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Government of Jerseygov.je

Information and public services for the Island of Jersey

L'înformâtion et les sèrvices publyis pouor I'Île dé Jèrri

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Working in Jersey

People working in Jersey benefit from a strong economy, high employment rates and rewarding job opportunities.

Employment statuses

Everyone who lives in Jersey has a residential and employment status issued by Customer and Local Services. These statuses can have restrictions for working in the island.

​Employment statusDefinition​​Restriction
​'Entitled'​Someone who has lived in Jersey for 10 years​Can work anywhere and doesn't need permission to be employed
​'Licensed'​Someone who is an 'essential employee'​Employer needs permission to employ a 'licensed' person
​'Entitled for work'​Someone who has lived in Jersey for five consecutive years immediately before the date the card is issued, or is married to, or the civil partner of someone who is 'Entitled', 'Licensed' or 'Entitled for Work'Can work anywhere and doesn't need permission to be employed
​'Registered'​Someone who does not qualify under the other categories​Employer needs permission to employ a 'Registered' person


There can be limited job options for people moving to Jersey if they don’t have ‘Entitled’ or ‘Entitled for Work’ status.  However employers can apply for 'Licensed' and 'Registered' permissions for certain roles.

'Licensed' roles are for essential employees, where the required skillsets may be specialised. The business needs to provide evidence of its efforts to recruit on the island, in addition to details about its financial contribution to the island, training and succession planning. 'Registered' permissions, on the other hand, are usually given to businesses working in seasonal industries such as tourism, agriculture and hospitality.

Registration cards

Photo of Government registration card

When you start a new job in Jersey, your employer will need to see your registration card which shows your residential and employment status. When you arrive in Jersey, you need to visit Customer and Local Services to get your card.

You’ll need to bring your passport or National Identity card with you, and if you're 'Licensed' bring your licensed template letter from your employer.  If you're 'Licensed' or 'Registered', your card will cost £80.

If you're moving to Jersey with a partner, or child(ren), their residential and employment status may not be the same as yours. An unmarried partner will have 'Registered' status unless they’ve lived in Jersey previously. The residential and employment status of your child(ren) will depend on your status, and whether they are still in compulsory education when you move to Jersey.

Residential and employment statuses and registration cards

You can see what jobs are available in Jersey based on your residential and employment status.

Visas and work permits

British citizens and nationals of a member state of the European Economic Area (EAA) don’t need a work permit to work in Jersey.

The EEA includes EU countries and also Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. It allows them to be part of the EU’s single market.

Switzerland is neither an EU nor EEA member but is part of the single market, this means Swiss nationals have the same rights to live and work in Jersey as other EEA nationals.

If you’re a Commonwealth citizen coming to Jersey for a working holiday, you don’t need a work permit, but you will have to obtain entry clearance before arriving in Jersey.

Everyone else will require a work permit which has to be applied for by your prospective employer.

Employment law

The Employment (Jersey) Law 2003 is in place to protect people working in Jersey.

The law covers rights that make sure employees are:

  • paid at least the minimum wage as set by the Government of Jersey
  • entitled to a rest of at least 24 hours in each 7 day period
  • entitled to a minimum of 2 weeks annual leave each year
  • not unfairly dismissed
  • entitled to parental leave after birth or adoption of a child

The Jersey law differs slightly from UK and European laws.

Minimum wage

The minimum wage in Jersey is currently £7.88 per hour.

Finding a job

Photo of phone in hand checking job site

If you want to work in Jersey, it’s best to secure a job before you decide to move. You can start to search for a job online from your home country. Most employers in Jersey will expect you to provide an up to date CV and references.

Even when a work permit is not required, it can be difficult to find a job. Employers in Jersey are expected to fill vacancies with local residents or with those who have lived here for at least the past 5 years.

Moving to Jersey: Finding a job

Setting up or moving a business to Jersey

If you want to become self-employed, set up a business, or move a business to Jersey, by law you must have a licence from the Business Licensing team before you can trade.

These licences are usually only granted to people who have been living in the island continuously for the past 5 years, or who have 'Entitled' status. There can be exceptions where the business is specialised or it has significant economic or social value to Jersey.

You can speak to the Business Licensing team at Customer and Local Services for advice, or you can contact Locate Jersey.

Locate Jersey is the government team whose role is to promote Jersey as a place to live and do business, help with the application process for relocating businesses and high net worth individuals, and provide aftercare services to clients once established on the island. They provide a free, independent, impartial and confidential service.

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