical to do so. This information may be critical to support contact tracing if it is later discovered that one of the attendees had COVID-19.

      Physical distancing in places of worship

      Measures that need be taken to support physical distancing between everyone on your premises will depend on your circumstances and premises but might include:

      • limiting the numbers of religious officials or worshippers allowed on the premises or parts of the premises at any one time
      • introducing a reservation service
      • marking out walk-ways to control the flow of movement
      • strategies to minimise queuing for communion or using toilet facilities if open and ensuring floor markings to guide physical distancing where queuing is deemed necessary or inevitable
      • signage or posters to support physical distancing, or other visual cues such as marking where people can sit to ensure physical distancing
      • coordinating congregations to enter and exit by rows and not to congregate in any one areas or areas

      Hygiene and sanitising in places of worship

      To reduce the spread of COVID-19 through surfaces it should be carefully considered whether physical handouts are necessary, and information distributed via digital means where this is possible. If paper handouts are necessary, for example for those who do not access the internet, they should be placed at the entrance of the premises for people to collect and should be single use only.

      Cash collections should not take place at this time and digital transfers used instead, if this is possible.

      It is essential that normal cleaning regimes are enhanced, and the frequency increased. Cleaning must be carried out between services and time allowed for this. 

      There should be particular emphasis on surfaces that are regularly touched, for example:

      • door handles
      • stairway railings if present
      • pews

      Communion and Blessings should not involve physical contact at this time and are encouraged to follow physical distancing guidelines.

      Singing

      Singing, in addition to woodwind and brass music, is strongly discouraged both outdoors and indoors because of the very high risk of dispersing droplets and therefore of spreading infection. This is particularly important in indoor settings and when older members of the congregation are present because of their increased risks from COVID-19.     

      Funerals 

      Funeral attendance is dictated by the type of service taking place and the location where the service is being held due the differing ability to be able to adhere to physical distancing.

      The RJA&HS has been approved for funeral services for attendances of up to 40 people, this is provided that strict measures are followed by the venue and Funeral Directors as laid out in their submitted risk assessment. These measures include separate entrances for the family of the deceased and other mourners, allocated seating being provided and organised exiting procedures. Between all services a full deep clean of the venue will take place to ensure that suitable hygiene standards are maintained. 

      For services taking place at the Crematorium up to 40 people can now attend (note this is limited by the physical size of the premises), if the service taking place at the graveside up to 40 people can attend. Services for the burial of ashes are now permitted and up to 40 people can attend. Physical distancing measures between members of different households must be maintained throughout any service that takes place at any venue and numbers should be restricted in order to ensure that this can happen.

      It is the responsibility of the Funeral Directors to ensure that these public health measures are adhered to.

      Body viewings are in principle now allowed if COVID-19 does not appear on the death certificate. These should be arranged via funeral directors so that they can ensure a risk assessment is completed and the necessary mitigation measures are in place.

      From the 1 July weddings and funerals will be able to take place within places of worship.

      Construction and building work

      As part of the movement through the safe exit framework the ‘COVID-19 Construction Work Order’ put in place to support the safe opening of the construction industry was removed on Fridat 26 June. The Medical Officer for Health advised the Minister for Health and Social Services that the current process of requiring permits for building and construction was no longer required as tighter measures to reduce transmission risk are relaxed.

      Permits to operate are now no longer required but measures to reduce the transmission risk of COVID-19 are still necessary as part of broader risk assessment and safety planning required under the Health and Safety at work Law and the Management in Construction (Jersey) Regulations 2016. Monitoring of risk assessment and ensuring adequate standards of safety plans, including for reducing COVID-19 risks, will continue to be carried out through health and safety inspections of construction and building sites. 


      Make sure you also read

      Further information on the health and safety requirements on the construction industry is available from the Health and Safety Inspectorate.

      When completing the required risk assessment the construction industry should consider COVID-19 in addition to all other health and safety considerations. Reducing the risk of the spread of COVID-19 should be addressed in the following key areas:

      • when should staff come into work (following current isolation and shielding guidance)
      • how staff should travel to work
      • what to do if someone falls ill at work
      • driving at work
      • site access and egress points
      • hand washing
      • toilet facilities
      • rest areas
      • changing facilities, showers and drying rooms
      • work planning to avoid close working
      • first aid and emergency service response
      • cleaning

      For further information see the Construction Leadership Council's (CLC) guidance 

      Working in people’s homes

      Construction work is now allowed to take place in occupied residences.  All such work should adhere to the guidance for working safely in people’s homes.

      Emergency repair and maintenance in symptomatic or COVID-19 positive households

      No work should be carried out in any household where a household member is confirmed as COVID-19 positive, is symptomatic or are isolating due to contact tracing or return from travel unless it is to remedy a direct risk to the safety of the household, such as emergency plumbing or repairs, and where the tradesperson is willing to do so.

      The isolated person should occupy a different room whilst the work is being carried out, if at all possible. It is important in such circumstances that you ask the householder to explain the problem and the house layout via the phone beforehand if possible.

      Manual work and physical distancing

      In some areas of essential manual work, groups of employees are required to operate together to ensure work is completed safely. In these instances, the 1 metre physical distancing guide should be used as best practice. 

      Every effort should be made where possible to observe the distance during work, and when travelling to and from work but we recognise this might not always be possible.

      Workers must also follow rigorous hygiene procedures, especially when returning home for the day. It is particularly important that employees working in this way should not come to work if they develop any of the COVID-19 symptoms. Instead, they should isolate along with their household.

      Animal-related services

      Animal-related businesses can open in accordance with the general business guidance and guidance for indoor and outdoor workplaces, other relevant guidance may be applicable such as working in vehicles and working in people's homes, for example for dog walkers and mobile groomers.

      Professional dog walkers

      Dog walkers can continue to work where they do not pose a risk to public health. They must follow the guidance on physical distancing for their staff and owners when animals are collected.  Walkers can now make visits between multiple households and mix dogs from separate households when walking in accordance with the guidance for working in people's homes.

      Business support

      Information on the support that is available to businesses can be found on Government support for businesses

      Further advice is on the Jersey Business website.

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